RunBlogRun's Summer Mileage, Weeks 1-4, from RunBlogRun.com

| 0 Comments
Higginson_Ashley-OlyT12.jpg
Ashley Higginson, photo by PhotoRun.net

We have, for coaches and athletes who want to know what they are doing, provided you the first four entire weeks of our cross country training program. This is a good basic program that I used with my athletes in college and also, modified for my high school runners. The program is based on the complex training system used by Pat Clohessy, the fine Australian coach who advised Rob de Castella and Steve Moneghetti. Basically, long run, hills and tempo run were the basic workouts. During track season, I would go to 8 time 400 meter repeats with 200 meter floats in the spring as an adult, but this is the basic program. It includes Lydiard, Cerutty, Stampfl, all of the good ones



RunBlogRun's Summer Mileage Program, Weeks 1-4, from RunBlogRun.com

Weeks 1-4

Summer training is the key to success, not only in cross country next fall, but also the following spring track season. The keys are to build yourself up, both physically and mentally. We at AT&F met with the folks at Saucony to help promote this program. Here's what we're going to do: We'll provide you with 12 weeks of summer and fall training, taking you through the first month of your season in this training program. We'll also provide you with fine-tuning suggestions each and every week on www.atf-athlete.com starting the week of July 1. We're publishing this piece in American Track & Field, Athletes Only, and California Track & Running News.
After your track season, you need to take a couple weeks' break. The break can be a complete departure from running and your regular schedule. If you want to run, then no more than four runs a week of about 40 minutes. Your body and spirit need a break. Pick some books you want to read this summer. Pick the movies you've not yet seen. Do some summer vegging. Remember, your summer training program is to build you up and prepare your body and spirit to handle the hard racing and training that come in the fall. This can only happen if you allow your body to rest and find outlets from the training regimen.

Before You Begin Your Training . . .
1. Make sure you have two pairs of good training shoes. We suggest that most training shoes can last about 12­-16 weeks with your level of training. Take your time when you go to your local running store to purchase training shoes and remember to go at the end of the day (your feet swell during the day). Bring a clean pair of socks and be prepared to check out 5-7 pairs of shoes to find the right shoe for you. Also check socks, shorts, and tops (although you probably have enough t-shirts to keep you going for months!).

2. Make sure you're hydrating yourself. Eight to 10 glasses of water a day plus sports drinks and juice are a good start. Drink coffee, tea and carbonated soda sparingly.

3. You need to fuel the engine. To do that, you have to get the proper amount and proper types of food into your system. Fruits, vegetables, whole grains, pasta, and modest amounts of fish, chicken and beef make sense. For snacks, try an apple and peanut butter. Nuts are good. Pizza, tacos and a trip to fast food places are fine, as long as you're not doing it every day!

4. Sleep. Yes, sleep is important. I know that at 17 or 18 you can text all night or check out the newest game on Xbox, but it will affect your training. Get 8­-10 hours of sleep and, if you can, try for a nap (yes) on a few afternoons.

5. Get your training group down. Some people like to train by themselves, but find a group helps with the hard days or long runs. Find what works for you and your training style.

6. Inspiration. Find some good books (Once a Runner, The Irishmen Who Ran for Britain, The Lonely Breed, A Cold, Clear Day, Self-Made Olympian) that can inspire you. Find music that inspires you (Outkast, Disturbed, Hurt, Counting Crows, Led Zeppelin, ACDC). We will post our partner's, the Shoe Addicts, running music lists to inspire you! 

7. Goals. Do you want to make the top 7? Do you want to improve your times at your league and section meets? Do you want to race better over the second half of the course? Think about these things now, write them on a card and prop them in your room where you can read them each day.

Week 1: Summer Training Begins . . .
In this week, we get you on the road to a good summer of training. You will run a long run, a tempo run and some moderately paced runs each week. Don't worry about pace the first two weeks, just get out there, have some fun and get in the habit. Workouts always start with warmup, some gentle stretching major muscle groups, light jogging. Do the same for cool down.

Monday: Warm up; 35-40 minutes easy running; cool down.

Tuesday: 1-mile warm up; 20-minute tempo run; 1-mile cool down. 

To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. For example: if you currently run 19 minutes for a 5K, that's 6:10 pace. Add 30 seconds and your tempo run pace is 6:40-per-mile. 

Wednesday: Warm up; 35-­40 minutes easy running; cool down.

Thursday: 1-mile warm up; 2 Hill Repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to start. Repeat one more time, no rest); 1-mile easy cool down.

Friday: Warm up; 35-40 minutes easy running; cool down.

Saturday: Off. Walk, bike, see Man Of Steel.

Sunday: Long, easy run, 45 minutes, on grass or dirt.

Week 2: Getting the Habit Started . . .
Make sure that you're doing your runs on a variety of surfaces--dirt, grassy fields, sand, road, track. It's good for the feet, and lets you use your feet in a healthy way.You'll be a little sore this week as your body adjusts. Drink your liquids, sleep, eat well and hang out with your friends.

Monday: ­Warm up; 40 minutes easy running; 2x150 yards relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: 1-mile warm up; 20-minute tempo run; 1-mile cool down. 
To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. For example: if you currently run 19 minutes for a 5K, that's 6:10 pace. Add 30 seconds and your tempo run pace is 6:40-per-mile. 

Wednesday: Warm up; 40 minutes easy running; 2x150 yards relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Thursday: 1-mile warm up; 3 Hill Repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to start. Repeat twice more, no rests); 1-mile easy cool down.
Friday: Warm up; 40 minutes easy running; 2x150 yards relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Saturday: Off. Walk, bike, watch a movie.

Sunday: Long, easy run, 50 minutes, on grass or dirt.

Week 3: Training Gets Rolling . . .
You will begin running 6 days a week. Juniors and seniors can being 7 days a week. For college athletes, add a 35-40 minute session of easy running on Monday, Wednesday and Friday. 

Monday: Warm up; 40-45 minutes easy running; 3x150 yards relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: 1-mile warm up; 20-minute tempo run, 1-mile cool down. 
To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. For example: if you currently run 19 minutes for a 5K, that's 6:10 pace. Add 30 seconds and your tempo run pace is 6:40-per-mile. 

Wednesday: Warm up; 40-45 minutes easy running; 3x150 yards relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Thursday: 1-mile warm up, 4 Hill Repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to start. Repeat three more times, no rests); 1-mile cool down.

Friday: Warm up; 40-45 minutes easy running; 3x150 yards relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Saturday: Easy 30-minute run or a walk.

Sunday: Long, easy run, 50-55 minutes, on grass or dirt. Hang with friends.

Week 4: The Training Gets Tough . . .
By now, you should be running at a better pace than when you started and noting that your tempo runs are more fun. You're getting into a groove. Do the tempo runs and hill runs with teammates. The hard workouts are easier this way.

Monday: Warm up, 40-45 minutes easy running; 4x150 yards relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: 1-mile warm up, 20-minute tempo run, 1-mile cool down. 

To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. For example: if you currently run 19 minutes for a 5K, that's 6:10 pace. Add 30 seconds and your tempo run pace is 6:40-per-mile.

Wednesday: Warm up, 40-45 minutes easy running; 4x150 yards relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Thursday: 1-mile warm up, 5 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to start. Repeat four more times, no rests); 1-mile easy cool down.

Friday: Warm up, 40-45 minutes easy run; 4x150 yards relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Saturday: Find an all-comers meet and run a 2-mile or 5K. Warm up, run strong, and then cool down.

Sunday: Long, easy run, 55-60 minutes, on grass or dirt, with friends.

‪#‎RBRSummertraining‬‪#‎RBRsummermileage‬‪#‎crosscountry‬,

Leave a comment

Wake up to RunBlogRun's news in your inbox. Sign up for our newsletter and we'll keep you informed about the Sport you love.

Subscribe to RunBlogRun's Global News Feed

* indicates required