September 2015 Archives

Kipchoge-Mutai-LilesaH-Berlin15.JPGThe battle for Berlin, photo by PhotoRun.net

The picture above shows Eliud Kipchoge, Emmanuel Mutai and Fiyesa Lelisa dueling in Berlin. Running 26.2 miles at 4:40-4:45 pace is a rareified talent. Many can run a marathon, few can race one. Red lining it, or running at near one's max for 24 miles and then, racing to the finish is something that few can do and for a short time.

Cathal Dennehy provided five deep thoughts on the race as he was leaving Berlin on Tuesday.

Week 16, Day Three, September 30, 2015, Wednesday

AyanaLedsDibaba-Beijing15.JPGAyana battles Dibaba, WC 2015, photo by PhotoRun.net

The Women's 5000 meters was a fascinating event in Beijing. Almaz Ayana, who was beaten by Genzebe Dibaba in Paris, broke the WR holder at the 1,500 meters outdoors with a gutty long run to the finish, from 3000 meters out! The lesson to learn? There are many ways to break your competitors, and this one was an exciting addition to Almaz' arsenal.

Use different tactics! Try different tactics.

Week 16, Day Three, September 30, 2015, Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Week 16: Racing Season is here! !

For most, two more weeks and conference meets are upon us. Your racing continues, two to three times a week for another two weeks. Use those days to learn, and try something different on each race and also focus on team racing.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: Race Day 1

Here are three options for this day of the week:

1. Race Day

a. Warm up, with one to two miles, and some stride outs, 5k race, then, one of the following:

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Repetions: after race, four times five minutes at 5k race pace, with easy five minutes recovery in between, long cooldown, 2-3 miles

3. Twelve laps on 400 meter track, sprinting straights, jogging turns, straights at mile pace of current 5k racing.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Race Day 2

1. Race Day, warm up well, some strideouts, 5k race, cool down a bit, then, one of the following:

a. Hill work, 1-mile warmup; 9 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start; repeat 8 times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds and then do your 1-mile easy cool-down.

2. Five times 3:00, at mile pace for 5k, with two minute jog in between, then cooldown

3. Repetiions: Three times six minutes, at 5k race pace, six minutes easy jogging in between, then cooldown

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day 3

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, try one of the following:

1. 6 x 300 meters, with each one faster than one before, then cooldown

2. 4 x 3 minutes at 5k race pace, with three minutes easy, then cooldown

3. 5k course loop, sprint 100 meters, jog 100 meters, do that the entire course, then, cooldown

Sunday: Easy 7-10-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are switching over to racing.

Kamworor_Geoffrey-Beijing15.JPGGeoffrey Kamworor, photo by PhotoRun.net

With a month after the World Champs, Justin Lagat makes some predictions on how athletes will fare and run on the roads over the next couple months.

2015-USATFoutdoors-men-5000m.jpgThe battle for the finish, USA 5000 meters, photo by Brian Eder/RunBlogRun

Congrats to the U of Oregon and TrackTown USA on their recognition by Athletics for a Better World. We have saluted the work of the Council for Responsible Sport, which worked with the IAAF on developing the Athletics for a Better World.

Keith Peters of the Council for Responsible Sport says it best. It is the small steps.

I think it is fantastic that the IAAF is championing leaving a smaller footprint with our global events. Our global sport should lead the charge in recognizing that the small steps add up to many steps in making Athletics for a Better World.

Chipangama_JordanH-SanJose15.JpgJordan Chipangama, RNR San Jose Half marathon, photo by PhotoRun.net


Week 16, Day Two, September 29, 2015, Tuesday:
Race Day 1

Here are three options for this day of the week:

1. Race Day

a. Warm up, with one to two miles, and some stride outs, 5k race, then, one of the following:

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Repetions: after race, four times five minutes at 5k race pace, with easy five minutes recovery in between, long cooldown, 2-3 miles

3. Twelve laps on 400 meter track, sprinting straights, jogging turns, straights at mile pace of current 5k racing.

Week 16: Racing Season is here! !

For most, two more weeks and conference meets are upon us. Your racing continues, two to three times a week for another two weeks. Use those days to learn, and try something different on each race and also focus on team racing.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: Race Day 1

Here are three options for this day of the week:

1. Race Day

a. Warm up, with one to two miles, and some stride outs, 5k race, then, one of the following:

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Repetions: after race, four times five minutes at 5k race pace, with easy five minutes recovery in between, long cooldown, 2-3 miles

3. Twelve laps on 400 meter track, sprinting straights, jogging turns, straights at mile pace of current 5k racing.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Race Day 2

1. Race Day, warm up well, some strideouts, 5k race, cool down a bit, then, one of the following:

a. Hill work, 1-mile warmup; 9 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start; repeat 8 times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds and then do your 1-mile easy cool-down.

2. Five times 3:00, at mile pace for 5k, with two minute jog in between, then cooldown

3. Repetiions: Three times six minutes, at 5k race pace, six minutes easy jogging in between, then cooldown

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day 3

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, try one of the following:

1. 6 x 300 meters, with each one faster than one before, then cooldown

2. 4 x 3 minutes at 5k race pace, with three minutes easy, then cooldown

3. 5k course loop, sprint 100 meters, jog 100 meters, do that the entire course, then, cooldown

Sunday: Easy 7-10-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are switching over to racing.

Keflezighi_Meb1-SanJose15.JpgMeb Keflezighi, September 27, 2015, photo by Photorun.net

Meb set Master's ARs for 20k (59:43) and 1/2 marathon (1:03:02) yesterday, September 27, 2015. His background of cross country, track and his gentle buildup over a decade to become one of the best American distance runners ever.

Week 16, Day One, September 28, 2015. Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Week 16: Racing Season is here! !

For most, two more weeks and conference meets are upon us. Your racing continues, two to three times a week for another two weeks. Use those days to learn, and try something different on each race and also focus on team racing.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: Race Day 1

Here are three options for this day of the week:

1. Race Day

a. Warm up, with one to two miles, and some stride outs, 5k race, then, one of the following:

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Repetions: after race, four times five minutes at 5k race pace, with easy five minutes recovery in between, long cooldown, 2-3 miles

3. Twelve laps on 400 meter track, sprinting straights, jogging turns, straights at mile pace of current 5k racing.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Race Day 2

1. Race Day, warm up well, some strideouts, 5k race, cool down a bit, then, one of the following:

a. Hill work, 1-mile warmup; 9 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start; repeat 8 times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds and then do your 1-mile easy cool-down.

2. Five times 3:00, at mile pace for 5k, with two minute jog in between, then cooldown

3. Repetiions: Three times six minutes, at 5k race pace, six minutes easy jogging in between, then cooldown

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day 3

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, try one of the following:

1. 6 x 300 meters, with each one faster than one before, then cooldown

2. 4 x 3 minutes at 5k race pace, with three minutes easy, then cooldown

3. 5k course loop, sprint 100 meters, jog 100 meters, do that the entire course, then, cooldown

Sunday: Easy 7-10-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are switching over to racing.

Kipchoge_Eluid-Berlin15.JPGEliud Kipchoge, photo by PhotoRun.net

I have been fascinated with the reactions to Eliud Kipchoge's win today. Much of the social media response has been about insoles moving around his shoes, causing blisters and even cutting his toe.

We live in a time where everything has to have an reason and that someone or something has to be at fault. I would like to offer another suggestion.

Read on, please.

Great day in Speed City, by Larry Eder

Keflezighi_Meb1b-Falmouth15.JPGMeb Keflezighi in Falmouth, August 2015, photo by PhotoRun.net

In the 1960s and early 1970s, San Jose was the home of some of the most brilliant
sprinters of all times. Many of them were coached and mentored by the late Bud
Winter. Winter had honed his skills in WW2 teaching pilots how to relax for the long
fighter flights and bomber flights over Germany.

Winter took those skills and used them to teach the long sprinters, those over 200 meters
and 400 meters, how to use their talents to relax and run faster.

On the long distance scene, the Santa Clara Youth Village was key in the development
of some of the greatest American distance runners of all times. A huge tradition of
fine distance running has been seen in the South Bay.

This writer met Bud Winter as a sophomore in high school, in 1974, when he spoke at our Coach's
retirement dinner. Father Ray Devlin, S.J., aka Rocket Ray, had Bud Winter speak for us.
We were inspired by the man who had made so many medals, but did not grasp the notions of
relaxing to run faster.

Meb uses that, and even on a bad day, set AR master's records at the half marathon and 20k!

Kipchoge_EluidFH1-Berlin15.JPGEliud Kipchoge is victorious, photo by PhotoRun.net

Eliud Kipchoge ran a brilliant race, taking off at 30k and running 14:23 for the 30-35k section of the race. He had a few issues to deal with, and still did it!

Here is Cathal Dennehy's story on Eliud's win!

Now, for Eliud, there is one focus: RIO.

Kipchoge_Eluid-Berlin15.JPGEliud Kipchoge, photo by PhotoRun.net

Eliud Kipchoge is the best marathon racer in the world. He came through the sport the old fashioned way, by running cross country, then track and field, then, moving to the marathon.

Week 15, Day Seven, September 27, 2015, Sunday: Easy 7-10-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are switching over to racing.

Week 15: Racing in Earnest!

The next two weeks are key to you and your team's success. We will pre supose that you have races on Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday. As this is very early season, we will provide alternate workouts for those days, plus work to do after the races. Stress warm ups and cooldowns. Stress team running. Realize that if your goals are to race well at conference and beyond, then, the early meets are part of your training and callousing.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: Race Day 1

Here are three options for this day of the week:

1. Race Day

a. Warm up, with one to two miles, and some stride outs, 5k race, then, one of the following:

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Repetions: after race, four times five minutes at 5k race pace, with easy five minutes recovery in between, long cooldown, 2-3 miles

3. Fartlek: after race, 40 minutes of 2 minutes on, 2 minutes off, repeat ten times, 2 minutes on is at 5k race pace, then, nice easy cooldown.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Race Day 2

1. Race Day, warm up well, some strideouts, 5k race, cool down a bit, then, one of the following:

a. Hill work, 1-mile warmup; 9 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start; repeat 8 times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds and then do your 1-mile easy cool-down.

2. Five times 3:00, at mile pace for 5k, with two minute jog in between, then cooldown

3. Repetiions: Three times six minutes, at 5k race pace, six minutes easy jogging in between, then cooldown

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day 3

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, try one of the following:

1. 6 x 300 meters, with each one faster than one before, then cooldown

2. 4 x 3 minutes at 5k race pace, with three minutes easy, then cooldown

3. 5k course loop, sprint 100 meters, jog 100 meters, do that the entire course, then, cooldown

Sunday: Easy 7-10-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are switching over to racing.

Thumbnail image for Mutai_EmmanuelPC-Berlin15.JPGEmmanuel Mutai, 2015 BMW Berlin Press conference, photo by PhotoRun.net

Emmanuel Mutai is one of the fastest marathoners in the world.

He is also part of the same training group with Eliud Kipchoge. Emmanuel Mutai and Eliud Kipchoge workout together three times a week.

Kipchoge has lost one marathon, and that was to Wilson Kipsang. He then defeated Kipsang in London. Mutai has placed well in most of his marathons, winning only one.

Will this be the race where he really puts the pedal to the proverbial metal?

Here is the interview done by Andy Edwards at the pre Berlin Marathon interviews. Andy Edwards does the interviews for his company, Race News Service.

Kastor_DeenaH-Pasadena13.JPgDeena Kastor, photo by PhotoRun.net

Deena Kastor ran 15:48 this morning for 5k, on the fast course in downtown San Jose. Deena told us that she had a bit of a bug this week, but really wanted to run in San Jose. Finishing third overall, Deena looked great after the race on this cool, crisp early Fall morning.

Kastor_DeenaM-Dallas14.JPgDeena Kastor, photo by PhotoRun.net

Deena Kastor took off fast this morning in San Jose. I arrived at the finish line of 5k to see the top two men, 15:42 and then, 15:44, and then, Deena Kastor in 15:48.

Deena recovered quickly and we chatted for a few minutes.

This is the interview I did right after the race.

Pippig-HahnerPC-Berlin15.JPGUtta Pippig and Anna Hahner, Berlin Press Conference, photo by PhotoRun.net

Andrew Edwards interviewed both Utta Pippig and Anna Hahner at the 2015 BMW Berlin Press conference. Hahner and Pippig represent different eras of German distance running.

Mutai-Kipchoge-MutaiPC-Berlin15.JPGEmmanuel Mutai, Eliud Kipchoge, Geoffrey Mutai, Berlin Presser, September 25, 2015, photo by PhotoRun.net

This is how Justin Lagat considers the field for the 2015 BMW Berlin Marathon. Let's see how our friend from KenyanAthlete.com handicaps the race.

Hassan_SifanFV-EuroXC13.jpgSifan Hassan, winning SPAR European XC, Dec 2013, photo by PhotoRun.net

Week 15, Day 6, September 26, 2015, Saturday

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, try one of the following:

1. 6 x 300 meters, with each one faster than one before, then cooldown

2. 4 x 3 minutes at 5k race pace, with three minutes easy, then cooldown

3. 5k course loop, sprint 100 meters, jog 100 meters, do that the entire course, then, cooldown

Week 15: Racing in Earnest!

The next two weeks are key to you and your team's success. We will pre supose that you have races on Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday. As this is very early season, we will provide alternate workouts for those days, plus work to do after the races. Stress warm ups and cooldowns. Stress team running. Realize that if your goals are to race well at conference and beyond, then, the early meets are part of your training and callousing.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: Race Day 1

Here are three options for this day of the week:

1. Race Day

a. Warm up, with one to two miles, and some stride outs, 5k race, then, one of the following:

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Repetions: after race, four times five minutes at 5k race pace, with easy five minutes recovery in between, long cooldown, 2-3 miles

3. Fartlek: after race, 40 minutes of 2 minutes on, 2 minutes off, repeat ten times, 2 minutes on is at 5k race pace, then, nice easy cooldown.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Race Day 2

1. Race Day, warm up well, some strideouts, 5k race, cool down a bit, then, one of the following:

a. Hill work, 1-mile warmup; 9 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start; repeat 8 times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds and then do your 1-mile easy cool-down.

2. Five times 3:00, at mile pace for 5k, with two minute jog in between, then cooldown

3. Repetiions: Three times six minutes, at 5k race pace, six minutes easy jogging in between, then cooldown

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day 3

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, try one of the following:

1. 6 x 300 meters, with each one faster than one before, then cooldown

2. 4 x 3 minutes at 5k race pace, with three minutes easy, then cooldown

3. 5k course loop, sprint 100 meters, jog 100 meters, do that the entire course, then, cooldown

Sunday: Easy 7-10-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are switching over to racing.

Mutai-Kipchoge-MutaiPC1-Berlin15.JPGEmmanuel Mutai, Eliud Kipchoge, Geoffrey Mutai, 2015 BMW Berlin Presser, photo by PhotoRun.net

The 2015 BMW Berlin Marathon will be held in Berlin on Sunday, September 27. On one of the fastest courses in the world, some of the world's fastest and fittest marathoners will be racing. RunBlogRun will be covering the race, LIVE around RunBlogRun.com.LIVE.

Here is Cathal Dennehy's feature on the Men's Berlin Presser, which happened, on September 25, 2015.

Mutai_GeoffreyPC-Berlin15.JPGGeoffrey Mutai, September 25, 2015, Berlin Interview, photo by PhotoRun.net

This interview of Geoffrey Mutai was done by Andy Edwards of Race News Service. Geoffrey is one of the fastest men EVER over the marathon distance. His run in Boston, on a non record course, surprised many, but should not have. Mutai is a marathon road warrior.

Enjoy the interview from our global partners, Race News Service. Geoffrey Mutai has had a series of sub par marathon performances, but is hoping for a fast one.

Kipchoge_EluidPC-Berlin15.JPGEliud Kipchoge, photo by PhotoRun.net

Our Kenyan correspondent, Justin Lagat, tells the story of some young students, not familiar with Eliud Kipchoge, watching him do repeat 1000 meters and noting the "electricity" of his running.

This writer remembers asking Eliud in Chicago why he was smiling after 35k in Chicago in 2014, when he decimated the field.

What shall we see in Berlin tomorrow? A smile and electricity?

We shall have to wait just less than a half a day!

Here is the interview of Eliud Kipchoge by Andy Edwards, done this week!

Andy Edwards did this interview for Race News Service, our global partner in covering the marathons of the world.

Kipchoge_EluidM-Berlin13.JPGEliud Kipchoge, Berlin 2013, photo by PhotoRun.net

The team at BBC World Service are some of the most innovative people in sports media. They capture the essence of our sport with audio clips from around the world. I was lucky enough to spend time with them in Beijing and enjoy the fast pace and focus on detail. Ed Harry is the man you hear much of the time and his partners in sports radio are superb!

Here is the page that they did on the upcoming Berlin Marathon! Enjoy listening to some really exciting stories on the 2015 Berlin Marathon this weekend!

Here is the link that Ed Harry provided on their Berlin coverage: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/articles/2fVlBr17bKP85tgl0Gy1dvf/how-to-break-a-record-in-berlin

We have broken it up below for you:

The largest running organization in the U.S. is the Road Runners Clubs of America. Since 1958, they have lead the sport of road running and supported promising long distance runners, both at the front of the pack and the back of the pack. Now, with 177,000 members and 2100 clubs, the RRCA lets its money and feet do the talking.

Jean Knaack is the executive Director of the RRCA, and has held this position for the past decade. Fortius Media Group custom publishes the RRCA magazine Club Running, the oldest long distance running magazine in the U.S.

Great job to the RRCA for supporting promising runners!

Cherono_GladysPC-Berlin15.JPGGladys Cherono, September 24, 2015, Berlin, photo by PhotoRun.net

Gladys Cherono is a women on a mission. One of the finest long distance runners on the planet, Glady's is ready to run a fast one.

If you are going to run fast, then, run fast in Berlin. At least, that is Berlin's race director, Mark Milde's wish.

Here is the interview by Andy Edwards for Race News Service, one of our global partners. Notice how Andy intereviews his guests. Thoughtful, giving them time to answer questions and filling in the pieces as fans, we want to hear.

Watch our coverage on Sunday at RunBlogRun.com.Live

Kipchoge_EliudBMW-Berlin15.JPGEliud Kipchoge, September 25, 2015, Berlin Press Conference, by PhotoRun.net

Eliud Kipchoge is the Zen Master of the marathon. It is not that he was a natural at the distance, he was not fond of it at first. But, Eliud Kipchoge used his cross country and track background and built up his endurance over several years.

His battle with Wilson Kipsang in London last April 2015 is, in my mind, one of the greatest marathons of all times. His defeat of Kenenisa Bekele in Chicago in October 2014 was a masterpiece of tactics. His smile as he dropped to 4:40 mile or better pace after 35k in Chicago was one of a man truly confident, but also a man whose hunches played out well. Kipchoge had broken the greatest track athlete at 10k and 5k ever, a man who still holds the two key world records on the long distance world: 5000 meters and 10,000 meters.

What will Eliud Kipchoge do on Sunday?

Well, Cathal Dennehy and I believe he will run fast.

Very, very fast.

BarrettLedsJenks-FLxcFinal13.jpgFootlocker Champs, Dec 2013, photo by Photorun.net

Week 15, Day 5, September 25, 2015, Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Week 15: Racing in Earnest!

The next two weeks are key to you and your team's success. We will pre supose that you have races on Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday. As this is very early season, we will provide alternate workouts for those days, plus work to do after the races. Stress warm ups and cooldowns. Stress team running. Realize that if your goals are to race well at conference and beyond, then, the early meets are part of your training and callousing.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: Race Day 1

Here are three options for this day of the week:

1. Race Day

a. Warm up, with one to two miles, and some stride outs, 5k race, then, one of the following:

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Repetions: after race, four times five minutes at 5k race pace, with easy five minutes recovery in between, long cooldown, 2-3 miles

3. Fartlek: after race, 40 minutes of 2 minutes on, 2 minutes off, repeat ten times, 2 minutes on is at 5k race pace, then, nice easy cooldown.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Race Day 2

1. Race Day, warm up well, some strideouts, 5k race, cool down a bit, then, one of the following:

a. Hill work, 1-mile warmup; 9 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start; repeat 8 times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds and then do your 1-mile easy cool-down.

2. Five times 3:00, at mile pace for 5k, with two minute jog in between, then cooldown

3. Repetiions: Three times six minutes, at 5k race pace, six minutes easy jogging in between, then cooldown

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day 3

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, try one of the following:

1. 6 x 300 meters, with each one faster than one before, then cooldown

2. 4 x 3 minutes at 5k race pace, with three minutes easy, then cooldown

3. 5k course loop, sprint 100 meters, jog 100 meters, do that the entire course, then, cooldown

Sunday: Easy 7-10-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are switching over to racing.

Cherono_GladysPC-Berlin15.JPG

Gladys Cherono, photo by PhotoRun.net

Cathal Dennehy wrote this piece for RunBlogRun after the BMW Berlin Press Conference for Women today. Remember, you can follow RunBlogRun's social live coverage on Berlin Sunday, September 27, 2015 at http://live.runblogrun.com/Event/BMW_BERLIN_MARATHON_on_SEPTEMBER_27_2015.

Watch for our piece on the men's presser tomorrow.

GWR2014-823.jpgGreat WinterRun, photo by Stan Vernon/Vernon Photography

Week 15, Day 4, September 23, 2015, Thursday: Race Day 2

1. Race Day, warm up well, some strideouts, 5k race, cool down a bit, then, one of the following:

a. Hill work, 1-mile warmup; 9 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start; repeat 8 times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds and then do your 1-mile easy cool-down.

2. Five times 3:00, at mile pace for 5k, with two minute jog in between, then cooldown

3. Repetiions: Three times six minutes, at 5k race pace, six minutes easy jogging in between, then cooldown

Week 15: Racing in Earnest!

The next two weeks are key to you and your team's success. We will pre supose that you have races on Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday. As this is very early season, we will provide alternate workouts for those days, plus work to do after the races. Stress warm ups and cooldowns. Stress team running. Realize that if your goals are to race well at conference and beyond, then, the early meets are part of your training and callousing.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: Race Day 1

Here are three options for this day of the week:

1. Race Day

a. Warm up, with one to two miles, and some stride outs, 5k race, then, one of the following:

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Repetions: after race, four times five minutes at 5k race pace, with easy five minutes recovery in between, long cooldown, 2-3 miles

3. Fartlek: after race, 40 minutes of 2 minutes on, 2 minutes off, repeat ten times, 2 minutes on is at 5k race pace, then, nice easy cooldown.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Race Day 2

1. Race Day, warm up well, some strideouts, 5k race, cool down a bit, then, one of the following:

a. Hill work, 1-mile warmup; 9 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start; repeat 8 times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds and then do your 1-mile easy cool-down.

2. Five times 3:00, at mile pace for 5k, with two minute jog in between, then cooldown

3. Repetiions: Three times six minutes, at 5k race pace, six minutes easy jogging in between, then cooldown

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day 3

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, try one of the following:

1. 6 x 300 meters, with each one faster than one before, then cooldown

2. 4 x 3 minutes at 5k race pace, with three minutes easy, then cooldown

3. 5k course loop, sprint 100 meters, jog 100 meters, do that the entire course, then, cooldown

Sunday: Easy 7-10-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are switching over to racing.

Eliud Kipchoge won his first World Championships in 2003.

Since then, he has raced around the world in track, cross country, and most recently, Eliud has moved to the roads. KIpchoge took his time building up to the marathon. He was not an overnight success at the marathon, at least, not to his standards.

Then, in October 2014, he won the Chicago Marathon with such style and flourish that the world saw his potential. In April 2015, in his epic battle with Wilson Kipsang and Dennis Kimetto, Eliud KIpchoge won London and spoke to the media on importance of taking your time moving up through the sport. Kipchoge spoke of cross country and track as building blocks for the marathoner.

And now, on September 27, 2015, Eliud Kipchoge will race at BMW Berlin for the second time. In 2013, he did not win. This year, KIpchoge has a mission: a win, and to run, very, very fast.

Watch Eliud Kipchoge's smile near the end of the race.

That will tell you if he has accomplished his goal.

Special thanks to the Shoe Addicts on their teaser video for the race on Sunday.

Watch RunBlogRun.com/Live coverage on your mobile on Sunday and get all of the info you need as the race progresses!

GWR2014-898.jpgA warm greeting, photo by Stan Vernon/Vernon Photography for @Great_Run

Week 15, Day 3, September 23, 2015, Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Week 15: Racing in Earnest!

The next two weeks are key to you and your team's success. We will pre supose that you have races on Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday. As this is very early season, we will provide alternate workouts for those days, plus work to do after the races. Stress warm ups and cooldowns. Stress team running. Realize that if your goals are to race well at conference and beyond, then, the early meets are part of your training and callousing.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: Race Day 1

Here are three options for this day of the week:

1. Race Day

a. Warm up, with one to two miles, and some stride outs, 5k race, then, one of the following:

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Repetions: after race, four times five minutes at 5k race pace, with easy five minutes recovery in between, long cooldown, 2-3 miles

3. Fartlek: after race, 40 minutes of 2 minutes on, 2 minutes off, repeat ten times, 2 minutes on is at 5k race pace, then, nice easy cooldown.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Race Day 2

1. Race Day, warm up well, some strideouts, 5k race, cool down a bit, then, one of the following:

a. Hill work, 1-mile warmup; 9 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start; repeat 8 times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds and then do your 1-mile easy cool-down.

2. Five times 3:00, at mile pace for 5k, with two minute jog in between, then cooldown

3. Repetiions: Three times six minutes, at 5k race pace, six minutes easy jogging in between, then cooldown

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day 3

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, try one of the following:

1. 6 x 300 meters, with each one faster than one before, then cooldown

2. 4 x 3 minutes at 5k race pace, with three minutes easy, then cooldown

3. 5k course loop, sprint 100 meters, jog 100 meters, do that the entire course, then, cooldown

Sunday: Easy 7-10-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are switching over to racing.

Hill_RyanFV1-USAout15.JPgRyan Hill, Ben True, USA 5000m champs, June 2015, photo by PhotoRun.net

True_BenFHL1-NyDL15.jpgBen True, Nick Willis in adidas 5000 meters, June 2015, photo by PhotoRun.net

In Ryan Hill and Ben True, one sees two of America's top middle distance runners. Hill has been under the watchful and thoughtful eye of Jerry Schumacher, and Ben True is under the thoughtful eye of Tim Broe. Hugely different approaches to coaching and life, but for these athletes, the right stuff.

Cathal Dennehy watched both Hill and True, and Rupp at the recent Brussels Meeting. The end of the season, and a long season it has been, is fraught with peaks, valleys, good races and some not so good.

This was a good ending for Hill and True.

Here is Cathal's story on both athletes, who, I believe, will pay prominent roles in stories in on our sport in 2016.

Ritzenhein_DathanH-BostonM15.JPgDathan Ritzenhein, Boston Marathon 2015, photo by PhotoRun.net

I first saw Dathan Ritzenhein race as a sophomore in high school at the Foot Locker MidWest Regional. It has been fun to watch Dathan mature as both an athlete and as a human being. Now a father and husband, Dathan is training for what is probably his last Olympic Trials.

Here is a thoughtful piece on Dathan Ritzenhein as he builds to February 2016 and the U.S. Olympic Team Trials for the Marathon.

Justin Lagat writes this piece on the current local road racing season in Kenya, which goes from September to December. A nice break from the track and road travel around the world that many Kenyans do or aspire to do. Justin Lagat also hosts a website, Kenyanathlete.com.

Justin just finished covering the World Champs for us, providing a view from Kenya during that time. With all of Kenya's successes, from Nicholas Bett to Julius Yego to Vivian Cheriuyut, Justin was quite busy with up to three columns in a day!

Korikwiang_Pauline-CinqueXC08.jpgPauline Korikwiang, Cinque XC 2008, photo by PhotoRun.net

Kipchoge_EliudH-Berlin13.JPGEliud Kipchoge, BMW Berlin, September 2013, photo by PhotoRun.net

With his victories in Chicago 2014 and London 2015, Eliud Kipchoge has his eyes set on running very fast in Berlin and improving not only his position there, but also, his personal best. Kipchoge, after his win last April in London, went on to express how marathoners need to develop "Old School": through cross country, track and then, moving up to the marathon.

Cathal Dennehy wrote this piece on why Berlin is so darn fast, and his five reasons make sense!

GWR2014-719.jpgChris Derrick, en route to his win at Great WinterRun, Edinburgh, Scotland, January 2014, photo by Stan Vernon/Vernon Photography for @GreatRun

Week 15, Day 2, September 22, 2015, Tuesday: Race Day 1

Here are three options for this day of the week:

1. Race Day

a. Warm up, with one to two miles, and some stride outs, 5k race, then, one of the following:

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Repetions: after race, four times five minutes at 5k race pace, with easy five minutes recovery in between, long cooldown, 2-3 miles

3. Fartlek: after race, 40 minutes of 2 minutes on, 2 minutes off, repeat ten times, 2 minutes on is at 5k race pace, then, nice easy cooldown.

Week 15: Racing in Earnest!

The next two weeks are key to you and your team's success. We will pre supose that you have races on Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday. As this is very early season, we will provide alternate workouts for those days, plus work to do after the races. Stress warm ups and cooldowns. Stress team running. Realize that if your goals are to race well at conference and beyond, then, the early meets are part of your training and callousing.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: Race Day 1

Here are three options for this day of the week:

1. Race Day

a. Warm up, with one to two miles, and some stride outs, 5k race, then, one of the following:

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Repetions: after race, four times five minutes at 5k race pace, with easy five minutes recovery in between, long cooldown, 2-3 miles

3. Fartlek: after race, 40 minutes of 2 minutes on, 2 minutes off, repeat ten times, 2 minutes on is at 5k race pace, then, nice easy cooldown.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Race Day 2

1. Race Day, warm up well, some strideouts, 5k race, cool down a bit, then, one of the following:

a. Hill work, 1-mile warmup; 9 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start; repeat 8 times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds and then do your 1-mile easy cool-down.

2. Five times 3:00, at mile pace for 5k, with two minute jog in between, then cooldown

3. Repetiions: Three times six minutes, at 5k race pace, six minutes easy jogging in between, then cooldown

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day 3

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, try one of the following:

1. 6 x 300 meters, with each one faster than one before, then cooldown

2. 4 x 3 minutes at 5k race pace, with three minutes easy, then cooldown

3. 5k course loop, sprint 100 meters, jog 100 meters, do that the entire course, then, cooldown

Sunday: Easy 7-10-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are switching over to racing.

Huling_Torrence_Ritzenhein_Huddle_Flanagan_Sisson_USA-5K_2015_Lotsbom.jpg

PHOTO: (From left to right): The podium finishers from the 2015 USA 5-K Championships: Dan Huling, David Torrence, Dathan Ritzenhein, Molly Huddle, Shalane Flanagan and Emily Sisson (photo by Chris Lotsbom for Race Results Weekly, ued with permission).
The USA 5k Champs had drama in both races. Here is Chris Lotsbom's take on the battle in Providence on Sunday, September 20.
Torrence_Huling_Ritzenhein_USA_5K_2015_Lotsbom.jpg
PHOTO: (From left to right): The podium finishers from the 2015 USA 5-K Championships: Dan Huling, David Torrence, Dathan Ritzenhein, Molly Huddle, Shalane Flanagan and Emily Sisson (photo by Chris Lotsbom for Race Results Weekly).

GWR2014-837.jpgGreat Winter Run, Edinburgh, Scotland, January 2014, photo by Stan Vernon, Vernon Photography for @Great_Run

Week 15, Day 1, September 21, 2015, Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Week 15: Racing in Earnest!

The next two weeks are key to you and your team's success. We will pre supose that you have races on Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday. As this is very early season, we will provide alternate workouts for those days, plus work to do after the races. Stress warm ups and cooldowns. Stress team running. Realize that if your goals are to race well at conference and beyond, then, the early meets are part of your training and callousing.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: Race Day 1

Here are three options for this day of the week:

1. Race Day

a. Warm up, with one to two miles, and some stride outs, 5k race, then, one of the following:

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Repetions: after race, four times five minutes at 5k race pace, with easy five minutes recovery in between, long cooldown, 2-3 miles

3. Fartlek: after race, 40 minutes of 2 minutes on, 2 minutes off, repeat ten times, 2 minutes on is at 5k race pace, then, nice easy cooldown.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Race Day 2

1. Race Day, warm up well, some strideouts, 5k race, cool down a bit, then, one of the following:

a. Hill work, 1-mile warmup; 9 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start; repeat 8 times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds and then do your 1-mile easy cool-down.

2. Five times 3:00, at mile pace for 5k, with two minute jog in between, then cooldown

3. Repetiions: Three times six minutes, at 5k race pace, six minutes easy jogging in between, then cooldown

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day 3

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, try one of the following:

1. 6 x 300 meters, with each one faster than one before, then cooldown

2. 4 x 3 minutes at 5k race pace, with three minutes easy, then cooldown

3. 5k course loop, sprint 100 meters, jog 100 meters, do that the entire course, then, cooldown

Sunday: Easy 7-10-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are switching over to racing.

Cathal Dennehy wrote this piece right after the World Champs after considering the doping issues from this past summer. I was there for several exchanges with Justin Gatlin, that I feel were, well, just pretty ridiculous. At times, it seems to me, that some want nothing but a confrontation on video, which is what happened in Eugene at the US Nationals, and after the 200 meters in Beijing.

SebCoe91415.jpgSeb Coe, September 2015, photo by PhotoRun.net

I believe that there is as much bad information out in the public, and media, as is good information. The release of the blood passports are a huge law suit waiting to happen. I sure hope that the media organizations behind those have great liability insurance.

The problem is many fold. It is decades old. In the beginning, no sports federations, amatuer or professional, took doping seriously. Without the Ben Johnson affair, the sport would have gotten even dirtier. Now, in frustation, media organizations strike out as they are given nothing that they can understand, communicate to readers and they see this lack of information, as the so called protectors of the sport being as guilty as the cheaters.

I am publishing Cathal's piece because I think, as it should be always, Mr. Dennehy presents both sides. What is Justin Gatlin supposed to say? Daphne Schippers is a talented young women, who I refer to now as the Netherland's Usain Bolt. Amel Tuka, coached by Gianni Ghedini, has developed quickly and amazingly, but when you hear that he was probably training quite poorly, one can see improvement, with someone, obviously with huge talent.

The problem is that no one has confidence in the current culture around drug testing and punishments. This is Seb Coe's cross to bear during his reign as IAAF President. Nothing else comes near the importance of this part of his job. For without an effective, trusted and well explained drug testing program, which has the legal limit on punishments to all involved, the media will hound the global federation, not because it is the right thing to do, but, for some, it is the easy story.

Doping in athletics has become the easy story.

GWR2014-734.jpgChris Derrick, Great Winter Run, XC 2014, photo by Vernon Photography

Week 14, Day 7, September 20, 2015, Sunday: Easy 7-10-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are switching over to racing.

Week 14: Racing in Earnest!

The next two weeks are key to you and your team's success. We will pre supose that you have races on Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday. As this is very early season, we will provide alternate workouts for those days, plus work to do after the races. Stress warm ups and cooldowns. Stress team running. Realize that if your goals are to race well at conference and beyond, then, the early meets are part of your training and callousing.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: Race Day 1

Here are three options for this day of the week:

1. Race Day

a. Warm up, with one to two miles, and some stride outs, 5k race, then, one of the following:

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Repetions: after race, four times five minutes at 5k race pace, with easy five minutes recovery in between, long cooldown, 2-3 miles

3. Fartlek: after race, 40 minutes of 2 minutes on, 2 minutes off, repeat ten times, 2 minutes on is at 5k race pace, then, nice easy cooldown.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Race Day 2

1. Race Day, warm up well, some strideouts, 5k race, cool down a bit, then, one of the following:

a. Hill work, 1-mile warmup; 9 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start; repeat 8 times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds and then do your 1-mile easy cool-down.

2. Five times 3:00, at mile pace for 5k, with two minute jog in between, then cooldown

3. Repetiions: Three times six minutes, at 5k race pace, six minutes easy jogging in between, then cooldown

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day 3

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, try one of the following:

1. 6 x 300 meters, with each one faster than one before, then cooldown

2. 4 x 3 minutes at 5k race pace, with three minutes easy, then cooldown

3. 5k course loop, sprint 100 meters, jog 100 meters, do that the entire course, then, cooldown

Sunday: Easy 7-10-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are switching over to racing.

11057727_10155771363760177_2647803955233939586_o.jpgQueen Harrison, ASICS sponsored athlete

ASICS announced its third leader of ASICS America in twenty-five years. Rich Bourne spent nineteen years at the helm of ASICS America, guiding them through some challenging times. Kevin Wulff spent his five years building that business, increasing sales to over $1 billion and developing the new corporate campus.

In both leaders, ASICS had leadership with very different styles.

In naming this third corporate leader, ASICS Worldwide has picked a man who has experience from all sides of the sport. A former miler with the Florida Track Club, Gene McCarthy guided Brand Jordan through some challenging times, then, moved onto Reebok, and helped build that brand. His time at Timberland, Under Armour and Merrell make him one of most experienced executives in this footwear culture.

Gene McCarthy is cheerleader, salesman, and tactical leader. At ease in front of a crowd, Gene can do the talk and do the walk.

Mens GEL Quantum 360 Turquoise.jpgASICS Quantum 360, launched July 2015

The challenge for ASICS Worldwide is that, still, many consider it the sleeping giant. The quality of ASICS product is unquestioned. What ASICS America has done is allow ASICS to increase its loyalty base, and evolve the global culture to meet needs in the local communities.

Gene McCarthy starts at ASICS on October 1.

Kevin Wulff leaves ASICS America before the end of the year.

Many eyes will be watching ASICS as they begin the next part of their journey.

Yego_JuliusWL-WorldCH15.jpgJulius Yego, photo by PhotoRun.net

Julius Yego woke many up with his fine throwing this season. A young man who took up the javelin, an event totally foreign to Kenyan athletes, and became the very best in the world, Julius Yego is an example of the varied talent in the country of Kenya. From middle distance running to long distance running, from the 400 meter hurdles to the javelin, Kenyan athletes are spreading their wings, and trying new events and new generations of athletes in Kenya are considering athletics.

In that same framework, Justin Lagat notes that the battle to control drug cheating has recieved support from the country's leaders, which is critical if the sport is not to be destroyed by this evil. Funding, consistent testing and draconian punishments are key to crushing the danger that doping can do to our sport.

Here is Justin's fine column from last week.

GWR2014-448.jpgGreat Winter Run 2014, photo by Vernon Photography

Racing multiple times in a week is part of the cross country culture. Use those races to build up your racing prowess, team focus and remember, it is the end of season that counts.

Week 14, Day 5, September 19, 2015, Saturday: Race Day 3

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, try one of the following:

1. 6 x 300 meters, with each one faster than one before, then cooldown

2. 4 x 3 minutes at 5k race pace, with three minutes easy, then cooldown

3. 5k course loop, sprint 100 meters, jog 100 meters, do that the entire course, then, cooldown

Week 14: Racing in Earnest!

The next two weeks are key to you and your team's success. We will pre supose that you have races on Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday. As this is very early season, we will provide alternate workouts for those days, plus work to do after the races. Stress warm ups and cooldowns. Stress team running. Realize that if your goals are to race well at conference and beyond, then, the early meets are part of your training and callousing.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: Race Day 1

Here are three options for this day of the week:

1. Race Day

a. Warm up, with one to two miles, and some stride outs, 5k race, then, one of the following:

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Repetions: after race, four times five minutes at 5k race pace, with easy five minutes recovery in between, long cooldown, 2-3 miles

3. Fartlek: after race, 40 minutes of 2 minutes on, 2 minutes off, repeat ten times, 2 minutes on is at 5k race pace, then, nice easy cooldown.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Race Day 2

1. Race Day, warm up well, some strideouts, 5k race, cool down a bit, then, one of the following:

a. Hill work, 1-mile warmup; 9 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start; repeat 8 times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds and then do your 1-mile easy cool-down.

2. Five times 3:00, at mile pace for 5k, with two minute jog in between, then cooldown

3. Repetiions: Three times six minutes, at 5k race pace, six minutes easy jogging in between, then cooldown

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day 3

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, try one of the following:

1. 6 x 300 meters, with each one faster than one before, then cooldown

2. 4 x 3 minutes at 5k race pace, with three minutes easy, then cooldown

3. 5k course loop, sprint 100 meters, jog 100 meters, do that the entire course, then, cooldown

Sunday: Easy 7-10-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are switching over to racing.

Moser_Treniere1-USout15.JPG

Treniere Moser, 2015 USATF Outdoor, photo by PhotoRun.net

Week 14, Day 5, September 18, 2015, Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Week 14: Racing in Earnest!

The next two weeks are key to you and your team's success. We will pre supose that you have races on Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday. As this is very early season, we will provide alternate workouts for those days, plus work to do after the races. Stress warm ups and cooldowns. Stress team running. Realize that if your goals are to race well at conference and beyond, then, the early meets are part of your training and callousing.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: Race Day 1

Here are three options for this day of the week:

1. Race Day

a. Warm up, with one to two miles, and some stride outs, 5k race, then, one of the following:

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Repetions: after race, four times five minutes at 5k race pace, with easy five minutes recovery in between, long cooldown, 2-3 miles

3. Fartlek: after race, 40 minutes of 2 minutes on, 2 minutes off, repeat ten times, 2 minutes on is at 5k race pace, then, nice easy cooldown.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Race Day 2

1. Race Day, warm up well, some strideouts, 5k race, cool down a bit, then, one of the following:

a. Hill work, 1-mile warmup; 9 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start; repeat 8 times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds and then do your 1-mile easy cool-down.

2. Five times 3:00, at mile pace for 5k, with two minute jog in between, then cooldown

3. Repetiions: Three times six minutes, at 5k race pace, six minutes easy jogging in between, then cooldown

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day 3

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, try one of the following:

1. 6 x 300 meters, with each one faster than one before, then cooldown

2. 4 x 3 minutes at 5k race pace, with three minutes easy, then cooldown

3. 5k course loop, sprint 100 meters, jog 100 meters, do that the entire course, then, cooldown

Sunday: Easy 7-10-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are switching over to racing.

Jodie Williams is one of the finest young sprinters coming out of Great Britain.

Except, Jodie won 151 straight races from 2006 to 2010, along with winning the 2009 World Youth Championships at 100m and 200m, the 2010 World Junior Championships at 100m and 200m, the 2011 European Junior Championships at 100m and 200m, and the 2013 European U 23 Championships at 200m.

Williams_JodieFL-Euros14.jpgJodie Williams, photo by PhotoRun.net

In 2014, after dealing with injuries in 2013, Jodie Williams medaled in both the Commonwealth Games and the European Games, taking silver medals in both 200 meters (22.50 in CG, 22.46 in Europeans), a bronze in the CG 4x100m and a the gold in the 2014 European Champs 4x100m, with NR of 42.25.

In 2015, faced with injuries, Jodie Williams rounded into shape during the World Champs and helped the GBR team not only finish in 4th, but set a new British record in the 4x100 meters of 42.10.

The following interview was done after one of Jodie's last races of 2015, the Great City Games in Newcastle, UK. This interview was done on Saturday, September 12, 2015.

WomenEarlyLead-FifthAve15.JPGFifth Avenue Mile, Elite Women, photo by PhotoRun.net

Willis_NickFHL-5thAve15.jpgNick Willis wins the Fifth Avenue Mile, Elite Men, photo by PhotoRun.net

The Fifth Avenue mile has been a tradition in the Big Apple for thirty-five years. Many of the greatest milers and middle distance runners have run the twenty blocks on Fifth Avenue in mid September over the years.

Jeff Benjamin covered the Fifth Avenue mile for RunBlogRun last Sunday, September 13. Here is his story...

Dibaba_GenzebeFV-Beijing15.JPGGenzebe Dibaba, photo by PhotoRun.net

Genzebe Dibaba went into the World Champs with the goal of completed a 5000 meter and 1,500 meter double, and she did. One she took the gold, and in one, she took the bronze. Genzebe Dibaba came out of the Champs as one tired runner.

In this interview, Genzebe Dibaba discusses with Sabrina Yohannes her desire to double in Portland, Oregon in the World Indoors!

GWR2014-803.jpgGreatWinterRun, Edinburgh, Scotland, January 2014, photo by Vernon Photography for GreatRunCompany

Racing is the icing on the cake. But, like making a great cake, time and preparation goes into it. The early season cross country racing is a chance to take into consideration your fitness and how to fine tune and callous oneself over the last ten weeks of the season.

Week 14, Day Four, September 16, 2015, Thursday: Race Day 2

1. Race Day, warm up well, some strideouts, 5k race, cool down a bit, then, one of the following:

a. Hill work, 1-mile warmup; 9 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start; repeat 8 times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds and then do your 1-mile easy cool-down.

2. Five times 3:00, at mile pace for 5k, with two minute jog in between, then cooldown

3. Repetiions: Three times six minutes, at 5k race pace, six minutes easy jogging in between, then cooldown

Week 14: Racing in Earnest!

The next two weeks are key to you and your team's success. We will pre supose that you have races on Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday. As this is very early season, we will provide alternate workouts for those days, plus work to do after the races. Stress warm ups and cooldowns. Stress team running. Realize that if your goals are to race well at conference and beyond, then, the early meets are part of your training and callousing.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: Race Day 1

Here are three options for this day of the week:

1. Race Day

a. Warm up, with one to two miles, and some stride outs, 5k race, then, one of the following:

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Repetions: after race, four times five minutes at 5k race pace, with easy five minutes recovery in between, long cooldown, 2-3 miles

3. Fartlek: after race, 40 minutes of 2 minutes on, 2 minutes off, repeat ten times, 2 minutes on is at 5k race pace, then, nice easy cooldown.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Race Day 2

1. Race Day, warm up well, some strideouts, 5k race, cool down a bit, then, one of the following:

a. Hill work, 1-mile warmup; 9 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start; repeat 8 times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds and then do your 1-mile easy cool-down.

2. Five times 3:00, at mile pace for 5k, with two minute jog in between, then cooldown

3. Repetiions: Three times six minutes, at 5k race pace, six minutes easy jogging in between, then cooldown

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day 3

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, try one of the following:

1. 6 x 300 meters, with each one faster than one before, then cooldown

2. 4 x 3 minutes at 5k race pace, with three minutes easy, then cooldown

3. 5k course loop, sprint 100 meters, jog 100 meters, do that the entire course, then, cooldown

Sunday: Easy 7-10-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are switching over to racing.

Sanders-Centrowitz-Coghlan-Millrose15.JPgNorb Sanders, Matthew Centrowitz, Eamonn Coghlan, 2015 Millrose Games, photo by PhotoRun.net

Eamonn Coghlan has legendary status at the Millrose Games and Meadowlands. I remember watching him win the 1983 World Champs 5,000 meters, and his elation on finally winning a global title. It was hard fought, as I had recalled him placing fourth in the 1976 Olympic 1,500m and 1980 Olympic 5,000m.

For me, watching Eamonn race in the Meadowlands in the mid 1980s on a Saturday night, then, racing the NYRR 20 miler on Sunday, through the snowy Central Park, was a true highlight.

Here is an excellent piece on the Chairman of the Boards by David Hunter, who, we hope, has recovered from the jet lag brought on by two weeks in Beijing, China.

GWR2014-873.jpgGreat Winter Run, Edinburgh, January 2014, photo by Vernon Photography for GreatRunCompany

Week 14, Day 3, September 16, 2015, Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Week 14: Racing in Earnest!

The next two weeks are key to you and your team's success. We will pre supose that you have races on Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday. As this is very early season, we will provide alternate workouts for those days, plus work to do after the races. Stress warm ups and cooldowns. Stress team running. Realize that if your goals are to race well at conference and beyond, then, the early meets are part of your training and callousing.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: Race Day 1

Here are three options for this day of the week:

1. Race Day

a. Warm up, with one to two miles, and some stride outs, 5k race, then, one of the following:

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Repetions: after race, four times five minutes at 5k race pace, with easy five minutes recovery in between, long cooldown, 2-3 miles

3. Fartlek: after race, 40 minutes of 2 minutes on, 2 minutes off, repeat ten times, 2 minutes on is at 5k race pace, then, nice easy cooldown.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Race Day 2

1. Race Day, warm up well, some strideouts, 5k race, cool down a bit, then, one of the following:

a. Hill work, 1-mile warmup; 9 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start; repeat 8 times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds and then do your 1-mile easy cool-down.

2. Five times 3:00, at mile pace for 5k, with two minute jog in between, then cooldown

3. Repetiions: Three times six minutes, at 5k race pace, six minutes easy jogging in between, then cooldown

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day 3

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, try one of the following:

1. 6 x 300 meters, with each one faster than one before, then cooldown

2. 4 x 3 minutes at 5k race pace, with three minutes easy, then cooldown

3. 5k course loop, sprint 100 meters, jog 100 meters, do that the entire course, then, cooldown

Sunday: Easy 7-10-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are switching over to racing.

Rutherford_Greg1c-Beijing15.JPGGreg Rutherford, gold medal, World Championships, Long Jump, Beijing, photo by PhotoRun.net

John Godina was one of the greatest shot putter/discus throwers in our sports history. What many do not seem to appreciate is that besides a huge work ethic, and a superb coach (Art Venegas), John Godina is one of those guys who just will not give up.

Godina has taken that drive and put it into Altis. When one speaks to John about his dream and the launch of that dream facility, it is obvious that this guy has the focus, drive and work ethic to make it happen.

Altis, as the article below states, from our fave SPIKES magazine (powered by IAAF.org), would have been a top ten country with its medal haul.

Mike Rodgers is the hardest working man in sprinting.

Over the last weekend of the season, Mike raced 100 meters in Brussels, then, sixteen hours later, raced in Gateshead, England, then, sixteen hours after that, raced the 100 meters at the Deca Nation in France.

Rodgers_Mike-PreC15.jpgMike Rodgers, photo by PhotoRun.net

Mike Rodgers is one of the guys I see most on the circuit. He is always in the lobby of the host hotels, hanging out, working out, or racing. That is his life during the summers.

At Beijing, Mike Rodgers had a rough day in the office. When no one wanted to anchor on the 4x100 meters, Mike Rodgers took the position running against Usain Bolt. The team had been changed since the World Relays due to injuries and fitness among others reasons.

In the final of the 4x100 meter relay, Mike Rodgers took off about two steps early, and Tyson Gay could not catch him. Mike Rodgers could not stop in the zone and get the relay baton. Although he finished, the team was disqualified for an exchange out of the zone.

Mike takes the hit for the relay miscues, although, I am not sure he should. In the interview Mike Rodgers said it delicately: the athletes need to put the time in to get the baton around the track. I concur.

It is not the guys, it is the speed with which those hand offs are done. We take four of the fastest runners in the world and do not take the consideration that this is a treacherous activity that must be practiced? One of two track camps is not the time needed in to be successful in a pressure cooker Global final. The faster the team, the more work involved.

We need to get past the idea that because these guys can run fast over 100 meters means that they can successfully transport a baton around the track, in the legal exchange zones, while running fast. These are different skill sets. This is coaching.

This is a coaching and administrative issue.

Get the four to six best guys, not fastest, but guys who can run relay best and take the year needed to kick butt. They should sleep with the baton. It is their friend. They need to practice mistakes, miscues and recover.

In Beijing, if the last hand off had gone well, the US would have been in the fight and it would have taken 37.2 or 3 to win. That would have been a race, not the route shown.

I am sure if NIKE put up serious $$ for four men to practice all year (two subs) and the goal is to win the 4x100m that this would be solved in a heart beat.

Mike Rodgers was interviewed by me just after his 100 meter victory in Gateshead. One of my favorites, we have a nice time catching up.

Dafne Schippers is the best women sprinter in Europe.

That is a fact.

After her victory in Beijing, Dafne Schippers was considered among the very best in the best 200 meter runners in the world.

In Brussels, Dafne Schippers defeated Allyson Felix over 200 meters, another reason to consider this women the Usain Bolt of women's sprinting. Her tall frame and her speed are perfectly paired to take on the furlong. Her wins in the World Champs and at the Diamond League finals showed her supreme fitness.

Schippers_DafneFH-Brussels15.jpgDafne Schippers vs. Allyson Felix, September 11, 2015, photo by PhotoRun.net

Until recently a heptathlete, Dafne Schippers is as amused as we are with her new found popularity in the Netherlands. "After Beijing, when I walk my dog, people stop me to talk to me." noted Dafne Schippers, in a tone that tells one that this young women was truly surprised on the response to her coming out as a world class sprinter.

At the Great CityGames, Dafne Schippers ran 11.03 in the cold and rain, less than 16 hours after winning the 200 meters in Brussels, and defeating Allyson Felix.

Look at the picture above. Allyson Felix does not give races away. She worked hard, and, alas, it was not her night. What is probably means is that we, the track fans, will hopefully get to see a titanic rematch over 200 meters by Ms. Felix and Ms. Schippers.

From Brussels to Newcastle was an early morning flight. Actually, two flights. It should be noted that Schippers had perhaps three hours sleep between performances.

But, that is youth!

Here is the interview that we did with Dafne after her 100 meter victory on Saturday, September 12, in Gateshead, England.

Men400mLead-FifthAve15.JPGThe NYRR Elite Fifth avenue Mile, September 13, 2015, photo by PhotoRun.net

As you get into the early season, races are everywhere. Many high school teams have 2-3 races a week in late September to early October. Here is how to use them to your advantage!

Week 14, Day 2, September 15, 2015, Tuesday: Race Day 1

Here are three options for this day of the week:

1. Race Day

a. Warm up, with one to two miles, and some stride outs, 5k race, then, one of the following:

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Repetions: after race, four times five minutes at 5k race pace, with easy five minutes recovery in between, long cooldown, 2-3 miles

3. Fartlek: after race, 40 minutes of 2 minutes on, 2 minutes off, repeat ten times, 2 minutes on is at 5k race pace, then, nice easy cooldown.

Week 14: Racing in Earnest!

The next two weeks are key to you and your team's success. We will pre supose that you have races on Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday. As this is very early season, we will provide alternate workouts for those days, plus work to do after the races. Stress warm ups and cooldowns. Stress team running. Realize that if your goals are to race well at conference and beyond, then, the early meets are part of your training and callousing.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: Race Day 1

Here are three options for this day of the week:

1. Race Day

a. Warm up, with one to two miles, and some stride outs, 5k race, then, one of the following:

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Repetions: after race, four times five minutes at 5k race pace, with easy five minutes recovery in between, long cooldown, 2-3 miles

3. Fartlek: after race, 40 minutes of 2 minutes on, 2 minutes off, repeat ten times, 2 minutes on is at 5k race pace, then, nice easy cooldown.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Race Day 2

1. Race Day, warm up well, some strideouts, 5k race, cool down a bit, then, one of the following:

a. Hill work, 1-mile warmup; 9 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start; repeat 8 times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds and then do your 1-mile easy cool-down.

2. Five times 3:00, at mile pace for 5k, with two minute jog in between, then cooldown

3. Repetiions: Three times six minutes, at 5k race pace, six minutes easy jogging in between, then cooldown

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day 3

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, try one of the following:

1. 6 x 300 meters, with each one faster than one before, then cooldown

2. 4 x 3 minutes at 5k race pace, with three minutes easy, then cooldown

3. 5k course loop, sprint 100 meters, jog 100 meters, do that the entire course, then, cooldown

Sunday: Easy 7-10-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are switching over to racing.

SebCoe91415.jpgSeb Coe speaking to IAAF staff, 14 September 2015, photo from Getty Images for IAAF

Seb Coe comes to the IAAF leadership at a time that is highly critical for the sport. With the constant bombardment of media, some well-meaning and some, ill-informed, the sport of athletics is under scrutiny like never before.

Even those who consider themselves the biggest fans and supporters of the sport are concerned. Seb Coe has to manage the sport through these minefields on a daily basis. He will be challenged, attacked, ridiculed and he will need to keep his cool.

The truth is, Seb Coe is right. He was made for this job. He was born for this job. HIs skill set, developed from his Olympic experiences, to his athletic development, to his time in Parliment, to his time managing the London 2012 effort will all be called on.

There are times that Seb Coe, for the best of the sport, will have to call issues in the past into question, and break with that past. There are times that Seb Coe, for the best of the sport, will have to find a way to explain the challenges of enforcing an effective drug testing policy while living in a modern world of European law, American and English jurisprudence.

And he will have to do it with a sense of humor, a smile, and a thoughtful discussion.

There will also be times that Seb Coe may have to say, " I do not know, or I do not have an answer right now, let me get back to you."

And, get back to the person.

All skills that Seb Coe possesses in droves, but all skills that will be required each and every day that he manages our amazing and complex sport.

At RunBlogRun, the Running Network and Fortius Media Group, we wish Seb Coe and his fine staff the best of luck.

Our sport needs strong leadership in these exciting times.

Kuijeken-Simpson-Rowbury-FifthAve15.JPGThe NYRR Fifth Avenue Mile, September 13, 2015, photo by PhotoRun.net

The milers above all had or do have relationships with the cross country season. It is part of their build up for the Spring season and Summer season. In itself, it is a team sport that allows runners to run for a common goal. In itself, you build up your strength and endurance to focus on the upcoming track season.

Right now, though, focus on league, conference and beyond!

September 14, 2015, Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Week 14: Racing in Earnest!

The next two weeks are key to you and your team's success. We will pre supose that you have races on Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday. As this is very early season, we will provide alternate workouts for those days, plus work to do after the races. Stress warm ups and cooldowns. Stress team running. Realize that if your goals are to race well at conference and beyond, then, the early meets are part of your training and callousing.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: Race Day 1

Here are three options for this day of the week:

1. Race Day

a. Warm up, with one to two miles, and some stride outs, 5k race, then, one of the following:

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Repetions: after race, four times five minutes at 5k race pace, with easy five minutes recovery in between, long cooldown, 2-3 miles

3. Fartlek: after race, 40 minutes of 2 minutes on, 2 minutes off, repeat ten times, 2 minutes on is at 5k race pace, then, nice easy cooldown.

See options above.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Race Day 2

1. Race Day, warm up well, some strideouts, 5k race, cool down a bit, then, one of the following:

a. Hill work, 1-mile warmup; 9 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start; repeat 8 times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds and then do your 1-mile easy cool-down.

2. Five times 3:00, at mile pace for 5k, with two minute jog in between, then cooldown

3. Repetiions: Three times six minutes, at 5k race pace, six minutes easy jogging in between, then cooldown

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day 3

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, try one of the following:

1. 6 x 300 meters, with each one faster than one before, then cooldown

2. 4 x 3 minutes at 5k race pace, with three minutes easy, then cooldown

3. 5k course loop, sprint 100 meters, jog 100 meters, do that the entire course, then, cooldown

Sunday: Easy 7-10-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are switching over to racing.

Kuijken-Simpson-RowburyWide-FifthAve15.JPGKuijken, Simpson, Rowbury, Fifth Avenue Mile, photo by PhotoRun.net

Just as I was finishing my report on the Great North Run, the Fifth Avenue Mile was happening along the 20 blocks of the iconic avenue in the Big Apple. Jenny Simpson and Nick Willis won this fall race, that is the end of the track and field season in North America.

Here is Chris Lotsbom's feature on this fine race.

DibabaLedsKiprop-Kirwa-Worlds15.jpgMare Dibaba running for gold, photo by PhotoRun.net

For nearly ten days, Jeff Benjamin wrote a daily column on US coverage of the World Champs on television. Jeff is a track fan, and he had access to Universal as well as NBC.

This is his last column on the final two days of the World Championships. Jeff did a wonderful job in detaling the highlights and lowlights, in his eyes of the broadcasts.

In the end, successful sports television is story telling. The talent needs to weave a story of the athletes and the story of the events. While I believe that American coverage is getting better, I hope that NBC understands how many people love the sport.

Jeff Benjamin is right on his commentary. There were strong moments and there were moments of improvement. Special thanks to Jeff Benjamin, a long time writer for American Athletics, American Track & Field and RunBlogRun. His help is invaluable.

We would love to hear your comments. Send them to runblogrun@gmail.com. We will pass them on to the appropriate networks!

Keitany_Mary1a-Ottawa14.JPGMary Keitany, Ottowa, 2014, photo by PhotoRun.net

The field announced for the women's race made this an amazing field.

Then, it began to happen.

Between athletes pulling out and Federations tryingto control athletes, most of Mary Keitany's competitors went away.

Gemma Steel, the British hope, would be running by herself after awhile.

Farah_Mo1h-Lisbon15.JPGMo Farah, photo by PhotoRun.net

On a sunny day, with a light wind, and 41,486 actual runners, Mo Farah won the Great North Run, his second win here, in an epic battle with Stanley Biwott.

From our bird's eye view on the press truck, we watched the men's race from the start through miles ten, and then, from the finish, over the last mile.

For Mo Farah, this is a wonderful way to end 2015. After a challenging season, Mo Farah defended his Moscow double with wins over 10,000 meters and 5,000 meters .

Running 59:22, Mo won over Stanley Biwott by two seconds! This is Mo's PB, but will not count as a European record as the course is not record-worthy (road racing rules, sorry).

Centrowitz_Matthew-LondonDL15.JPgMatthew Centrowtiz, photo by PhotoRun.net

Matthew Centrowtiz is not the biggest fan of cross country racing. But, the fall training is part of his regimen and it produced three straight finals in World Champs (2011, 2013, 2015), two of them resulting in podium finishes.

Week 13, Day 7, September 13, 2015, Sunday: Easy 11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. (400 Mile: 8 miles/300 Mile: 7 miles)

Week 13: You've Made It!

You've now got 3 months of solid training behind you. Keep the days between racing and the hard days relaxed. Now it's time to focus on your racing. How are you feeling? When do you tire? When do you kick? Try some different race strategies.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, 1-mile cool-down. To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month.

See options above.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: 1-mile warmup; 9 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start; repeat 8 times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds and then do your 1-mile easy cool-down.

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Easy 3-mile run or a 5K race.

Sunday: Easy 11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. (400 Mile: 8 miles/300 Mile: 7 miles)

Week 13 Total (Final Miles): 500 Mile-53 miles (540.5); 400 Mile-35 (418.5) miles; 300 Mile-29 miles (332.5)

Farah_MoBoltPose-LondonDL15.JPgMo Farah, photo by PhotoRun.net

Mo Farah's season is about to end.

On Sunday, September 13, Mo Farah will run the Great North Run Half marathon. With 57,000 of his closest friends, Mo will run 13.1 miles faster than most people on the planet.

Will he set a European record? Will he set a World record?

Well, technically, he can't in Newcastle.

The course is a bit off the road regulations so a best could be achieved on the course, but not a world best.

Anyways, that means little.

Mo Farah won his 5000m/10,000m double in Beijing on top of being harassed all season over allegations against his Coach. A huge emotional cost, but somehow, Mo handled it, and ran brilliantly in Beijing.

This interview, quite fun, was done in Newcastle at the Newcastle United Grounds.

Enjoy!

Thumbnail image for Rutherford_Greg1a-Beijing15.jpgGreg Rutherford, photo by PhotoRun.net

Greg Rutherford is the master of his domain.

Concurrently, he holds the gold medals for the Olympic Games (2012), the Commonwealth Games (2014), the European Games (2014) and the World Champs (2015).

Greg got a bit of an injury at the World Champs, and made it through the Diamond League final. But, in warming up on Friday, he experienced a niggle that he was concerned about, and had to withdraw from the Great City Games on Saturday.

Instead, Greg Rutherford did BBC TV and spoke to fans and signed some autographs.

Here is the group interview we did with Greg Rutherford at the Newcastle United grounds on Friday, September 11, 2015.

Tamberi_Gianmarco-LondonDL15.JPgThe half bearded one-Gianmarco Tamberi, photo by PhotoRun.net

Alex Mills sent me this piece from Brussels. I looked at it and said, "You know, Alex is right on this one."

Alex has been writing for us for over a year now. He survived Beijing, then Zurich and now, Brussels. I hope he gets some sleep soon.

Nice piece, Alex.

Taylor_ChristianQ-World15.JPgChristian Taylor, photo by PhotoRun.net

Christian Taylor's 18.21 meter jump or 59 feet, nine inches from Beijing still runs through my head.

A fantastic jump in a fantastic competition.

Taylor and Pichardo thrive on each other.

When Pichardo gave up the ghost in Brussels, it was hard for Taylor to respond. But, he did and won the competition going away.

The next day, I saw Rana Reider, the coach of Taylor. Coach Reider told me that Taylor is in fantastic shape and that they had been training for another big one.

We will now have to wait until 2016...

The triple jump wars go on!

Stowers_Jasmine-Doha15.JPGJasmine Stowers, Doha DL, 2015, photo by PhotoRun.net

For some time, the 100 meter hurdles has, in my mind, been one of the most under appreciated events in the sport. To combine sprinting and hurdling, over the dynamic 100 meter distance, is an acquired skill and one that can be fraught with opportunities to err.

This is Stuart Weir's homage to the 100 meter hurdles in 2015.

And, he is right.

If you know who will be the 100 meter hurdle champion in Rio, then, by all means, get those bets on.

Schippers_DafneFL-World15.JPgDafne Schippers, photo by PhotoRun.net

After a World Championships, half a world a way mind you, performances are not expected to be anything special. But, as my keen observers told me, the crowd was sold out, and loud, the organization was crisp and there were some special battles.

The women's 200 meters is a look into Rio next year.

As Dafne told us after the Great City Games today, " I am now a sprinter."

Believe.

MenStart-5thAve13.JPGNYRR Fifth Avenue Mile, photo by PhotoRun.net

The Fifth Avenue Mile, for some time, has been the demarcation between track season and road season. A meeting of middle and long distance runners, the mile is a celebration of the sport. Six thousand participants from five to 15 times five will compete on Sunday, September 13 in the Big Apple.

Here is Chris Lotsbom's thoughts on how the race could develop tomorrow.

Felix_Allyson1c-Pre15.jpgAllyson Felix, photo by PhotoRun.net

Schippers_DaphneQ1a-Beijing15.jpgDafne Schippers, photo by PhotoRun.net

In the battle for Brussels, it came down to Schippers, Felix and Thompson, and Schippers won. Here are the results for Brussels, enjoy. But mark my word, the Battle in Rio will have these three wonderful athletes dueling over the furlong.

Wow!

Dynamo Hum!

Farah_Mo5kFLW-Beijing15.JPGMo Farah, after his 5000m victory, photo by PhotoRun.net

The journey of a 1000 miles begins with one step, as Lao Tse said a thousand plus years ago. The journey to elite distance running begins with the steps 15 to 17 years ago. Cross country is a great base, and a great way to develop a love and respect of our sport.

You are just starting the 2015 cross country season with 500,000 friends across the U.S. Enjoy the experience, savor the friendships being developed. They will last a lifetime.

Week 13, Day 6, September 12, 2015, Saturday: Easy 3-mile run or a 5K race. In a race, get out hard, and build up the pace, focusing on a strong finish. Take one person at a time. Remember, to warm up and cool down. Cooldown long, and remember to stretch.

Week 13: You've Made It!

You've now got 3 months of solid training behind you. Keep the days between racing and the hard days relaxed. Now it's time to focus on your racing. How are you feeling? When do you tire? When do you kick? Try some different race strategies.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, 1-mile cool-down. To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month.

See options above.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: 1-mile warmup; 9 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start; repeat 8 times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds and then do your 1-mile easy cool-down.

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Easy 3-mile run or a 5K race.

Sunday: Easy 11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. (400 Mile: 8 miles/300 Mile: 7 miles)

Week 13 Total (Final Miles): 500 Mile-53 miles (540.5); 400 Mile-35 (418.5) miles; 300 Mile-29 miles (332.5)

danielchebii.jpgDaniel Chebii, Winner Birell Prague GP 10k, September 4, 2015, photo by PhotoRun.net

Daniel Chebii won the Birell Prague GP 10k last Saturday, September 4, in 27:42, with some stiff competition. Here is an interview with Daniel by Andy Edwards of Race Results Service. Part of the reason why races succeed supporting elite athletes is when their stories connect with the readers and the sport. Race Results Service does a wonderful job of telling the stories behind the athletes.

We are fortunate to work with them!

Jepchirchir_Peres-Campaccio15.jpgPeres Jepchirchir, Campaccio, 2015, photo by PhotoRun.net

This is an interview provided to us by Race News Services, and Andy Edwards. Andy's interviews of the top athletes around the world provide us with little known information on the athletes. At the end of the day, our sport grows with the relationships we make, from near or far, with the stars of our sports. Andy Edward's thoughtful approach to the athletes in question, in this circumstance, the winner of the Prague GP 2015, provides us insights into this fine runner.

We thank Andy Edwards and his partners for this great story on Peres Jepchirchir.

gregandmo.jpg

Greg Rutherford, Mo Farah, Newcastle United football pitch, photo by Larry Eder

The ability to draw sports media to an event is an acquired skill. Some are good at it, some are, well, quite bad at it. The Great Run team were running on all cylinders when they brought Greg Rutherford, Mo Farah, Jo Pavey and Gemma Steel to the Newcastle United fieldhouse for the presser.

But that was not the story, nor the draw.

Mo Farah and Greg Rutherford were to try their skills against Peter Beardesly, Newcastle United coach, and former Liverpool footballer, who also wore the British vest many times. Greg was quite good at scoring, Mo was quite good at goal keeping and Peter Beardesly was old school, showing some tricks he has acquired over the years.

Paula Radcliffe has had a bad week.

She now should be doing much better. SKY News released a report that said she was NOT doping last night.

A staunch supporter of efforts to clean up the sport, Paula Radcliffe felt that her career and honesty were being attacked this week. She was obviously the unnamed British champion of London marathon in a poorly worded commentary in a Parlimentary hearing closed door event.

Here is how Greg Rutherford responded to it....

Rutherford-Powell-Beijing15.JPGGreg Rutherford, 2015 WC, and Mike Powell, 1991 WC and WR holder, photo by PhotoRun.net

Eaton_Ashton1500Intro-Beijing15.JPGAshton Eaton, World Championships, August 2015, photo by PhotoRun.net

Not everyone had such a remarkable world champs as Ashton Eaton. In fact, some did not have the best of champs. As Stuart Weir observed some of those who did not have great performances in Beijing working to make up for those tough days in Brussels today.

Here is one of his musings, called Four Weddings and a Funeral...

Simpson_JennyFV-RomeDL15.jpgJenny Simpson, Dawit Seyum, Sifan Hassan, Rome DL 1,500m, photo by PhotoRun.net

Middle distance running is a global sport.

214 countries are in the IAAF. Athletes can come from the smallest countries or the biggest countries. When Venuste Niyongabo won the 1,500m in 1995, his country, Burundi, was very, very new. In 1996, when Venuste won the Olympic gold medal over 5000 meters, people were surprised once again. Truth is, give an athlete a dream, a good pair of shoes and some desire, and away they go!

Week 13, Day Five, September 11, 2015, Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Week 13: You've Made It!

You've now got 3 months of solid training behind you. Keep the days between racing and the hard days relaxed. Now it's time to focus on your racing. How are you feeling? When do you tire? When do you kick? Try some different race strategies.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, 1-mile cool-down. To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month.

See options above.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: 1-mile warmup; 9 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start; repeat 8 times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds and then do your 1-mile easy cool-down.

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Easy 3-mile run or a 5K race.

Sunday: Easy 11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. (400 Mile: 8 miles/300 Mile: 7 miles)

Week 13 Total (Final Miles): 500 Mile-53 miles (540.5); 400 Mile-35 (418.5) miles; 300 Mile-29 miles (332.5)

Gaitlin_JustinR1c-RomeDL15.jpgJustin Gatlin, Rome DL, 2015, photo by PhotoRun.net

Justin Gatlin has a very busy night in Brussels tonight. He is running the 100 meters and 200 meters. Before he gets to those, Justin and Renaldo Nehemiah, his manager, spoke to Cathal Dennehy regarding lessons from Beijing and looking forward to Rio.

Schippers_DaphneQ1a-Beijing15.jpgDafne Schippers, photo by PhotoRun.net

Dafne Schippers won the European Championships at 100 meters and 200 meters in 2014. Then, Dafne ran 10.92 NR in London DL in July. In Beijing, she took the silver in the 100 meters and the gold in the 200 meters, setting NRs twice in the 100 meters, and a NR in the 200 meters.

Dafne's life has changed. In the Netherlands, Dafne Schippers is a superhero.

Her fortunes could become even bigger with success in Rio.

The former hepthathlete has only be concentrating this season the sprints.

Dafne had a knee problem in Gotzis, and pulled out of the competition.

Her season in the sprints has been nearly flawless.

Here is her story, by Alex Mills.

LarryeyeviewBeijing.jpgThe warm up track in Beijing, a view from about 200 feet above, photo by Larry Eder

Stuart Weir is one of my new finds from Beijing.

I have known the gentleman for some time.

And I took the time to ask if he would be interested in writing for us.

I am sure glad I did.

The following are some excerpts from Stuart's China blog.

They had me smiling, then laughing...

Within hours of Paula Radcliffe ruling out providing the results of her blood testing, SKY News announced that they had exclusive access to her blood tests, and in the above video, SKY News noted that Paula Radcliffe was NOT involved in doping.

The three blood samples in question had three scores in a range that should bring up questions. Once the IAAF asked Paula Radcliffe about all three tests that they questions, Radcliffe noted that she was trainng at altitude in two of the tests and the third was less than two hours after a half marathon. In current circumstances, Radcliffe's half marathon test would not have been done until two hours after the event.

Paula Radcliffe has been a huge supporter of anti doping efforts. Her frustation over the way this information has been handled, and sensationalized, rather than explaining the blood data within the context of how IAAF and WADA testers refer to the various samples. Radcliffe believes, and the SKY News report seems to bear this out, that the leaked data was not given the proper context, but was sensationalized.

Here is full story on Huffington Post: http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/2015/09/10/paula-radcliffe-blood-data-released-to-media-after-mp-sparks-doping-rumours_n_8116442.html

Kiprop_AsbelFV1-Zurich15.jpgAsbel Kiprop, photo by PhotoRun.net

The final event of the Diamond League is the Van Damme Memorial, on 11 September in Brussells. A fantastic meeting in a fantastic setting.

Cathal Dennehy writes here on the five events he thinks you should watch (although we believe that Mr. Yego may be iffy on this one).

We are in a crazy time in our sport.

In an effort to clean up the excesses and actual problem with cheating in our sport, the level of cynicism has become so resolute that anyone and everyone who has had a magnifiscent performance is suspect.

I believe that the feeding frenzy is such that common sense has gone out the window. The Parlimentary hearing is a case in point. Many in the room still do not get it. Proper analysis of drug tests is not something one learns in high school chemistry. There are too many variables. And, the media is playing with personal rights issues, which European law and US law rightly protect.

Can cheats be caught without resorting to blaming everyone? Yes. It requires money and an independent agency that does not play the media game. Too much of this recent issue smells of a power struggle in global sports.

Paula Radcliffe had the perfect storm. After bravely challenging most of the world's best over cross country, 5000 meters and 10,000 meters, and coming short, she moved to the marathon. The Jim Peters of women's marathon running, Paula Radcliffe's brilliant world records came at a huge price.

Her 2:15.25 was the perfect storm. Her fitness level was a 30:00 minute 10k. Her training was perfection, pace was perfect and her focus was thorough. Racliffe got more out of her body then, and has never, ever, come close to that level of shape again.

The injuries, the desire to finish Olympic events have all been written about. Like Bob Beamon, Paula Radcliffe had that moment of perfection that we all dream about, and few achieve.

Here is Mike Rowbottom's thoughtful piece on Paula Radcliffe.

DibabaLedsKiprop-Kirwa-Worlds15.jpgThe finish at World Champs marathon, August 30, 2015, photo by PhotoRun.net

Distance races come down, many times, to who has a kick at the end. Cross country races are many times like that: six or seven runners the finish. He or she who can save their finish the longest wins. Working on the 150 meter stride outs, the 300 meter repeats and charging up a hill during workouts prepares you for the tough going.

Week 13, Day 4, September 10, 2015, Thursday: 1-mile warmup; 9 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start; repeat 8 times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down.

Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds and then do your 1-mile easy cool-down.

If you would rather shake it up a bit, try this: one mile warm up, two miles on track, pushing the straights, jogging the turns, push the straights to mile speed right now, then, half mile jog, 12 times a 300 meters, 5k pace, with 100 meter jog, one mile cooldown

Week 13: You've Made It!

You've now got 3 months of solid training behind you. Keep the days between racing and the hard days relaxed. Now it's time to focus on your racing. How are you feeling? When do you tire? When do you kick? Try some different race strategies.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, 1-mile cool-down. To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month.

See options above.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: 1-mile warmup; 9 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start; repeat 8 times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds and then do your 1-mile easy cool-down.

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Easy 3-mile run or a 5K race.

Sunday: Easy 11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. (400 Mile: 8 miles/300 Mile: 7 miles)

Week 13 Total (Final Miles): 500 Mile-53 miles (540.5); 400 Mile-35 (418.5) miles; 300 Mile-29 miles (332.5)

One of the best parts of our sport is that the unpredictable happens.

When the pundits say someone is unbeatable, along comes someone who defeats the undefeated.

Such is the case of Almaz Ayana.

Here is a nice take on her 3000 meter victory in Zurich's Letzigrund stadium, penned by Alex Mills

Ayana_Almaz-Zurich15.jpgAlmaz Ayana, photo by PhotoRun.net

Infeld_Emily-Zurich15.jpgEmily Infeld, photo by PhotoRun.net

Just about two weeks ago, Emily Infeld was running 25 laps on the track in Beijing's Birds Nest. Running the race of her life, Emily ran the last lap out of her comfort zone. Sometimes, after lots of hard work and challenges, all those things that you practiced come to fruition.

For Emily, that was the case. She and her team mate, Shalane Flanagan, had practiced for a month how to finish a race, embrace the inner sprinter.

Emily did just that. Her last lap was tremendous, and her last steps, in that place where your body screams, and your heart pounds, Emily stayed clear minded and took the bronze medal in the 10,000 meters.

For Emily, it was a moment of a lifetime.

A defining moment.

Week 13, Day 3, September 9, 2015, Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Week 13: You've Made It!

You've now got 3 months of solid training behind you. Keep the days between racing and the hard days relaxed. Now it's time to focus on your racing. How are you feeling? When do you tire? When do you kick? Try some different race strategies.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, 1-mile cool-down. To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month.

See options on Tuesday.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: 1-mile warmup; 9 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start; repeat 8 times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds and then do your 1-mile easy cool-down.

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Easy 3-mile run or a 5K race.

Sunday: Easy 11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. (400 Mile: 8 miles/300 Mile: 7 miles)

Week 13 Total (Final Miles): 500 Mile-53 miles (540.5); 400 Mile-35 (418.5) miles; 300 Mile-29 miles (332.5)

Merritt_AriesQ-Beijing15.JPGAries Merritt, photo by PhotoRun.net

Aries Merritt took the bronze medal in the 110 meter hurdles in Beijing. That was on August 29. Two days later, he had kidney transplant surgery.

Aries is one of the ten moments from Beijing that David Hunter wrote about one week after the World Champs came to a close.

Read all ten of his Moments from Beijing.

Hejnova_Zuzana-Zurich15.jpgZuzana Hejnova, photo by PhotoRun.net

Zuzana Hejnova is the World Champion over 400 meter hurdles, one of the toughest events on the track. All of my 400 meter hurdlers and 300 meter hurdlers always ran cross country.

Here is day two of Week 13. We have provided some other options for day two, to fit with your schedule. We are presupposing that, like most high school programs, you are now racing twice a week.

Have fun! We will extend this schedule for two more weeks!

Week 13, Day 2, September 8, 2015, Tuesday: 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, 1-mile cool-down. To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month.

Two other options:

A. One mile warm up: One Hour Fartlek: Twenty minutes, one minute at 5k race pace, one minute easy, three minutes at 5k piece, two minutes easy, three minutes at 5k pace, two minutes easy, five minutes at 5k pace, 5 minutes easy, ten minutes, one minute at 5k pace, one minute easy. One mile cooldown.

B. One mile warm up, 5k race, one mile cooldown, 8 times 300 meters, easy jog two minutes, one mile cooldown.

Week 13: You've Made It!

You've now got 3 months of solid training behind you. Keep the days between racing and the hard days relaxed. Now it's time to focus on your racing. How are you feeling? When do you tire? When do you kick? Try some different race strategies.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, 1-mile cool-down. To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month.

See options above.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: 1-mile warmup; 9 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start; repeat 8 times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds and then do your 1-mile easy cool-down.

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Easy 3-mile run or a 5K race.

Sunday: Easy 11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. (400 Mile: 8 miles/300 Mile: 7 miles)

Week 13 Total (Final Miles): 500 Mile-53 miles (540.5); 400 Mile-35 (418.5) miles; 300 Mile-29 miles (332.5)

Coe_Seb-Zurich15.jpgSeb Coe, photo by PhotoRun.net

Seb Coe is the new IAAF President. He is the two time Olympic silver medalist at 800 meters, and two time Olympic gold medalist at 1,500 meters. No one else has ever done either of them. In 1984, I was fortunate to watch Seb take his second silver in the 800 meters, and then, watch him on TV win his second gold medal over 1,500 meters. Part of his success was the careful way he built up over the decade he trained to be a world class athlete.

Cross country was part of his build up over his years of training. Cross country is one of the key building blocks in your training. We can not guarantee that you will be a future WR holder, or a future IAAF president, but the cross country should help you be a better runner.

Week 13, Day One, September 7, 2015, Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Week 13: You've Made It!

You've now got 3 months of solid training behind you. Keep the days between racing and the hard days relaxed. Now it's time to focus on your racing. How are you feeling? When do you tire? When do you kick? Try some different race strategies.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, 1-mile cool-down. To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: 1-mile warmup; 9 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start; repeat 8 times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds and then do your 1-mile easy cool-down.

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Easy 3-mile run or a 5K race.

Sunday: Easy 11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. (400 Mile: 8 miles/300 Mile: 7 miles)

Week 13 Total (Final Miles): 500 Mile-53 miles (540.5); 400 Mile-35 (418.5) miles; 300 Mile-29 miles (332.5)

Ronoh_Geoffrey-PragueH15.JPG

Geoffrey Ronoh, photo by PhotoRun.net

Geoffrey Ronoh won the Prague 10k in 2014, running 27:28 to defeat Geoffrey Mutai.

This interview, done before the Birelli Prague 10k is fascinating. Andy Edwards, of Race Results Service, learnt that Geoffrey is a ranger who deals with illegal poaching.

A fascinating story!

Huddle_MollyFV-USAout15.JPgMolly Huddle wins 10,000m, photo by PhotoRun.net

NEW HAVEN (USA): USATF informs that a half dozen Olympians, led by defending women's champion Molly Huddle, headline the fieldsMonday morning at the USATF 20 km Championships, hosted by the Faxon Law New Haven Road Race in New Haven, Connecticut. For Dathan Ritzenhein, Monday's race is another opportunity to gage his fitness as he works his way back to top racing form. The three-time Olympian seeks a major race victory and coming off his third place finish last month at the Crim 10 Miler, Ritzenhein should be in contention for the win in the final stages of the race. Similarly for Tegenkamp and Abdirahman, the focus for both athletes is to test their fitness having raced little in 2015, all the while contending for the win. Both athletes have winning experience on the course, Tegenkamp having won in both 2012 and 2013, while Abdirahman winning in 2011. Not to be overlooked, Sam Chelanga competes for his first U.S. title this weekend after gaining American citizenship earlier this year.

Flanagan_Shalane-World15.JPgShalane Flanagan, photo by PhotoRun.net

Shalane Flanagan broke the AR for 10k on the roads today, September 6, 2015 in Holland! Nice one, Shalane!

Flanagan sets American 10K road record in Holland

9/6/2015

HOLLAND, Netherlands -- Shalane Flanagan (Marblehead, Massachusetts) set an American record Sunday at the Tilburg Ten Miles in Holland, Netherlands.


Flanagan ran 31:03 for the road 10K Sunday, trimming three seconds off the previous record, set in 1990 by Lynn Jennings in Orlando, Florida.


Flanagan's previous best over the distance was 31:27 at the 2014 Beach to Beacon 10k, and the two-time Olympian now owns six American records (indoor 3000m, indoor 5000m, 10,000m, road 15k, women's-only marathon).

Schippers_DaphneQ1a-Beijing15.jpgDafne Schippers, photo by PhotoRun.net

Schippers 11.12 in the 100 m
AMSTERDAM (NED, Sep 5): At the Flame Games, Dafne Schippers made her competitive homecoming after her medal winning exploits in Beijing with a win in the 100m. She clocked 11.12 (0.5), well ahead of Sherone Simpson of Jamaica (11.28) and Charonda Williams (11.30). Schippers also ran 11.21 (0.7) in the heats. In the heats of the men's 100m, Qatar's Femi Ogunode ran 9.97, but it was aided by a 3.0. Jamaican Julian Forte had a legal 1.8 behind him in clocking 10.11 to win the other heat ahead of Nesta Carter (10.13). In the final Femi Ogunode finished on top again, this time with 10.05 and a legal 0.8. Nesta Carter of Jamaica (10.12) and Ramon Gittens of Barbados (10.15) were next. 2014 world junior medallist Gudaf Tsegay ran 4:09.24 to win the women's 1500m, in which the last athlete at 500m, 700m, 900m and 1100m must drop out. Poland's world finalist Angelika Cichocka ran 4:10.69 for second. Novlene Williams Mills of Jamaica clocked 52.12 to win the women's 400m over Russia's Yekaterina Renzhina 52.90. American 400m hurdles specialist Georganne Moline ran 53.16 for 4th, her compatriot Tiffany Williams was disqualified. World junior champion Alfred Kipketer won the 600m in 1:15.60 over Ireland's Mark English, who improved his national record to 1:15.71, and fellow Kenyans Nicholas Kipkoech (1:15.87) and Robert Biwott (1:15.91). Kristi Castlin of the USA (13.04, 1.9) finished ahead of Great Britain's Lucy Hatton (13.09) and Dutch heptathlon talent Nadine Visser (13.21), in the 100mH. Shane Braithwaite clocked 13.57 (-0.6) to win the men's high hurdles race; former world champion Jason Richardson ran 13.73 for third. Lisa Ryzih of Germany won the pole vault on countback over the USA's Mary Saxer, both cleared 4.20.

Thweatt_LauraFL-VaBeach15.jpgLaura Thweatt, photo by PhotoRun.net

The Humana RNR Virginia Beach Half Marathon is one of those events that showcases the growth of the sport, and the vitality of our sport.

The opportunities for elite American runners to get a chance to race and make a few bucks is a good thing too.

Fraser_ShellyAnneFH-Beijing15.JPGShelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce wins the WC 100m!, August 24, 2015, photo by PhotoRun.net

Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce won the 100 meters with the style of this Jamaican super star. One of my favorite interviews over the years, SAFP works her butt off. I like her sense of humor and her work ethic. This season, she had some of the toughest competition ever, and she rose to the top.

Part of it, for the Jamaican pocket-rocket is her racing savy and also her focus.

Here is Alex Mills' piece on her DL and World Champs wins, with the DL at Zurich. Alex was one of the three writers we had for @runblogrun at Zurich (Cathal Dennehy, Stuar Weir and Alex Mills).

Enjoy!

Nyambura_VirginiaR-Doha15.JPgVirginia Nyambura, photo by PhotoRun.net

World best in women 2k steeple
BERLIN (GER, Sep 6): The 74th ISTAF Berlin had five fresh world champions, two recorded wins. However it wasn't the newly crowned champions of the world who provided the highlights; fast 800m races, a world best in the women's 2000mSC and a good men's shot were among the top competitions. In the women's 800m, Lynsey Sharp ran 1:57.71, putting her third on Great Britain's all-time list. In second, Fabienne Kohlmann also set a lifetime best, her time of 1:58.34 is the joint second fastest time ever by a German. World champion Marina Arzamasova followed with 1:58.88 while Chanelle Price of the USA also went under 2, running 1:59.99. She was followed by her compatriot Shannon Rowbury (2:00.03 PB), Christina Hering (2:00.04), Joanna Jozwik (2:00.27), Caster Semenya (2:00.51) and Rababe Arafi (2:01.79). In the men's race, Nijel Amos, who didn't make the world final, adopted an uncharacteristic front running style, which proved successful as he won in 1:43.28, nearly a second ahead of world silver medallist Adam Kszczot (1:44.42). 2013 world champion Mohammed Aman (1:44.24), Olympic 1500m champion Taoufik Makhloufi (1:44.24) and Musaeb Balla (1:44.62) took the other top spots. Over the rarely-run 2000mSC, Virginia Nyambura of Kenya set a world all-time best of 6:02.16; in setting the world record in 2008, Gulnara Galkina of Russia went through 2000m in 6:01.20. Kenya went 1-2 with Beatrice Chepkoech clocking 6:02.47 to finish ahead of German world medallist Gesa Krause, who set a national record of 6:04.20. New Zealand's Tom Walsh upstaged home favourite David Storl in the shot, recording 21.47 in the third round. Storl could only respond with 21.19. There was good depth as O'Dayne Richards also went over 21, recording 21.05. In the women's competition, world champion Christina Schwanitz putt 19.66 to secure a German win. The other world champion to record a win was Piotr Malachowski who won the men's discus with 66.13; he had three efforts better than Christoph Harting's 65.15. After vaulting 593 on Friday, Olympic champion Renaud Lavillenie failed to make a height, fouling twice at 554 and then once at 564. World bronze medallist Piotr Lisek took the win with a first attempt clearance of 574, beating Kostas Filippidis, who made that height on his third attempt. Both failed at 581. They were followed by the last three world champions. 2015 World champion Shawn Barber (564), Pawel Wojciechowski (554) and 2013 world champion Raphael Holzdeppe (544). Dawn Harper Nelson got back to winning ways after her fall in Beijing, clocking 12.82 for a narrow win over Sharika Nelvis (12.84). Tiffany Porter ran 12.92 for third ahead of the top finisher in the field from the world championships, Cindy Roleder, who ran 12.95. In the men's 100m, Kim Collins won in 10.13 (1.1) over Isiah Young (10.17) and the French pair of Christophe Lemaitre (10.19) and Jimmy Vicaut (10.21). Candyce McGrone of the USA followed on from her good race in Zurich with 11.11 (0.6) to win the women's 100m. Germany's Verena Sailer ran 11.37 for 5th in her final race before retirement. After winning the 3000mSC at Weltklasse, Paul Koech who was not in Beijing got another win under his belt, running 13:08.86 in the 5000m to beat Americans Hassan Mead (13:10.38) and Bernard Lagat (13:17.58). Marharyta Dorozhon of Israel threw 63.24 to beat Germany's world champion Katharina Molitor (61.19) in the javelin. Germany's Kathrin Klaas was a dominant winner in the women's hammer, throwing 72.09 to American Amber Campbell's best of 70.94. World bronze medallist Ivana Spanovic won the women's long jump with 6.60 (-0.6), while Christabel Nettey got out to 645 (-1.1) for second. Andrew Riley of Jamaica was the men's 110mH winner in a time of 13.40 (-0.1).

Here is the Division 1 Men's Individual Preview on the Men's individual championships from our partners at the USTFCCCA.org!

Here is the PreSeason D1 Women's Individual Preview, from USTFCCCA.org.

This piece originally appeared on AthleteBiz.com. Kyle Merber explains the Long Island Mile on September 9!

Morris_150604_0742.jpgKyle Merber, Adrian Martinez Classic, photo by Kevin Morris.

DibabaLedsKiprop-Kirwa-Worlds15.jpg

Dibaba battles for the gold medal, photo by PhotoRun.net

The World Championships answered many questions for us.

One of my favorite championships of the fifteen that I have attended (outdoor and indoor), the championships were a combination of good, bad, ugly and great.

Cathal Dennehy wrote this piece the middle of last week, and I am getting to it today.

Sorry for the delay.

Now, with a week behind us, it is a good time to remember the amazing things that happen when we bring the best athletes from 214 countries around the globe.

Centrowitz_Matt-World15.JPgThe World Champs 1,500 meter final, bell lap, photo by PhotoRun.net

Week 12, Day 7, September 6, 2015, Sunday: Easy 11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. (400 Mile: 8 miles/300 Mile: 7 miles).

Week 12: Here Comes Cross Country Season

High school cross country starts quickly, so use those early races to get into shape. Continue to build speed. 300 Mile athletes add a Saturday run.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, Fartlek session, 1-mile cool down. To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:30 for a 5K now, that means a 6:00 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:30 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month.

Fartlek, 30 minutes, two minutes @5k pace, one minute relaxed, times ten

One Mile Cooldown

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Thursday: 1-mile warmup; 8 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start. Repeat 7 more times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging back to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds.

Repetions, Five minutes hard, @5k pace, Five minutes relaxed, time three.

1-mile easy cool-down.

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Sunday: Easy 11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. (400 Mile: 8 miles/300 Mile: 7 miles).

Week 12 Total: 500 Mile-53 miles; 400 Mile-37 miles; 300 Mile-29 miles

Mo. 2 Total (To Date): 500 Mile-199 (487.5) miles; 400 Mile-133.5 (383.5) miles; 300 Mile-103.5 (193.5) miles

Here, finally, is my last column on the final night's action on the World Championships in Beijing. After the build up and controversy, the meet came off much better than I expected.

Teferi-DibabaFH-World15.JPgTefari nabs the silver from Dibaba, photo by PhotoRun.net

In the end, I believe that we continue to miss the major positives of our sport. We make a huge mistake pushing records and fast races. We need to let them come when they do.

Sports fans want competitions between teams, and stories of athletes that they can identify with and cheer for. For track and field to be a success, and to grow, we need to respond to the threat and stench caused by drug cheats, but that is not all.

We need to remember that athletics is a universal experience that needs to be told and retold.

Rudisha-RotichOneToGo-Beijing15.JPGMen's 800 meters, World Champs, photos by PhotoRun.net

Most high school cross country programs have started or will start this coming Tuesday. Over 500,000 high school boys and girls will compete in the Fall 2015 programs at 16,000 plus high schools supporting one of the world's most supported sports, cross country.

Week 12, Day 6, September 4, 2015, Saturday: Easy 3-mile run. (400 Mile: 2 miles/300 Mile: 2 miles), or a 5k-6k race, on a hilly course. Start out mid pack and pick off one athlete at a time. Finish hard.


Week 12:
Here Comes Cross Country Season

High school cross country starts quickly, so use those early races to get into shape. Continue to build speed. 300 Mile athletes add a Saturday run.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, Fartlek session, 1-mile cool down. To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:30 for a 5K now, that means a 6:00 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:30 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month.

Fartlek, 30 minutes, two minutes @5k pace, one minute relaxed, times ten

One Mile Cooldown

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Thursday: 1-mile warmup; 8 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start. Repeat 7 more times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging back to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds.

Repetions, Five minutes hard, @5k pace, Five minutes relaxed, time three.

1-mile easy cool-down.

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Sunday: Easy 11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. (400 Mile: 8 miles/300 Mile: 7 miles).

Week 12 Total: 500 Mile-53 miles; 400 Mile-37 miles; 300 Mile-29 miles

Mo. 2 Total (To Date): 500 Mile-199 (487.5) miles; 400 Mile-133.5 (383.5) miles; 300 Mile-103.5 (193.5) miles

2015-09-04-great_citygames.pngDina Asher-Smith and Dafne Schippers, photo from Great Run Company

The Great City Games is one of my favorite events. I am heading over to NewCastle to seeing one of the most innovative events in our sport. As new IAAF president Seb Coe noted on August 11, there should be a global series of these.

RunBlogRun is committed to helping make that happen.

The City Games is about bringing the sport to the people and some of our finest athletes to new fans.

We will be covering the event from September 9-September 14.

Thanks to the Great Run Company for their support of our visit to their fine event.

Fraser_ShellyAnnFH1a-Beijing15.JPGShelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce, with Dafne Schippers, VCB, in Beijing, August 2015, photo by PhotoRun.net

The Weltklasse Zurich, held in the Letzigrand stadium, is one of the greatest events in the athletic world. SAFP won the 100 meters in rare style. LaShawn Merritt won the 400 meters, and some fine racing entertained the crowd in the 800 meters, 1,500 meters, 3,000 meters and steeplechase.

Here are the complete results:

Huddle_MollyLedsH-Beijing15.JPGThe World Champs 10,000 meters, photo by PhotoRun.net

Week 12, Day Five, September 4, 2015, Friday:


Week 12:
Here Comes Cross Country Season

High school cross country starts quickly, so use those early races to get into shape. Continue to build speed. 300 Mile athletes add a Saturday run.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, Fartlek session, 1-mile cool down. To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:30 for a 5K now, that means a 6:00 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:30 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month.

Fartlek, 30 minutes, two minutes @5k pace, one minute relaxed, times ten

One Mile Cooldown

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Thursday: 1-mile warmup; 8 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start. Repeat 7 more times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging back to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds.

Repetions, Five minutes hard, @5k pace, Five minutes relaxed, time three.

1-mile easy cool-down.

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Saturday: Easy 3-mile run. (400 Mile: 2 miles/300 Mile: 2 miles)

Sunday: Easy 11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. (400 Mile: 8 miles/300 Mile: 7 miles).

Week 12 Total: 500 Mile-53 miles; 400 Mile-37 miles; 300 Mile-29 miles

Mo. 2 Total (To Date): 500 Mile-199 (487.5) miles; 400 Mile-133.5 (383.5) miles; 300 Mile-103.5 (193.5) miles

The Weltklasse is a meet that every track fan should attend once in their life.

It is not just the events, but the spirit and culture of Zurich. Three or four days after the World Champs ended half a world away was a challenge this year.

But, the meet management rose to the ocassion.

Here is Alex Mills' piece on the pole vault, and it attracted Swiss commuters to our sport.

Barber_Shawn1-Beijing15.JPGShawn Barber, photo by PhotoRun.net

Week 12, Day 4, September 3, 2015, Thursday: 1-mile warmup; 8 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start. Repeat 7 more times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging back to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds.

Repetions, Five minutes hard, @5k pace, Five minutes relaxed, time three.

1-mile easy cool-down.

Week 12: Here Comes Cross Country Season

High school cross country starts quickly, so use those early races to get into shape. Continue to build speed. 300 Mile athletes add a Saturday run.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, Fartlek session, 1-mile cool down. To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:30 for a 5K now, that means a 6:00 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:30 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month.

Fartlek, 30 minutes, two minutes @5k pace, one minute relaxed, times ten

One Mile Cooldown

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Thursday: 1-mile warmup; 8 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start. Repeat 7 more times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging back to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds.

Repetions, Five minutes hard, @5k pace, Five minutes relaxed, time three.

1-mile easy cool-down.

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Saturday: Easy 3-mile run. (400 Mile: 2 miles/300 Mile: 2 miles)

Sunday: Easy 11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. (400 Mile: 8 miles/300 Mile: 7 miles).

Week 12 Total: 500 Mile-53 miles; 400 Mile-37 miles; 300 Mile-29 miles

Mo. 2 Total (To Date): 500 Mile-199 (487.5) miles; 400 Mile-133.5 (383.5) miles; 300 Mile-103.5 (193.5) miles

VanNiekerk_Wayde-Beijing15.JPGThe World Champs 400m, Merritt, James, Van Niekerk, photo by PhotoRun.net

The Men's 400 meters was one of the highlights of the World Championships. LaShawn Merritt went out like a bat out of hell, in effect, doing the pace setting for Wayde Van Niekerk. In the perfect storm, Van Niekert put together a near perfect race, LaShawn Merritt ran the best he has in half a decade and Kirani James learned that he truly has competition.

For us, the media and fans, the men's 400 meters for Rio could be something extraordinary!

Here is Alex Mills' piece from the 400 meter presser in Zurich on September 2, 2015.

Stuart Weir is visiting the Weltklasse at the Zurich Letzigrund, which happens on Thursday, September 3, 2015. Here is a short preview of one of the final Diamond League meetings of 2015.

zurichDL.jpg

Look very closely at the photo. Cooly, the mascot is pole vaulting. Photo by Stuart Weir.

Sabrina Yohannes wrote this piece on the Almaz Ayana and Genzebe Dibaba and their upcoming battle on September 3 in Zurich Diamond League.

The battle for the World Champs 5,000 meters was one of the highlights of the recently ended World Champs!

Simpson_JennySF1a-jpgJenny Simpson, photo by PhotoRun.net

Week 12, Day 3, September 2, 2015, Tuesday: 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, Fartlek session, 1-mile cool down. To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:30 for a 5K now, that means a 6:00 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:30 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month.

Fartlek, 30 minutes, two minutes @5k pace, one minute relaxed, times ten

One Mile Cooldown

Week 12: Here Comes Cross Country Season

High school cross country starts quickly, so use those early races to get into shape. Continue to build speed. 300 Mile athletes add a Saturday run.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, Fartlek session, 1-mile cool down. To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:30 for a 5K now, that means a 6:00 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:30 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month.

Fartlek, 30 minutes, two minutes @5k pace, one minute relaxed, times ten

One Mile Cooldown

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Thursday: 1-mile warmup; 8 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start. Repeat 7 more times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging back to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds.

Repetions, Five minutes hard, @5k pace, Five minutes relaxed, time three.

1-mile easy cool-down.

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Saturday: Easy 3-mile run. (400 Mile: 2 miles/300 Mile: 2 miles)

Sunday: Easy 11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. (400 Mile: 8 miles/300 Mile: 7 miles).

Week 12 Total: 500 Mile-53 miles; 400 Mile-37 miles; 300 Mile-29 miles

Mo. 2 Total (To Date): 500 Mile-199 (487.5) miles; 400 Mile-133.5 (383.5) miles; 300 Mile-103.5 (193.5) miles

Gary Morgan is the associate editor of Michigan Runner.

He is one of my great friends, and he is fearless. The man has traveled in more countries than I, and every day starts with a couple hour walk in areas that he travels. Gary has written a column of his travels for years, found at MichiganRunner.com, one of our partner sites.

In 2008, we did the Gary & Larry Show at the Olympic Trials and in Beijing. I have to admit that those are some of my favorite memories.

Art & Jennie McCafferty, the publisher and editor of MIchigan Runner have championed digital video for the Running Network, Michigan Runner and Michigan Golf for nearly two decades. Art & Jennie understood the value of the web, and social media long before me.

Gary Morgan has a cult following, he is known as Mr. Ubiquitous.

His gentle camera focus, and his thoughtful questions come from a man who made the 1988 Olympic team the hard way-he earned it. Walking the 20k and 50k, Gary made the 1988 Olympic team at the 20k Race walk. A 2:35 marathoner, Gary Morgan learned to racewalk and pursued his dream.

Here is a collection of Gary's work, posted by my spiritual advisor, Art McCafferty as Gary Morgan sleeps on his crazy flights back from China.

I believe Gary Morgan is pace setting for a half marathon next weekend somewhere in America. He is a pace setter for about 30 races a year.

Beijing Flashback, from EME News

| 0 Comments

JamaicaWomen4x4Intro-Beijing15.JPGJamaica's 4x400m, gold medal winning team, photo by PhotoRun.net

The world championships had moments of ecstasy and moments of agony. Plus, everything in between. The mens' 1,500 meters was won in the last fifteen meters, and the women's 4x400 meter relay was won in the very last steps.

EME News' Alfons Juck provided, as he does every day, insights into the sport of global athletics.

Barber_Shawn-Beijing15.JPGShawn Barber, photo by PhotoRun.net

University of Akron junior, Shawn Barber, has signed a professional athlete contract with Nike, giving up his final year of NCAA elgibility.

In a crazy summer which saw him win the NCAA Champs, Pan-Am Games, and in a remarkablly poised upset of Renaud Lavillenie, WR holder and 2013 World Champ Raphael Holzdeppe, Shawn Barber cleared 5.55m, 5.65m, 5.80m, 5.90m, all on his first attempts. He only missed at 6.00 meters, and with the misses by Renaud Lavillenie (and a miss at an earlier height), Barber went into the lead, and won over Raphael Holzdeppe's silver.

Coached by his father, Barber, as his father had trained him all these years, Shawn Barber played the game longer than anyone else, winning the gold medal!

ZURICH (SUI): World pole vault champion Shawn Barber will compete at the Weltklasse meet on September 2 as a professional athlete. The 21 year old Canadian has signed a contract with Nike. The Weltklasse Zürich at Zurich Main Station will be both an exciting show and a high-carat sports event. The world's best pole vaulters will compete at the rather unusual venue on Wednesday, 2 September, starting at6pm. Four medallists of the recent world championships in Beijing will be among the participants.

The Saucony Run for Good Challenge is a wonderful example of giving back to our communities. Saucony is a great example of a company that gets it. To be a good corporate citizen, one must have more considerations than just being profitable.

We encourage runners to get involved!

bentrue2.jpgBen True, Saucony athlete, photo by Kevin Morris, Photo Shelter

Arzamasova_MarinaFH-World15.JPgWorld Champs 800m, photo by PhotoRun.net

Look at the picture above. A year's worth of hard training, built up over 12-14 years of prior training, comes down to a lean, and final kick, a desperate last run. You build up the endurance to hold on at the end of a race over months and years. Your ability to handle the repetition work, speed work, all comes from the miles you did in the cross country season.

September 1, 2015, Week 12, Day 2, Tuesday: 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, Fartlek session, 1-mile cool down. To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:30 for a 5K now, that means a 6:00 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:30 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month.

Fartlek, 30 minutes, two minutes @5k pace, one minute relaxed, times ten

One Mile Cooldown

Week 12: Here Comes Cross Country Season

High school cross country starts quickly, so use those early races to get into shape. Continue to build speed. 300 Mile athletes add a Saturday run.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, Fartlek session, 1-mile cool down. To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:30 for a 5K now, that means a 6:00 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:30 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month.

Fartlek, 30 minutes, two minutes @5k pace, one minute relaxed, times ten

One Mile Cooldown

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Thursday: 1-mile warmup; 8 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start. Repeat 7 more times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging back to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds.

Repetions, Five minutes hard, @5k pace, Five minutes relaxed, time three.

1-mile easy cool-down.

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Saturday: Easy 3-mile run. (400 Mile: 2 miles/300 Mile: 2 miles)

Sunday: Easy 11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. (400 Mile: 8 miles/300 Mile: 7 miles).

Week 12 Total: 500 Mile-53 miles; 400 Mile-37 miles; 300 Mile-29 miles

Mo. 2 Total (To Date): 500 Mile-199 (487.5) miles; 400 Mile-133.5 (383.5) miles; 300 Mile-103.5 (193.5) miles

This is the final day of info on the World Champs by Alfons Juck of EME News. Those who are familiar with RunBlogRun know that we have worked with Alfons for nearly five years now. His nightly news updates are keys to understanding the global nature of our sport.

It is one of my favorite parts of global champs. Seeing my comrades in media from around the world. Speaking with Alfons Juck, Gene Cherry, Nicholas Herbert and Alan Abrahamson every day of a champs is really a benefit.

DibabaLedsKiprop-Kirwa-Worlds15.jpgThe battle for the marathon medals, August 30, 2015, photo by PhotoRun.net

Wake up to RunBlogRun's news in your inbox. Sign up for our newsletter and we'll keep you informed about the Sport you love.

Subscribe to RunBlogRun's Global News Feed

* indicates required