October 2015 Archives

Kipyego_Hadley_Thweatt_NYCM_2015.jpg

PHOTO: Sally Kipyego, Alana Hadley and Laura Thweatt in advance of the 2015 TCS New York City Marathon (photo by Chris Lotsbom for Race Results Weekly)
The creation of a marathon field is fascinating. New York put together a fine field of experienced marathoners, but it is always exciting to see how some marathoners do in their debuts. Chris Lotsbom caught up with these three fine distance runners, all at different places in their careers.

Ritchie_TimFV-Philly15.JPgTimothy Ritchie wins the RNR Philly Half Marathon

Krifchin_MaeganFL-Philly15.JPgMaegan Krifchin, winner of RNR Philly, photo by PhotoRun.net

The RNR Philly Half was moved to end of October this year and 44 men and women made the Oly Trials standard! Timothy Ritchie ran the race of his life, Maegan Krifchin ran a fine race! Great to seeing the performances of our elite runners today!

e7e65a_b9158c8aedaa4e95a7428b677a957713.jpg_srz_p_269_301_75_22_0.50_1.20_0.00_jpg_srz.jpgSheikha Asma Al Thani, Courtesy of TalentsUnlimitedQatar.com

Qatari strategy for sport

Qatar may be a small country on the Persian Gulf with only 2 million inhabitants but it is securely on the sports map. A one sentence description of the country is: "Qatar is a peninsular Arab country whose terrain comprises arid desert and a long Persian Gulf shoreline of beaches and dunes".

The country has hosted a Diamond League event for a few years, it is hosting the IPC (Disability) Athletics World Championships at the moment and will host the 2019 IAAF Athletics World Championships. Then there are the World Handball and World Cycling Championships in the next two years before the FIFA Football World Cup in 2022.

How has a small country like Qatar attracted so many top events to the country? Stuart Weir spoke to Sheikha Asma Al Thani, a member of the Qatari Royal Family, Director of Marketing for the Qatar Olympic Committee.

Kipsang_Wilson1f-Berlin13.jpgWilson Kipsang, photo by PhotoRun.net

The weekend around the marathon is a fascinating social experience. Managers, athletes, coaches, sponsors, fans, are all together. The bar at the NYC Hilton is a meeting place where many deals are made and many hope to meet athletes, coaches, and other players in the sport. It is also fascinating to see how the hotel rates go from $199 a room to $500 plus a night. Oh, New York. One has to pay for the opportunity to be in the very nicest of places, but especially during the week of the marathon.

For many of us, there is no place that we would rather be this week. The New York City marathon is a meeting place for the industry, for media, for 50,000 marathoners and their families. Add the World Series, and the celebration of Halloween (our digital team, the Shoe Addicts are dressed up as characters from the Power Rangers, but you can see those on our twitter account @runblogrun).

Below are some of the stories behind the stories in New York, from Alfons Juck of EME News. Alfons is read by many of the key players in the sport on a daily basis.

Enjoy! And remember to watch our social coverage at RunBlogRun.com at the Live tab.

Cabral_DonFHH-NYrr5k15.jpgDon Cabral wins NYRR 5k, photo by PhotoRun.net

Higginson_Ashley-NyrrDash15.JPGAshley Higginson, photo by PhotoRun.net

Pappas_Alexi1a-NyrrDash15.JPGAlexi Pappas won the NYRR 5k ! photo by PhotoRun.net

Don Cabral and Alexi Pappas made it a Nike day for the winners of the 5k of the NYRR 5K Dash! Here is the piece from Chris Lotsbom of RRW. We, of course, use it with permission.

Kamworor_Geoffrey-Pre15.jpgGeoffrey Kamworor, photo by PhotoRun.net
NEW YORK CITY (USA): World cross country and half marathon champion Geoffrey Kamworor hopes that Sunday's New York City Marathon will be his big breakthrough at the distance, report RRW. In his first five marathons, he struggled after the 35km mark. In order to have more endurance for this race, he has run 30 to 40 km long runs twice a week in his preparation. His coach Patrick Sang said that Kamworor has a better mentality than the other athletes he trains; London and Berlin champion Eliud Kipchoge being one of the training group's members. Sang says that the half marathon is still Kamworor's best distance, but he believes that in the long run he can achieve his best results at the marathon.

Editors note: I first saw Kamworor run in Copenhagen in March 2014. He is a tough competitor. His wins in World Champs half, World Cross country and his silver medal in Beijing in the 10,000 meters were amazingly impressive. Can Geoffrey do well over the marathon distance? I think he will battle Mr. Kipsang, but Wilson may have other ideas.

We shall see tomorrow!

I have watched Sally Kipyego race many times in her storied career. I have most enjoyed her racing Shalane Flanagan and Molly Huddle at the Payton Jordan Invite. Her battles with both fine Americans over 10,000 meters have been dramatic battles over twenty-five laps.

Now, Sally Kipyego is running her debut on Sunday over 26.2 miles. With her fine training, and the thoughtful coaching of Mark Rowland, Sally has been in good hands.

We look forward to seeing Sally race over the five boroughs in New York. Sally Kipyego reminds me of a patient runner or two that I have seen over the years.

If she is patient tomorrow, she could go far.

Kipyego_Sally1-Pre15.jpgSally Kipyego, PRE 2015, photo by PhotoRun.net

Arcianiaga_Nick-Boston15.jpgNick Arciniaga, photo by PhotoRun.net

Nick Arciniaga is one of those athletes who looks like he could bust open a big one.

He has paid his dues, with good races and bad races. The writer John Parker called that the "Trials of Miles and Miles of Trials."

Nick wants to perform well in New York tomorrow. His goal, his dream is a top five performance. His support from Under Armour has allowed Nick to focus on Los Angeles. Arciniaga is an athlete who should be in the thick of the battle for a top ten performance, or , with some luck, even better.

But the real goal is fifteen weeks from now, in Los Angeles, California, when he will line up with 150 or so of his closest competitors, fighting for a top three performance in the U.S. Olympic Marathon Team Trials.

Here is a wonderful piece on Nick at the cross roads, by Cathal Dennehy.

Thweatt_LauraFL1-VaBeach15.jpgLaura Thweatt, photo by PhotoRun.net

Laura Thweatt is an old school runner, in my mind. With a strong cross country background, Laura possesses the endurance and the patience to excel at the 26.2 mile distance. In the following piece by Carolyn Mather, one of our keenest observers of the sport notes that Laura has the tools to do well over 26.2 miles and 10,000 meters.

We concur.

The journey of 42.195 kilometers, however, starts with some patience over that first 35 kilometers. Let's see how Laura handles the big cross country course that is the TCS New York City Marathon course through the five boroughs.

22553849576_2de72cb1e9_o.jpgIsis Holt, Australia, photo by IPC

Stuart Weir has spent nearly two weeks in Doha, writing about the IPC Athletics World Champs with the attention to detail and desire to provide the story and context needed to appreciate and celebrate the IPC Championships. Here is his piece on the 100 meters.

Fisher_Grant1a-FLmwXC14.jpgGrant Fisher, photo by PhotoRun.net

Race days are becoming very, very important as the season comes to a focus. Hydrate, focus, rest. Your big races are upon you!

Week 20, Day Six, October 31, 2015, Saturday: Race Day 2

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, try one of the following:

1. Run the race course again, run three minutes hard, three minutes easy, three times, cooldown.

2. Run an easy four miles, then, go three hundred meters from finish, and practice, six times.

3. Run 5k course, first mile take easy, increase pace in second mile, run final mile at race pace, finish hard, cooldown.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: Hard Day

Here are three options for this day of the week:

1. Race Day

a. Warm up, with one to two miles, and some stride outs, 5k race, then, one of the following:

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Go to your conference meet course, warm up, run the course like this: run the first mile at race pace, jog half mile, run hard half mile, jog half mile, run last half mile of course hard, cooldown.

3. Warm up, 3 x mile @ 5k race pace, half mile jog, 4x200 meters on track, 90 percent effort, cooldown.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Race Day 1

1. Race Day, warm up well, some strideouts, 5k race, cool down a bit, then, one of the following:

a. Hill work, 1-mile warmup; 9 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start; repeat 8 times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds and then do your 1-mile easy cool-down.

2. Warm up, go to track, 12 times 400 meters at 5k race pace, 200 meter jog, finish with 4x 300 meters, at finish speed pace, cooldown.

3. Warm up, 3 miles on track, 200 meters, race pace, 200 meters moderate pace, repeat 12 times, cooldown.

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day 2

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, try one of the following:

1. Run the race course again, run three minutes hard, three minutes easy, three times, cooldown.

2. Run an easy four miles, then, go three hundred meters from finish, and practice, six times.

3. Run 5k course, first mile take easy, increase pace in second mile, run final mile at race pace, finish hard, cooldown.

Sunday: Easy 7-11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are recovering from the racing.

22363003039_3c99038ef2_o-2.jpgDoha, and the Doha Sports Club athletics facility, photo from IPC

Here is Stuart Weir's column on Doha. I think you will find it enjoyable! After nine days in Qatar, Stu has kept his sense of humor or humour, however one spells it.

The Saucony ISO 2 with EVERUN technology is being launched this weekend at the New York City Marathon from October 29 to November 1. It will be available at select specialty running retailers on November 1. In order to understand the new EVERUN Continuous cushioning technology, Saucony sent us the following video to view and share with our readers. EVERUN technology is the newest innovation from the Saucony brand, and we encourage you to give it a test run!

The Saucony ISO Triumph won best of category award in the Fall from the Running Network and many other running media reviews. We expect the Saucony ISO 2 with EVERUN to do more of the same. Saucony's running product has continued to evolve, for the better, answering the needs of the running community.

Besides the NYC marathon Expo, where the Saucony ISO Triumph 2 with EVERUN is now on sale, selected specialty running stores will feature it starting November 1. You can also find it at www.saucony.com on November 1, retailing for $150.00. You can find a retailer near you at 1-800-365-4933 or www.saucony.com.

Check out the video, supplied by Saucony, right below this note, to get a feel for how the EVERUN continuous techonology works! See you on a run!

Kipsang_Wilson1f-Berlin13.jpgWilson Kipsang, photo by PhotoRun.net

The saying goes, one is only as good as their last race. Wilson Kipsang had a tough 2015, first, his defeat in London by Eliud KIpchoge, and then, his DNF at the World Champs. Kipsang is determined to come back and defend his title in New York, as he told Cathal Dennehy during an interview done on October 29, 2015.

Here is that story...

Gebrselassie_Haile1d-Vienna13.jpgHaile Gebrselassie, photo by PhotoRun.net

Just before Haile recieved his Hall of Fame plaque, I teased him. I reminded him that in Hengelo, when he ran his last 10,000 meters on the track ( May 2012), he told us that he was trading his tracksuit for a businesssuit.

He smiled.

And less than fifteen minutes later, Haile Gebrselassie won the Abebe Bikila Award. Haile was honored, noting that Abebe Bikila won before any other Africans had. Bikila, noted Haile, was the first of Ethiopians and Kenyans.

Here is a nice piece by Cathal Dennehy, the media winner of the IAAF World Champs 800 meter media race in 1:59, and a prolific contributor to RunBlogRun.

BoyStartMW-FLmwXC14.jpgFootLocker Cross Country, Midwest, November 2014, photo by PhotoRun.net

In the next couple weeks, 22 weeks of training and racing comes down to fifteen to thirty minutes of racing. Will you be ready? During the next two weeks, remember to rest, focus and hydrate.

Week 20, Day Five, October 30, 2015, Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: Hard Day

Here are three options for this day of the week:

1. Race Day

a. Warm up, with one to two miles, and some stride outs, 5k race, then, one of the following:

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Go to your conference meet course, warm up, run the course like this: run the first mile at race pace, jog half mile, run hard half mile, jog half mile, run last half mile of course hard, cooldown.

3. Warm up, 3 x mile @ 5k race pace, half mile jog, 4x200 meters on track, 90 percent effort, cooldown.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Race Day 1

1. Race Day, warm up well, some strideouts, 5k race, cool down a bit, then, one of the following:

a. Hill work, 1-mile warmup; 9 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start; repeat 8 times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds and then do your 1-mile easy cool-down.

2. Warm up, go to track, 12 times 400 meters at 5k race pace, 200 meter jog, finish with 4x 300 meters, at finish speed pace, cooldown.

3. Warm up, 3 miles on track, 200 meters, race pace, 200 meters moderate pace, repeat 12 times, cooldown.

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day 2

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, try one of the following:

1. Run the race course again, run three minutes hard, three minutes easy, three times, cooldown.

2. Run an easy four miles, then, go three hundred meters from finish, and practice, six times.

3. Run 5k course, first mile take easy, increase pace in second mile, run final mile at race pace, finish hard, cooldown.

Sunday: Easy 7-11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are recovering from the racing.

Keitany_Mary1i-Kenya12.jpgMary Keitany, February 2012, photo by PhotoRun.net

Mary Keitany is defending her title from 2014. In this interview by Cathal Dennehy, Mary makes it quite clear that she is ready to roll here in the Big Apple. And a note to her rivals: she believes that she is fitter than last year.

Less than two months ago, I watched Mary Keitany win the Great Nort Run by over two minutes, running relentlessly, as she raced most of the way by herself. She told us then that she was preparing for a marathon in the fall.

Let us see how she fares in 2015 in the Big Apple.

mkisolator_package.jpgMK Isolator, photo courtesy of Etymotic

As one could expect, RunBlogRun gets many requests to "blog" about products and offers of other dubious nature. I have never been asked to review a left nostril inhailer, and still have not. Sorry, that was a digression.

However, sometimes, I find a product that I like and this is the case with Etymotic earphones. I have used them for most of the last year, and I am listening to Joni Mitchell (Help Me), after some Grand Master Flash right now. If you like music, these are the most minamalist that I have found that give me the sound quality I want to have, scratch that, need to have, when listening from the New Riders to Lou Reed, and much in between (tonight, I am in a retro mood).

I use them while I am watching movies on Lufthansa and United in my travels as well. Sound is much better than those offered by the planes. And they are easy to keep in my travel bags.

The nice things about Etymotic The Isolator is that the sound quality is primo, and I can hear marauding cars, and bike messangers, as well as other denizens of the night. Walking around West 28th street tonight to West 23rd to the Malibu Cafe, I can unwind with my music and still observe and hear my environs.

I have old school earphones as well, but I have just favored these for the past six months or so. I am not making any money on this, and just encourage you to check out the brand. A great product, at a good price and they last.

ciacca and kipsang.jpgPeter Ciaccia with Wilson Kipsang, photo by Chris Lotsbom for RRW, used with permission
Wilson Kipsang is one of the best marathon racers in the world. In 2014, when he won the London Marathon, I queried him when he knew he had won over Mo Farah. Kipsang looked me in the eye, and with out a moment's hesitation, " at the start when he had his own pacer." Kipsang gets it. To win you have to play.
Kipsang had a rough one at Beijing. He shook himself off and prepared for the Big Apple, and he is here, and he wants to race, and churn up the roads in the Five Boroughs.
Here is a fine piece from our friend and colleague, Chris Lotsbom, who spends his time between Boston and New York, writing about the sport he loves. We use his piece with permission from Race Results Weekly.

How does one describe Meb Keflezighi?

Keflezighi_Meb-Boston15.jpgMeb Keflezighi, Boston 2015, photo by PhotoRun.net

His win in New York had me in tears.

His 2013 struggle teared me up too.

Meb is real, and that is why normal runners get him and love him.

He is also one of the best championship runners I know. The guy knows how to race and if his competitors are foolhardy enough to give him some real estate, then, they are going to learn another lesson.

As I arrived at the NYRR Media Center & Pavilion, I asked Coach Larsen, " how many weeks of training, 5 1/2?"

I do that as Meb has averaged about 5-8 injury free weeks between his best marathons. " No, Meb has been in great training for most of summer and fall, except for a couple weeks with a cold."

Meb does not know he is 40, but his body does. He and Coach Larsen are quite careful with his training and rest.

Here is a fine piece by RRW's Chris Lotsbom on Meb Keflezighi, 2004 Olympic silver medalist, Boston and New York City Marathon champion, and a man for all marathons.

The genesis of a new product and a new company are fascinating.

In this blog, you, RunBlogRun readers, are going to see a new company (EdgeGear) and a new product (the SHIFT watch band) be born and grow, and you will actually, if you like this product and support the kickstarter campaign, which starts on 10/29/15, you will be able to purchase the product.

This is our first time working with such a program and we are quite excited! I have tried the test product as has Cregg Weinmann, our product review editor. The product is quite innovative and provides a very different approach to an endurance athlete watch or fitness monitor band. I like that one does not have to look down, as with normal watches, but can just bring ones' hand up to see time, or whatever function one needs.

I am always curious, and anyone who reads RunBlogRun can attest, to the nature of invention and the creation of new companies. You, kind readers, will play a huge part in whether this product is a success, as you are the key influencers.

So, please check out the video on the SHIFT watch band and read the interview below on the company! To sign up on KickStarter to support the SHIFT watchband and get the product, go here: http://kck.st/1PSeeOX

BoysHill-FLmwXC14.jpg

Week 20, Day 4, October 29, 2015:

Thursday: Race Day 1

1. Race Day, warm up well, some strideouts, 5k race, cool down a bit, then, one of the following:

a. Hill work, 1-mile warmup; 9 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start; repeat 8 times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds and then do your 1-mile easy cool-down.

2. Warm up, go to track, 12 times 400 meters at 5k race pace, 200 meter jog, finish with 4x 300 meters, at finish speed pace, cooldown.

3. Warm up, 3 miles on track, 200 meters, race pace, 200 meters moderate pace, repeat 12 times, cooldown.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: Hard Day

Here are three options for this day of the week:

1. Race Day

a. Warm up, with one to two miles, and some stride outs, 5k race, then, one of the following:

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Go to your conference meet course, warm up, run the course like this: run the first mile at race pace, jog half mile, run hard half mile, jog half mile, run last half mile of course hard, cooldown.

3. Warm up, 3 x mile @ 5k race pace, half mile jog, 4x200 meters on track, 90 percent effort, cooldown.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Race Day 1

1. Race Day, warm up well, some strideouts, 5k race, cool down a bit, then, one of the following:

a. Hill work, 1-mile warmup; 9 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start; repeat 8 times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds and then do your 1-mile easy cool-down.

2. Warm up, go to track, 12 times 400 meters at 5k race pace, 200 meter jog, finish with 4x 300 meters, at finish speed pace, cooldown.

3. Warm up, 3 miles on track, 200 meters, race pace, 200 meters moderate pace, repeat 12 times, cooldown.

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day 2

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, try one of the following:

1. Run the race course again, run three minutes hard, three minutes easy, three times, cooldown.

2. Run an easy four miles, then, go three hundred meters from finish, and practice, six times.

3. Run 5k course, first mile take easy, increase pace in second mile, run final mile at race pace, finish hard, cooldown.

Sunday: Easy 7-11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are recovering from the racing.

On Tuesday, October 27, I attended the first AKTIVagainstCancer Luncheon, honoring Mary Wittenberg, recently the CEO of the New York Road Runners and now, CEO of the Virgin Sports company.

AKTIVagainstCancer was founded by Hella Aanesen, with Grete Waitz. Now, with 12 sites in Norway and one in Ethiopia, AKTIV is supported by adidas and has the stated goal of providing assistance to cancer patient to develop exercise programs. AKTIV is supporting several research projects at Sloan Kettering's Cancer center (the Zuckerman Cancer Center) to determine if exercise assists cancer patients in battling their cancers.

roadrunners.JPG

AKTIVagainstCancer Luncheon: Jack Waitz- AKTIV Against Cancer, Mary Wittenberg- Global CEO of Virgin Sport, Michael Capiraso- Road Runners,Helle Aanesen- AKTIV Against Cancer, George Hirsch- Road Runners, photo courtesy of AKTIV and adidas.

FinishArea-Frankfurt15.JPGFrankfurt Marathon, photo by PhotoRun.net

FRANKFURT (GER): Asics has renewed their deal as the lead sponsor of the Frankfurt Marathon, report SportsPro. The Japanese sportswear brand has supported the German distance race since 1987 and will continue to do so until 2020 as a result of the five year extension.

Editor's note: The Frankfurt marathon is one of the fastest marathons in Germany. ASICS sponsorship will be well recieved by the community. Marathon sponsorship is getting more and more expensive. For many marathons, extending key relationships such as the one between ASICS and Frankfurt Marathon, only makes sense. The finish area of the Frankfurt marathon combines a light show with a race finish.

Justin Lagat wrote this piece on the StanChart Nairobi Marathon, which had an exciting elite finish and a surprise finisher (or non-finisher, you will have to decide).

Gabius_ArneFV-Frankfurt15.JPG

Canova believes in Gabius
FRANKFURT (GER): Renowned Coach Renato Canova believes that German marathon record holder Arne Gabius can achieve a "high placing" at next year Olympics, informs Race News Service. The Italian coach, who is advising Gabius, said "I can believe he will improve still further in the marathon and achieve a high placing in the Olympics but probably his best chance will be at the World Championships in 2017." Gabius is also confident in his ability to perform in championship marathons, saying, "If I have a really good day in Rio, I might finish inside the top 10 and that would be fantastic." Next up for Gabius is his wedding, which will take place in the USA shortly.

Editor's note: Arne Gabius told me that Renato Canova was one tough coach. But, as he worked his butt off, Gabius also bought into Canova's training methods. In 2014, Arne opened with a fine 2:09:33. In 2015, Gabius ran 2:08:32, for fourth in Frankfurt.

I have watched Gabius on the European circuit the past couple of summers, over the 5,000 meters and 10,000 meters, as he built towards the marathon distance. Now the record holder in the marathon in Germany, Arne Gabius may have found his distance.

22442179636_7e5b9bb95b_o.jpgThe T42 100 meters , photo by IPC

Stuart Weir noted that the T42 100 metes has a fascinating diversity among its competitors. In this column, Stuart delves into the challenges in classifications for the athletes in the 100 meters and 200 meters in T42.

Steve & Carolyn Mather were two of the most delightful people that I would see on the race circuit each and every year. Steve and I would always catch up at Boston and New York. I will not see my friend at the major races anymore, as he died recently, after a tough battle with cancer.

This piece was published originally in Running Journal (http://running.net/read_new/man-all-seasons---my-steve). I encourage you to check out Running Journal and Racing South-who have chronicled our sport in the Southern US for three plus decades.

Thanks to Carolyn for her tribute to her husband, Steve Mather.

Fisher-Reiser-Hersha-FLmwXC14.jpgFootLocker Midwest, November 2014, photo by PhotoRun.net

Week 20, Day 3, October 28, 2015, Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: Hard Day

Here are three options for this day of the week:

1. Race Day

a. Warm up, with one to two miles, and some stride outs, 5k race, then, one of the following:

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Go to your conference meet course, warm up, run the course like this: run the first mile at race pace, jog half mile, run hard half mile, jog half mile, run last half mile of course hard, cooldown.

3. Warm up, 3 x mile @ 5k race pace, half mile jog, 4x200 meters on track, 90 percent effort, cooldown.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Race Day 1

1. Race Day, warm up well, some strideouts, 5k race, cool down a bit, then, one of the following:

a. Hill work, 1-mile warmup; 9 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start; repeat 8 times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds and then do your 1-mile easy cool-down.

2. Warm up, go to track, 12 times 400 meters at 5k race pace, 200 meter jog, finish with 4x 300 meters, at finish speed pace, cooldown.

3. Warm up, 3 miles on track, 200 meters, race pace, 200 meters moderate pace, repeat 12 times, cooldown.

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day 2

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, try one of the following:

1. Run the race course again, run three minutes hard, three minutes easy, three times, cooldown.

2. Run an easy four miles, then, go three hundred meters from finish, and practice, six times.

3. Run 5k course, first mile take easy, increase pace in second mile, run final mile at race pace, finish hard, cooldown.

Sunday: Easy 7-11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are recovering from the racing.

22311341648_a0996bc8aa_o.jpgMarcel Hug, photo by IPC

Stuart Weir reminds us how rivalries excite the fans. Expected rivalries and surprised new challengers for the throne are what make a sport riveting.

Kipsang-Barsoton-KenyaXC15.jpgKenyan XC Trials, photo by PhotoRun.net

A track trials is one thing. A cross country trials is another, but a marathon trials is another completely different kettle of fish. We applaud the Athletics Kenya federation on reconsidering their idea to hold a trials in February. Ideas are important to consider, but it also is important to admit when it just does not make sense.

No special marathon trials
NAIROBI (KEN): Athletics Kenya has decided to cancel their plans to hold a trial in order to pick their team for the Rio 2016 marathon, reports Michelle Katami. Their decision to cancel came after consultations with athletes, coaches and other stakeholders. They will now pick their team based on performances up to the end of April 2016. They plan to announce the team on May 1.

jos.jpgJo Butterfield and her club throw, photo courtesy of IPC

Stuart Weir's column on Jo Butterfield, really affected m. After a week of frustratrations, I was feeling pretty sorry for myself. Reading the last two stories on the IPC championships, I am sharing Stu's admiration for the IPC athletes and also the idea of that athletes, in all forms, remind us what is important. Taking on challenges and finding what we are truly made of is what makes us athletes or admirers of athletes.

Jo Butterfield found the club throw, and has made the event hers.

I hope you go back and re read each of Stuart Weir's columns this past week on the IPC World Championships and follow them until their end, on 10/31.

DSCN7426.JPGGeoffrey Kamworor, October 23, 2015, photo by Justin Lagat

Justin Lagat did this interview of Geoffrey Kamworor last week, just as Geoffrey was finishing his training for the TCS New York City marathon.

Geoffrey is World half marathon champion, World Cross Country Champion and second place in the 10,000 meters World Championships.

His 10,000 meters was brilliant and gutty. I am fascinated to see how he will fare in the Big Apple against Wilson Kipsang.

Here is Justin's piece on the new star, who is quite comfortable with his current training.

Fisher-Snider-Hersha-FLmwXC14.jpgFootLocker Midwest, November 2014, photo by PhotoRun.net

Week 20, Day Two, October 27, 2015, Tuesday: Hard Day

Here are three options for this day of the week:

1. Race Day

a. Warm up, with one to two miles, and some stride outs, 5k race, then, one of the following:

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Go to your conference meet course, warm up, run the course like this: run the first mile at race pace, jog half mile, run hard half mile, jog half mile, run last half mile of course hard, cooldown.

3. Warm up, 3 x mile @ 5k race pace, half mile jog, 4x200 meters on track, 90 percent effort, cooldown.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: Hard Day

Here are three options for this day of the week:

1. Race Day

a. Warm up, with one to two miles, and some stride outs, 5k race, then, one of the following:

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Go to your conference meet course, warm up, run the course like this: run the first mile at race pace, jog half mile, run hard half mile, jog half mile, run last half mile of course hard, cooldown.

3. Warm up, 3 x mile @ 5k race pace, half mile jog, 4x200 meters on track, 90 percent effort, cooldown.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Race Day 1

1. Race Day, warm up well, some strideouts, 5k race, cool down a bit, then, one of the following:

a. Hill work, 1-mile warmup; 9 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start; repeat 8 times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds and then do your 1-mile easy cool-down.

2. Warm up, go to track, 12 times 400 meters at 5k race pace, 200 meter jog, finish with 4x 300 meters, at finish speed pace, cooldown.

3. Warm up, 3 miles on track, 200 meters, race pace, 200 meters moderate pace, repeat 12 times, cooldown.

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day 2

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, try one of the following:

1. Run the race course again, run three minutes hard, three minutes easy, three times, cooldown.

2. Run an easy four miles, then, go three hundred meters from finish, and practice, six times.

3. Run 5k course, first mile take easy, increase pace in second mile, run final mile at race pace, finish hard, cooldown.

Sunday: Easy 7-11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are recovering from the racing.

21791936304_db20463e80_k.jpgAn IPC Award Ceremony, from IPC

Stuart Weir wrote this piece on the diversity and the complexity of the IPC Athletics World Championships. A piece worthy of your consideration, and a piece that has encouraged me to put an IPC champs on my bucket list.

So, this is one of my favorite columns each year by David Hunter. David opines on who should be the best male and female track athletes of the year! Tell us what you think!

Eaton_AshtonR-Glascow14.jpgAshton Eaton, photo by PhotoRun.net

BoysHill-FLmwXC14.jpgFootLocker Midwest, November 2014, photo by PhotoRun.net

Week 20, Day One, October 26, 2015, Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: Hard Day

Here are three options for this day of the week:

1. Race Day

a. Warm up, with one to two miles, and some stride outs, 5k race, then, one of the following:

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Go to your conference meet course, warm up, run the course like this: run the first mile at race pace, jog half mile, run hard half mile, jog half mile, run last half mile of course hard, cooldown.

3. Warm up, 3 x mile @ 5k race pace, half mile jog, 4x200 meters on track, 90 percent effort, cooldown.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Race Day 1

1. Race Day, warm up well, some strideouts, 5k race, cool down a bit, then, one of the following:

a. Hill work, 1-mile warmup; 9 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start; repeat 8 times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds and then do your 1-mile easy cool-down.

2. Warm up, go to track, 12 times 400 meters at 5k race pace, 200 meter jog, finish with 4x 300 meters, at finish speed pace, cooldown.

3. Warm up, 3 miles on track, 200 meters, race pace, 200 meters moderate pace, repeat 12 times, cooldown.

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day 2

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, try one of the following:

1. Run the race course again, run three minutes hard, three minutes easy, three times, cooldown.

2. Run an easy four miles, then, go three hundred meters from finish, and practice, six times.

3. Run 5k course, first mile take easy, increase pace in second mile, run final mile at race pace, finish hard, cooldown.

Sunday: Easy 7-11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are recovering from the racing.

22388711176_c1c206e3ef_k.jpgJake Lappin, after the crash, courtesy of the IPC

21791934384_7fd4fa7668_k.jpgThe crash, photo by PhotoRun.net

22226976338_146666ff87_k-2.jpgThe crash, photo by PhotoRun.net

Here are two commendation awards that Stuart Weir feels should be given around "the crash" in the Men's 1,500 meters.

PHOTO: Mary Cain after taking third place at the 2015 Boston Mayor's Cross Country meeting (photo by Chris Lotsbom for Race Results Weekly)
I like Mary Cain. I always have. I enjoyed that she loved racing so much. I enjoyed her ebullence over her competitions in high school and how kind she was to the media.
Then, Mary had a few bad races. And many turned on her. I found it sad, but also, part of the current media and social media frenzy.
Truth is, Mary spoiled us. Her joie de vivre, her honest energy in her racing was what caught us. When she had a few bad races, and when the feeding frenzy started last spring about Alberto, it had to be exhausting.
My hope is that Mary Cain gets back to enjoying running again. Being near her family, going to school, focusing on the road to Eugene (then RIO), are all that matter this year...
Here is a fine piece by Chris Lotsbom on Mary Cain. We, of course use RRW articles with permission.

Start-Frankfurt15.JPGFrankfurt Marathon, photo by PhotoRun.net

This was a busy weekend for marathons around the world. I really enjoy finding the updates from Alfons Juck and EME News each weekend with their races around the world!

Here is a piece on the RNR Vancouver Half Marathon that happened earlier today. Part of the RNR series, it continues to show the growth of our sport.

Dunbar_TrevorFHL-NBi15.jpgTrevor Dunbar, photo by PhotoRun.net

Trevor Dunbar is an example of how the American system is supposed to work. Trevor was a fine high school runner from Alaska, then matriculated to University of Portland, before finishing up at Oregon. Coming back from injuries, Trevor is opening his fall with fine form. Here is a piece on Trevor's win at the Boston Mayor's Cup today, by Chris Lotsbom.

Gabius_Arne-Frankfurt15.JPGArne Gabius, photo by PhotoRun.net

The 2015 Frankfurt marathon had ten thousand marathoners on the streets of one of the fastest courses in Germany. Arne Gabius ran his debut in Frankfurt last year. This summer, after his World Champs 10,000m run, we spoke and he told me that that he was focusing on a fall marathon.

His run in Frankfurt was classic Arne Gabius: smart pace, good mid race, gutty finish. In his drive over the final kilometers, Arne Gabius broke the 28 year old German record of Jorg Peter (2:08:47) with his fine 2:08:33 the fastest run by a European in 2015.

Ritzenhein_Dathan1-USAxc15.jpgDathan Ritzenhein, photo by PhotoRun.net

Dathan Ritzenhein is training to make his fourth Olympic team. Dathan was a fine cross country and track athlete in high school. In college, Dathan had some injury issues, but battled back. With a sub 13 minute PB at 5,000 meters (12:58.57) , sub 27:30 for 10,000m (27:22.28) and a 2:07:47 PB at the marathon. Through his entire career, Dathan has raced cross country. Coincidence that he is so successful?

Week 19, Day Seven, October 25, 2015, Sunday: Easy 7-11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are recovering from the racing.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: Hard Day

Here are three options for this day of the week:

1. Race Day

a. Warm up, with one to two miles, and some stride outs, 5k race, then, one of the following:

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Go to your conference meet course, warm up, run the course like this: run the first mile at race pace, jog half mile, run hard half mile, jog half mile, run last half mile of course hard, cooldown.

3. Warm up, 3 x mile @ 5k race pace, half mile jog, 4x200 meters on track, 90 percent effort, cooldown.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Race Day 1

1. Race Day, warm up well, some strideouts, 5k race, cool down a bit, then, one of the following:

a. Hill work, 1-mile warmup; 9 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start; repeat 8 times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds and then do your 1-mile easy cool-down.

2. Warm up, go to track, 12 times 400 meters at 5k race pace, 200 meter jog, finish with 4x 300 meters, at finish speed pace, cooldown.

3. Warm up, 3 miles on track, 200 meters, race pace, 200 meters moderate pace, repeat 12 times, cooldown.

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day 2

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, try one of the following:

1. Run the race course again, run three minutes hard, three minutes easy, three times, cooldown.

2. Run an easy four miles, then, go three hundred meters from finish, and practice, six times.

3. Run 5k course, first mile take easy, increase pace in second mile, run final mile at race pace, finish hard, cooldown.

Sunday: Easy 7-11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are recovering from the racing.

Kogo_Micah-Lisbon15.jpgMicah Kogo, photo by PhotoRun.net

Micah Kogo did this interview with Andy Edwards of Race News Service. Race News Service provides RunBlogRun and the RunningNetwork with interviews and updates from marathons around the world. Micah Kogo's interview was done pre race before the 2015 Frankfurt Marathon!

Stockhecke_Mona1-Frankfurt14.jpg
Mona Stockhecke, Frankfurt 2014, photo by PhotoRun.net

Race News Service's Andy Edwards interviewed Mona Stockhecke before the Frankfurt Marathon. Here is the audio interview that he sent us after the Frankfurt press conferences on October 22-23, 2015.


Trayvon Bromell.jpgTrayvon Bromell, photo from New Balance

Nice to see that one of the new stars of the sport is running indoors. With the World Indoor Champs in Portland in 2016, it would sure be nice to see Trayvon racing there! Looking forward to seeing Mr. Bromell racing this coming winter!

Curtis_Bobby-USAxc15.jpgBobby Curtis, photo by PhotoRun.net

Week 19, Day Six, October 24, 2015, Saturday:

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, try one of the following:

1. Run the race course again, run three minutes hard, three minutes easy, three times, cooldown.

2. Run an easy four miles, then, go three hundred meters from finish, and practice, six times.

3. Run 5k course, first mile take easy, increase pace in second mile, run final mile at race pace, finish hard, cooldown.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: Hard Day

Here are three options for this day of the week:

1. Race Day

a. Warm up, with one to two miles, and some stride outs, 5k race, then, one of the following:

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Go to your conference meet course, warm up, run the course like this: run the first mile at race pace, jog half mile, run hard half mile, jog half mile, run last half mile of course hard, cooldown.

3. Warm up, 3 x mile @ 5k race pace, half mile jog, 4x200 meters on track, 90 percent effort, cooldown.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Race Day 1

1. Race Day, warm up well, some strideouts, 5k race, cool down a bit, then, one of the following:

a. Hill work, 1-mile warmup; 9 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start; repeat 8 times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds and then do your 1-mile easy cool-down.

2. Warm up, go to track, 12 times 400 meters at 5k race pace, 200 meter jog, finish with 4x 300 meters, at finish speed pace, cooldown.

3. Warm up, 3 miles on track, 200 meters, race pace, 200 meters moderate pace, repeat 12 times, cooldown.

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day 2

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, try one of the following:

1. Run the race course again, run three minutes hard, three minutes easy, three times, cooldown.

2. Run an easy four miles, then, go three hundred meters from finish, and practice, six times.

3. Run 5k course, first mile take easy, increase pace in second mile, run final mile at race pace, finish hard, cooldown.

Sunday: Easy 7-11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are recovering from the racing.

22401498972_e04c949341_k-2.jpgMarkus Rehm, photo from IPC

Markus Rehm cleared 8.40m to win the T44 Long Jump at the 2015 IPC Athletics World Champs. It is also ironic to note the Mr. Rehm won the German Athletics LJ this year in 8.24m, but would not be allowed to compete in the World Champs.

Stuart Weir raises the question once again about prosthetic limbs, do they give athletes an advantage? What do you think?

Ibarguen_Caterine1b-Brussels15.jpgCaterine Ibuarguen, Triple Jump, photo by PhotoRun.net

Wlodarczyk_Anita1b-Beijing15.jpgAnita Wlodarczyk, Hammer Throw, photo by PhotoRun.net

So, who has the best streaks at the end of 2015? Here is what EME News found....

21788512084_494a6e79b1_k.jpgDOHA, QATAR - OCTOBER 22: Girisha Hosanagara Nagarajegowda of India in action during the men's high jump T42 final during the Evening Session on Day One of the IPC Athletics World Championships at Suhaim Bin Hamad Stadium on October 22, 2015 in Doha, Qatar.

21790177973_f4878d2260_k.jpg

Thuraya competes in the London 2012 Paralympic Games.jpgThuraya al Zaabi, 2012 London Olympics, photo by IPC

In his second column on the IPC Athletics World Championships, Stuart Weir wrote a piece on Muslim women and sports. He featured Thuraya al Zaabi, who competes in the shot put and javelin.


Masses-Campaccio15.jpg Cross Country in Italy, February 2015, photo by PhotoRun.net

Week 19, Day Five, Friday, October 23, 2015: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: Hard Day

Here are three options for this day of the week:

1. Race Day

a. Warm up, with one to two miles, and some stride outs, 5k race, then, one of the following:

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Go to your conference meet course, warm up, run the course like this: run the first mile at race pace, jog half mile, run hard half mile, jog half mile, run last half mile of course hard, cooldown.

3. Warm up, 3 x mile @ 5k race pace, half mile jog, 4x200 meters on track, 90 percent effort, cooldown.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Race Day 1

1. Race Day, warm up well, some strideouts, 5k race, cool down a bit, then, one of the following:

a. Hill work, 1-mile warmup; 9 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start; repeat 8 times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds and then do your 1-mile easy cool-down.

2. Warm up, go to track, 12 times 400 meters at 5k race pace, 200 meter jog, finish with 4x 300 meters, at finish speed pace, cooldown.

3. Warm up, 3 miles on track, 200 meters, race pace, 200 meters moderate pace, repeat 12 times, cooldown.

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day 2

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, try one of the following:

1. Run the race course again, run three minutes hard, three minutes easy, three times, cooldown.

2. Run an easy four miles, then, go three hundred meters from finish, and practice, six times.

3. Run 5k course, first mile take easy, increase pace in second mile, run final mile at race pace, finish hard, cooldown.

Sunday: Easy 7-11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are recovering from the racing.

The Women's Division 1 Cross Country is fluid this season, lots of changes as the USTFCCCA rankings tell us for this past weekend!

Marathon & Beyond sent out its last issue with the November/December 2015 issue, per this column from RW online.

Marathon & Beyond was a unique publication in the world or running. Focused on the marathon, but truly focused on long-form writing on all things running, Marathon & Beyond held its place for nineteen years in the running media world.

The media world changes daily, and not all for the better. Truth is, niche magazines are thriving, as while social media and websites have aided some magazines's growth, for most publishing companies, they do much more work for less money. It is not enough to publish a fine print title. If one listens to the media experts, then, magazines must have a strong website, social media presense, newsletter and video content, then, how does one survive? But how does one do that with a small staff?

Marathon & Beyond battled those winds for 19 years, listening to their own drummer. They decided that it was time to call it a day, knowing perhaps, that they could not provide the magazine in the future that the remaining readers had come to expect.

In my mind, the end of Marathon & Beyond is a huge loss to the sport and the running community. We wish Jan Seeley, Rich Benyo and the rest of the publication team the very best.

If you want to keep track of college cross country, indoor or outdoor track,then, go to one place, the USTFCCCA.org site. We have posted the Men's Final team rankings for the 2015 season!

WomenStart-Campaccio15.jpgCross Country is a global sport. From Kenya to Italy, from Chiba, Japan to Goteborg, Sweden, and all countries in between, one of the most wonderfully gasp inducing portions of our sport is cross country. You are not just part of a high school team, you are part of a global movement that breathes, and gasps for air up each hill, just like you!

Week 19, Day four, RunBlogRun Fall Cross Country Challenge, October 22, 2015, Thursday:

Thursday: Race Day 1

1. Race Day, warm up well, some strideouts, 5k race, cool down a bit, then, one of the following:

a. Hill work, 1-mile warmup; 9 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start; repeat 8 times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds and then do your 1-mile easy cool-down.

2. Warm up, go to track, 12 times 400 meters at 5k race pace, 200 meter jog, finish with 4x 300 meters, at finish speed pace, cooldown.

3. Warm up, 3 miles on track, 200 meters, race pace, 200 meters moderate pace, repeat 12 times, cooldown.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: Hard Day

Here are three options for this day of the week:

1. Race Day

a. Warm up, with one to two miles, and some stride outs, 5k race, then, one of the following:

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Go to your conference meet course, warm up, run the course like this: run the first mile at race pace, jog half mile, run hard half mile, jog half mile, run last half mile of course hard, cooldown.

3. Warm up, 3 x mile @ 5k race pace, half mile jog, 4x200 meters on track, 90 percent effort, cooldown.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Race Day 1

1. Race Day, warm up well, some strideouts, 5k race, cool down a bit, then, one of the following:

a. Hill work, 1-mile warmup; 9 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start; repeat 8 times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds and then do your 1-mile easy cool-down.

2. Warm up, go to track, 12 times 400 meters at 5k race pace, 200 meter jog, finish with 4x 300 meters, at finish speed pace, cooldown.

3. Warm up, 3 miles on track, 200 meters, race pace, 200 meters moderate pace, repeat 12 times, cooldown.

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day 2

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, try one of the following:

1. Run the race course again, run three minutes hard, three minutes easy, three times, cooldown.

2. Run an easy four miles, then, go three hundred meters from finish, and practice, six times.

3. Run 5k course, first mile take easy, increase pace in second mile, run final mile at race pace, finish hard, cooldown.

Sunday: Easy 7-11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are recovering from the racing.

2015_IPC_Athletics_Wordl_Championships_Logo_(small).jpg

Stuart Weir is covering the IPC World Athletics Championships from Doha, Qatar for the Running Network and RunBlogRun. This is the first of his daily doses from Doha. We hope that you enjoy it!

Gebreselassie-RadcliffeR-Vienna12.jpgHaile and Paula, Vienna, 2012, phot by PhotoRun.net

One of my favorite parts of the New York City Marathon week are the awards. The Hall of Fame Awards will honor four of our finest distance runners: Haile Gebrselassie, Paula Radcliffe, Tegla Loroupe and Paul Tergat. The towering figures of their generations. Haile and Paul competed in 10,000 meters in Atlanta and Sydney that were two of the greatest races of all times. Tegla with the Kenyan pocket rocket-her small demeanor hid her fierce competitiveness. Paula Radcliffe ran where no woman has ever run, and her body has paid that price of the sport trail blazer.

I have to say though, my favorite moment will be watching Marc Bloom get the George A. Hirsch Award for Journalism. Marc edited The Runner magazine at its height. His labor of love, the Harrier, was cross country running for two decades. It will be nice to see Marc get recognition for his life long body of work. I will expect a good joke as well. The late James Dunaway, Bloom's mentor, would approve.

Wittenberg_Mary-WorldMM06.jpgMary Wittenberg, photo by PhotoRun.net

It is quite appropriate that the first AKTIV Against Cancer Award goes to CEO of Virgin Sport, Mary Wittenberg. Mary Wittenberg championed the opportunities for women in sports and business, concepts dear to the heart of Grete Waitz.

Grete Waitz became a true citizen of New York with her nine victories in the Big Apple. She contributed to the marathon's legacy and growth, from her 9 wins to her emotional run with Fred Lebow, the quixotic race director of the Five Bouroughs race.

Grete Waitz comprehended the value and importance of the women's movement within running. She also saw that, in her battle with cancer, that something was needed. The AKTIV Against Cancer Award is a wonderful example of the vitality of the movement co-founded in 2007 by the late, and always great, Grete Waitz. It is Grete's legacy.

The AKTIV Award is a fitting addition to the legacy of the great Norweigian runner.

Congrats to Mary Wittenberg!

She is missed by all who knew her.

WomenLeaders-KenyaXC15.jpgKenyan XC Champs, February 2015, photo by PhotoRun.net

Week 19, Day Three, October 21, 2015, Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: Hard Day

Here are three options for this day of the week:

1. Race Day

a. Warm up, with one to two miles, and some stride outs, 5k race, then, one of the following:

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Go to your conference meet course, warm up, run the course like this: run the first mile at race pace, jog half mile, run hard half mile, jog half mile, run last half mile of course hard, cooldown.

3. Warm up, 3 x mile @ 5k race pace, half mile jog, 4x200 meters on track, 90 percent effort, cooldown.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Race Day 1

1. Race Day, warm up well, some strideouts, 5k race, cool down a bit, then, one of the following:

a. Hill work, 1-mile warmup; 9 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start; repeat 8 times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds and then do your 1-mile easy cool-down.

2. Warm up, go to track, 12 times 400 meters at 5k race pace, 200 meter jog, finish with 4x 300 meters, at finish speed pace, cooldown.

3. Warm up, 3 miles on track, 200 meters, race pace, 200 meters moderate pace, repeat 12 times, cooldown.

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day 2

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, try one of the following:

1. Run the race course again, run three minutes hard, three minutes easy, three times, cooldown.

2. Run an easy four miles, then, go three hundred meters from finish, and practice, six times.

3. Run 5k course, first mile take easy, increase pace in second mile, run final mile at race pace, finish hard, cooldown.

Sunday: Easy 7-11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are recovering from the racing.

Nike Campus.jpgThe Nike Campus

Z18.jpg

The family Benjamin with statue of Steve Prefontaine (Roseann, Amanda, Brianna, Jeff)

Jeff Benjamin has written for me for twenty-five years now. A keen observer of the sport, Jeff gives us a few that many will never see. Jeff is both fan, runner and writer.

He has been quite excited about this story all summer. I have received a few notes from Jeff asking when I was scheduling the story.

I have to admit, I have been to the Nike campus probably fifty times and Jeff's reverence and observations remind me of how special the campus truly is.

Nice to see Cyndy Poor-Jensen, who I remember on the Cindergals in the mid 1970s, and Margot Fleming, Tom Fleming's daughter on campus.

The plaques are fascinating to me, and Jeff's photos of them add to the tour.

Enjoy.


Koech_Gladys-KenyaXC15.jpgGladys Koech, Ken

On a hard day, after your race is done, cooldown and get on with the next part of the day's training. Take your easy days easy and learn on your hard days. Less than a month left for many, and less than two months left for the nationals.

Week 19, Day Two, October 20, 2015, Tuesday:

Tuesday: Hard Day

Here are three options for this day of the week:

1. Race Day

a. Warm up, with one to two miles, and some stride outs, 5k race, then, one of the following:

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Go to your conference meet course, warm up, run the course like this: run the first mile at race pace, jog half mile, run hard half mile, jog half mile, run last half mile of course hard, cooldown.

3. Warm up, 3 x mile @ 5k race pace, half mile jog, 4x200 meters on track, 90 percent effort, cooldown.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: Hard Day

Here are three options for this day of the week:

1. Race Day

a. Warm up, with one to two miles, and some stride outs, 5k race, then, one of the following:

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Go to your conference meet course, warm up, run the course like this: run the first mile at race pace, jog half mile, run hard half mile, jog half mile, run last half mile of course hard, cooldown.

3. Warm up, 3 x mile @ 5k race pace, half mile jog, 4x200 meters on track, 90 percent effort, cooldown.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Race Day 1

1. Race Day, warm up well, some strideouts, 5k race, cool down a bit, then, one of the following:

a. Hill work, 1-mile warmup; 9 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start; repeat 8 times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds and then do your 1-mile easy cool-down.

2. Warm up, go to track, 12 times 400 meters at 5k race pace, 200 meter jog, finish with 4x 300 meters, at finish speed pace, cooldown.

3. Warm up, 3 miles on track, 200 meters, race pace, 200 meters moderate pace, repeat 12 times, cooldown.

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day 2

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, try one of the following:

1. Run the race course again, run three minutes hard, three minutes easy, three times, cooldown.

2. Run an easy four miles, then, go three hundred meters from finish, and practice, six times.

3. Run 5k course, first mile take easy, increase pace in second mile, run final mile at race pace, finish hard, cooldown.

Sunday: Easy 7-11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are recovering from the racing.

Demise_ShureFV-Toronto15.JPGShure Demise wins Toronto Waterfront, photo by PhotoRun.net

Our friends at EME News provide us daily updates on the world of athletics, here is their overview of the world of road racing for October 17-18, 2015.

Nineteen weeks into our season, and the racing is twice a week for most high school teams. Your racing is coming around. Now is the time to focus on the fine tuning.

Week 19, Day One, October 19, 2015

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: Hard Day

Here are three options for this day of the week:

1. Race Day

a. Warm up, with one to two miles, and some stride outs, 5k race, then, one of the following:

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Go to your conference meet course, warm up, run the course like this: run the first mile at race pace, jog half mile, run hard half mile, jog half mile, run last half mile of course hard, cooldown.

3. Warm up, 3 x mile @ 5k race pace, half mile jog, 4x200 meters on track, 90 percent effort, cooldown.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Race Day 1

1. Race Day, warm up well, some strideouts, 5k race, cool down a bit, then, one of the following:

a. Hill work, 1-mile warmup; 9 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start; repeat 8 times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds and then do your 1-mile easy cool-down.

2. Warm up, go to track, 12 times 400 meters at 5k race pace, 200 meter jog, finish with 4x 300 meters, at finish speed pace, cooldown.

3. Warm up, 3 miles on track, 200 meters, race pace, 200 meters moderate pace, repeat 12 times, cooldown.

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day 2

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, try one of the following:

1. Run the race course again, run three minutes hard, three minutes easy, three times, cooldown.

2. Run an easy four miles, then, go three hundred meters from finish, and practice, six times.

3. Run 5k course, first mile take easy, increase pace in second mile, run final mile at race pace, finish hard, cooldown.

Sunday: Easy 7-11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are recovering from the racing.

The European Athletics meetings this past week were a meeting of many of the key players in the sport. The traditional calendar meeting was enhanced with Seb Coe, IAAF President, announcing some of his first steps to energize our sport. It is important to see the European Athletics Association using social media so well with their Golden Tracks awards!

Congrats to Greg Rutherford and Dafne Schippers !

Thumbnail image for BoysMidwestStart-FootLocker14.JPGFootLocker 2014, Midwest start, photo by PhotoRun.net

Week 18, Day Seven, October 18, 2015, Sunday: Easy 7-11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are recovering from the racing.

The races are coming, one after another. Conferences, Regionals, all of the big ones! Use your hard days to prepare for the big races! Think about the goals for the end of the season!

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: Hard Day

Here are three options for this day of the week:

1. Race Day

a. Warm up, with one to two miles, and some stride outs, 5k race, then, one of the following:

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Go to your conference meet course, warm up, run the course like this: run the first mile at race pace, jog half mile, run hard half mile, jog half mile, run last half mile of course hard, cooldown.

3. Warm up, 3 x mile @ 5k race pace, half mile jog, 4x200 meters on track, 90 percent effort, cooldown.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Race Day 1

1. Race Day, warm up well, some strideouts, 5k race, cool down a bit, then, one of the following:

a. Hill work, 1-mile warmup; 9 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start; repeat 8 times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds and then do your 1-mile easy cool-down.

2. Warm up, go to track, 12 times 400 meters at 5k race pace, 200 meter jog, finish with 4x 300 meters, at finish speed pace, cooldown.

3. Warm up, 3 miles on track, 200 meters, race pace, 200 meters moderate pace, repeat 12 times, cooldown.

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day 2

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, try one of the following:

1. Run the race course again, run three minutes hard, three minutes easy, three times, cooldown.

2. Run an easy four miles, then, go three hundred meters from finish, and practice, six times.

3. Run 5k course, first mile take easy, increase pace in second mile, run final mile at race pace, finish hard, cooldown.

Sunday: Easy 7-11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are recovering from the racing.

Coaching Athletics Fall 2015.jpgCoaching Athletics Fall 2015 cover, design by Alex Larsen/Photo by PhotoRun.net

So, here is the story.

I liked Stuart Weir's recent piece on Team GB, I thought I would take Stu's idea and extrapolate.

Here we go:

Stuart Weir began writing for us in Beijing at the World Championships, in August 2015.

I like his sense of humor and his skill at observation of the fact or view that most of us might miss.

Stu told me that he was a bit of an optimist. I think his view of Team GB is spot on.

The talent in the British Isles is continuing to impress. In some ways, Federations need to support where needed and stand back and smile when things are working well. A current generation of British athletes continues to impress and a new generation is full of promise.

That promise continues.

Asher_DinaQ-Beijing15.jpg

Dina Asher-Smith, photo by PhotoRun.net

Coe_Seb-Zurich15.jpgSeb Coe, Zurich, 2015, photo by PhotoRun.net

At the last press conference for IAAF outgoing president Lamine Diack, and the first presser of the incoming IAAF President Seb Coe, Coe was at his best. Coe can be charming, thoughtful and presidential, all in the same conversation. In July 2015, at the London GP press conference, Coe noted that he was made for this job.

When the following press release came through, I was pleased. Seb Coe is living up to his promises: stream lining governance and opening the conversation with the global family. Note that Coe is also using Skype and modern social communication tools for meetings, saving money on travel and increasing the conversations with key players.

We continue to watch Seb Coe in his first 100 days, and wish him well. No pressure to the four time Olympic medalist: his sport is looking to his vision, drive and enthusiasm.

Shorter_Frank1-VaBeach12.jpg

Frank Shorter, photo by PhotoRun.net

I remember reading about Frank Shorter in Sport magazine in my freshman year of high school, which was just after his win in Munich 1972.

In November 1974, Jim Fitzhenry, Bob Lucas and I snuck onto the AAU cross country course to see Frank Shorter run against the likes of John Ngegno, Nial Cusack, Marty Liquori, Ted Castenada, and many others on Crystal Springs course in Belmont. It was the first AAU Cross that Shorter had lost in four years.

We found Frank after the race and I remember telling him I was sorry he did not win (he took 11th that day). Frank was very cool with three worshipping 16 and 17 year olds. He told me he liked my sweats as he put on his tie dyed long underwear. We spent ten or fifteen minutes with Frank, and he was both charming and insightful. Forty-one years later, I am still grateful for his time and his comments.

For many years, Frank Shorter was a voice in the wilderness. He understood what it takes to be world class, and his unique talents and drive. I remember watching him battle over 10,000 meters in 1980 at the Martin Luther King Games on the Saturday, the night after I ran in the Open 10,000m. I also recall, at US Champs in 1984, Shorter and Jon Sinclair run a 28:44 for 10,000m on the San Jose City track.

David Hunter wrote this fine piece about Frank Shorter and his life long quest for protecting the sport that he so obviously loves.

lumo_run_lifestyle_capris.jpgLUMO lifestyle Capris, from LUMO Bodytech

lumo_run_lifestyle_shorts.jpgLUMO Run Shorts, from LUMO Bodytech

A fresh approach to running apparel with feedback: LUMO bodytech has just launched their new product with a technology that helps runners interested in improving their performance. The product was launched on October 7, 2015. Details on how to order and learn more about this exciting product is below this note!

Salel-SambuM-BaaHalf15.JPGSalel and Sambu, 2015 BAA Half, photo by PhotoRun.net

No matter what the distance, the race always comes down to how much you can call upon the trainning and racing you have done.

Week 18, Day Six, Saturday, October 17, 2015:

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, try one of the following:

1. Run the race course again, run three minutes hard, three minutes easy, three times, cooldown.

2. Run an easy four miles, then, go three hundred meters from finish, and practice your finish, six times. Then, of course, cooldown.

3. Run 5k course, first mile take easy, increase pace in second mile, run final mile at race pace, finish hard, cooldown.

The races are coming, one after another. Conferences, Regionals, all of the big ones! Use your hard days to prepare for the big races! Think about the goals for the end of the season!

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: Hard Day

Here are three options for this day of the week:

1. Race Day

a. Warm up, with one to two miles, and some stride outs, 5k race, then, one of the following:

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Go to your conference meet course, warm up, run the course like this: run the first mile at race pace, jog half mile, run hard half mile, jog half mile, run last half mile of course hard, cooldown.

3. Warm up, 3 x mile @ 5k race pace, half mile jog, 4x200 meters on track, 90 percent effort, cooldown.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Race Day 1

1. Race Day, warm up well, some strideouts, 5k race, cool down a bit, then, one of the following:

a. Hill work, 1-mile warmup; 9 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start; repeat 8 times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds and then do your 1-mile easy cool-down.

2. Warm up, go to track, 12 times 400 meters at 5k race pace, 200 meter jog, finish with 4x 300 meters, at finish speed pace, cooldown.

3. Warm up, 3 miles on track, 200 meters, race pace, 200 meters moderate pace, repeat 12 times, cooldown.

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day 2

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, try one of the following:

1. Run the race course again, run three minutes hard, three minutes easy, three times, cooldown.

2. Run an easy four miles, then, go three hundred meters from finish, and practice, six times.

3. Run 5k course, first mile take easy, increase pace in second mile, run final mile at race pace, finish hard, cooldown.

Sunday: Easy 7-11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are recovering from the racing.

Trayvon Bromell.jpgTrayvon Bromell, photo by New Balance communications

New Balance is upping their game in the support of track & field, as well as reaching out to the 14-25 year old market. Sponsoring a young sprinter, who is running faster than any young American sprinter, makes the news and gives NB an athlete to build up their brand in this key market.

How good is Trayvon Bromell? Only time will tell.

Getting into the sprint wars is costly. Companies such as Nike, adidas, PUMA and ASICS have spent many years and lots of money looking for the next great sprinter.

Usain Bolt has been the man of the last two Olympiads and his hoping for his third. Who will be the next sprinter to dominate the global scene?

Bromell looks like an athlete with lots of upside, so it will be fun to see him battling the best in the world with his Team New Balance gear.

Looking forward to the 2016 sprint wars....

Chumba-Kipsang-Bogota14.jpgDickson Chumba and Geoffrey Kamworor duel, photo by PhotoRun.net

Dickson Chumba won the Chicago Marathon on Sunday. Geoffrey Kamworor won gold in the 2014 World Champs Half Marathon, gold in the 2015 World Cross Country and silver in the 2015 World Championships 10,000 meters. Kamworor was known first as a fine cross country runner.

Week 18, Day Five, October 16, 2015, Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

The races are coming, one after another. Conferences, Regionals, all of the big ones! Use your hard days to prepare for the big races! Think about the goals for the end of the season!

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: Hard Day

Here are three options for this day of the week:

1. Race Day

a. Warm up, with one to two miles, and some stride outs, 5k race, then, one of the following:

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Go to your conference meet course, warm up, run the course like this: run the first mile at race pace, jog half mile, run hard half mile, jog half mile, run last half mile of course hard, cooldown.

3. Warm up, 3 x mile @ 5k race pace, half mile jog, 4x200 meters on track, 90 percent effort, cooldown.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Race Day 1

1. Race Day, warm up well, some strideouts, 5k race, cool down a bit, then, one of the following:

a. Hill work, 1-mile warmup; 9 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start; repeat 8 times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds and then do your 1-mile easy cool-down.

2. Warm up, go to track, 12 times 400 meters at 5k race pace, 200 meter jog, finish with 4x 300 meters, at finish speed pace, cooldown.

3. Warm up, 3 miles on track, 200 meters, race pace, 200 meters moderate pace, repeat 12 times, cooldown.

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day 2

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, try one of the following:

1. Run the race course again, run three minutes hard, three minutes easy,three times, cooldown.

2. Run an easy four miles, then, go three hundred meters from finish, and practice, six times.

3. Run 5k course, first mile take easy, increase pace in second mile, run final mile at race pace, finish hard, cooldown.

Sunday: Easy 7-11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are recovering from the racing.

chicagoraces156.jpgChumba racing Chicago, photo from Bank of America Chicago Marathon

New Marathon strategy for Kenya, from AFP (and EME News)


NAIROBI (KEN): Athletics Kenya has announced that their marathoners for Rio 2016 will be selected in a trial race in February, report AFP. The top three men and women will make the Kenyan team; selected athletes will not be allowed to run a marathon between February and the Olympics. This is part of a new strategy which is hoped to result in the country performing at a higher level at major championships.

Editor's comments: For many years, the high quality of Kenyan male and female distance runners was such that, no matter how competent or incompetent that the Kenyan Federation was, the quality of the athletes won out.

The recent drug cheating controversies showed that some did not understand: there are no short cuts. It also showed that some in the Federation did not believe that such a problem existed in Kenya. Great distance running comes from hard work, smart racing and focus. How could fine Kenyan athletes use drugs?

The Kenyan Federation has been under much scrutiny from inside Kenya and out. A national tradition, distance running has been debased, on their watch. Someone has to answer.

Short cuts have dirtied the reputation of many great runners who are clean, but who have been associated with cheating in their country. It is not fair, but, it is the fact of the times.

It is important to see that first steps are being done to clean up the sport in Kenya, but, it will take much time and diligence.

As there are no easy answers to end drug cheating in Kenya, there are no easy answers on how to send the best athletes to a World Championships or an Olympics.

I think it is fantastic that the Federation is looking to find answers on how to send the right Kenyan team to Rio in the marathon. But, they must be careful not to over react.

It is quite obvious that there are runners who chase times and runners who succeed in championships. The surreal world of global marathons has hurt some of the best Kenyan athletes, who do not know how to race in a championship due to relying on pace making.

The recent poor performances of Wilson Kipsang and Dennis Kimetto in Beijing are a case in point. Not prepared for the slow early pace, and then, the gradual, but increasing drive to the finish that a championship race entails, some are surprised when fast runners flounder in major championships. I felt bad that two such fantastic runners were obviously not prepared for the conditions. It is a different skill set.

Most medals in World Champs and Olympics are run where times are not exceptional. In many cases, the athletes who win medals have focused on the championship race, and who have prepared to race using championship tactics. The athletes who have the drive, the focus and the determination win out.

The skills of a great racer are cultivated over years of racing. Talent has to be there, desire has to be there, but each athlete's journey to reach that success is unique. Sophisticated coaching, and an understanding of the athlete, his or her needs and the challenges ahead are not found in a federation rule book.

Kudos to the Kenyan Federation on coming up with a strategy to pick and protect its marathon team for Rio. One wonders how much collaberation that there has been between elite athletes, coaches, and the Federation. One hopes that is the case.

Is it the right method?

We will not know until next summer...

Hall_Sara-Falmouth15.jpgSara Hall, Falmouth 2015, photo by PhotoRun.net

On Sunday, October 11, 2015, Sara Hall made herself a contender at the U.S. Olympic marathon Trials next February. Sara not only showed the running fans, but herself. Running a gutty race, Sara took 17 minutes off her debut and ran a fine 2:31 marathon. From high school cross country star to college champion, to elite runner for a decade, Sara Hall is a great example of calling within oneself and taking the challenge.

Week 18, Day four, October 15, 2015, Thursday: Thursday: Race Day 1

1. Race Day, warm up well, some strideouts, 5k race, cool down a bit, then, one of the following:

a. Hill work, 1-mile warmup; 9 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start; repeat 8 times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds and then do your 1-mile easy cool-down.

2. Warm up, go to track, 12 times 400 meters at 5k race pace, 200 meter jog, finish with 4x 300 meters, at finish speed pace, cooldown.

3. Warm up, 3 miles on track, 200 meters, race pace, 200 meters moderate pace, repeat 12 times, cooldown.

The races are coming, one after another. Conferences, Regionals, all of the big ones! Use your hard days to prepare for the big races! Think about the goals for the end of the season!

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: Hard Day

Here are three options for this day of the week:

1. Race Day

a. Warm up, with one to two miles, and some stride outs, 5k race, then, one of the following:

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Go to your conference meet course, warm up, run the course like this: run the first mile at race pace, jog half mile, run hard half mile, jog half mile, run last half mile of course hard, cooldown.

3. Warm up, 3 x mile @ 5k race pace, half mile jog, 4x200 meters on track, 90 percent effort, cooldown.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Race Day 1

1. Race Day, warm up well, some strideouts, 5k race, cool down a bit, then, one of the following:

a. Hill work, 1-mile warmup; 9 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start; repeat 8 times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds and then do your 1-mile easy cool-down.

2. Warm up, go to track, 12 times 400 meters at 5k race pace, 200 meter jog, finish with 4x 300 meters, at finish speed pace, cooldown.

3. Warm up, 3 miles on track, 200 meters, race pace, 200 meters moderate pace, repeat 12 times, cooldown.

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day 2

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, try one of the following:

1. Run the race course again, run three minutes hard, three minutes easy,three times, cooldown.

2. Run an easy four miles, then, go three hundred meters from finish, and practice, six times.

3. Run 5k course, first mile take easy, increase pace in second mile, run final mile at race pace, finish hard, cooldown.

Sunday: Easy 7-11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are recovering from the racing.

Huddle_MollyR-BAA5km15.jpgMolly Huddle, photo by PhotoRun.net

In September and October, Molly Huddle has won four major road races. In early September, it was the US 20k in New Haven. In late September, Huddle defended her 5k US title. On the first weekend of October, Molly blazed the 10 mile US title all by her lonesome.

And on Columbus Day, in Boston, Molly Huddle ran a PB while winning the Tufts 10k, the most iconic women's only 10k in our country. Running 31:21, Huddle shows that she is in a class of her own.

Here is Chris Lotsbom's feature on the Tufts' adventure.

GirlsJuniorLead-USAxc15.jpgUSA Juniors, photo by PhotoRun.net

The season is coming along. Your training all summer and now your callousing in the fall are putting the gas in the proverbial tank. Now, time to start testing. find your strengths, and find your weaknesses. Stay focused!

Week 18, Day Three, October 14, 2015, Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

The races are here, one after another. Conferences, Regionals, all of the big ones! Use your hard days to prepare for the big races! Think about the goals for the end of the season!

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: Hard Day

Here are three options for this day of the week:

1. Race Day

a. Warm up, with one to two miles, and some stride outs, 5k race, then, one of the following:

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Go to your conference meet course, warm up, run the course like this: run the first mile at race pace, jog half mile, run hard half mile, jog half mile, run last half mile of course hard, cooldown.

3. Warm up, 3 x mile @ 5k race pace, half mile jog, 4x200 meters on track, 90 percent effort, cooldown.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Race Day 1

1. Race Day, warm up well, some strideouts, 5k race, cool down a bit, then, one of the following:

a. Hill work, 1-mile warmup; 9 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start; repeat 8 times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds and then do your 1-mile easy cool-down.

2. Warm up, go to track, 12 times 400 meters at 5k race pace, 200 meter jog, finish with 4x 300 meters, at finish speed pace, cooldown.

3. Warm up, 3 miles on track, 200 meters, race pace, 200 meters moderate pace, repeat 12 times, cooldown.

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day 2

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, try one of the following:

1. Run the race course again, run three minutes hard, three minutes easy,three times, cooldown.

2. Run an easy four miles, then, go three hundred meters from finish, and practice, six times.

3. Run 5k course, first mile take easy, increase pace in second mile, run final mile at race pace, finish hard, cooldown.

Sunday: Easy 7-11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are recovering from the racing.

Salel-SambuH1-BaaHalf15.JPGSalel and Sambu battle, B.A.A. Half Marathon, Oct. 12, 2015, photo by PhotoRun.net

The B.A.A. Half Marathon and Distance Medley is one of the most creative ideas to come from a major marathon. I have always said that the Boston Marathon and B.A.A. iconic stature are two of the most under marketed brands in our sport. Well, that will be another column, but for today, here is Chris Lotsboms' fine piece on the race on Sunday. RRW is a subscription partner of Fortius Media and we use their columns with permission.

2015chicago1.jpgThe men's lead pack, 2015 Bank of America Chicago Marathon, photo courtesy of Bank of America Chicago Marathon

The 2015 Bank of America Chicago Marathon was a huge success. 40,000 plus starters, two great races up front, a wheelchair World best by Tatyana McFadden, and an American masters record by Deena Kastor were some of the highlights of the jewel of the Midwest.

Here is David Monti's RRW feature on the marathon. We, of course, use the RRW column with permission.

Puskedra_Luke1-HoustonM14.jpgLuke Puskedra, photo by PhotoRun.net

Luke Puskedra is our role model of the day. A fine college runner, Luke ran a 61:37 for the half marathon before his 21rst birthday! His first marathon in 2014, was not what the next best American marathoner was expecting-a 2:28. He retired from the sport, after loosing his sponsorship and team membership on the Nike Oregon Project.

As luck would have it, his wife, Trudie, and his college coach, Andy Powell, saw that he had more to run So, Luke started slowly. In June, Luke ran a 2:15:27 marathon, after only six months of training. On Sunday, October 11, Luke ran a 2:10:24, his PB by five minutes, after placing fifth in the Chicago marathon.

Of course, I would say much of that strength that Luke drew on, as he "sprinted" (his word) the last 10k of the marathon, was from his years of cross country. Cross country is the builder of milers and marathoners. Experience it!

Week 18, Day Two, October 13, 2015, Tuesday: Hard Day

Here are three options for this day of the week:

1. Race Day

a. Warm up, with one to two miles, and some stride outs, 5k race, then, one of the following:

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Go to your conference meet course, warm up, run the course like this: run the first mile at race pace, jog half mile, run hard half mile, jog half mile, run last half mile of course hard, cooldown.

3. Warm up, 3 x mile @ 5k race pace, half mile jog, 4x200 meters on track, 90 percent effort, cooldown.

The races are coming, one after another. Conferences, Regionals, all of the big ones! Use your hard days to prepare for the big races! Think about the goals for the end of the season!

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: Hard Day

Here are three options for this day of the week:

1. Race Day

a. Warm up, with one to two miles, and some stride outs, 5k race, then, one of the following:

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Go to your conference meet course, warm up, run the course like this: run the first mile at race pace, jog half mile, run hard half mile, jog half mile, run last half mile of course hard, cooldown.

3. Warm up, 3 x mile @ 5k race pace, half mile jog, 4x200 meters on track, 90 percent effort, cooldown.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Race Day 1

1. Race Day, warm up well, some strideouts, 5k race, cool down a bit, then, one of the following:

a. Hill work, 1-mile warmup; 9 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start; repeat 8 times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds and then do your 1-mile easy cool-down.

2. Warm up, go to track, 12 times 400 meters at 5k race pace, 200 meter jog, finish with 4x 300 meters, at finish speed pace, cooldown.

3. Warm up, 3 miles on track, 200 meters, race pace, 200 meters moderate pace, repeat 12 times, cooldown.

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day 2

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, try one of the following:

1. Run the race course again, run three minutes hard, three minutes easy, three times, cooldown.

2. Run an easy four miles, then, go three hundred meters from finish, and practice, six times.

3. Run 5k course, first mile take easy, increase pace in second mile, run final mile at race pace, finish hard, cooldown.

Sunday: Easy 7-11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are recovering from the racing.

Cathal Dennehy wrote this on Sunday about what we should learn from the Chicago marathon. Here is his take!

Chumba_Dickson-Bogota14.jpg
Dickson Chumba, photo by PhotoRun.net

deenakastor2015chimar5.jpgDeena Kastor, New U.S. Masters Marathon record of 2:27:47, from ASICS communications

Week 18, Day 1, October 12, 2015, Monday.

Deena Kastor set the AR Masters marathon record yesterday in Chicago. She ran 2:27:47 after running a 15:48 for 5k three weeks ago. Deena was a fine cross country and track runner in high school. Running for the University of Arkansas, Deena ran well in college. In 2004, after dedicating nearly a decade to world class running, Deena won the bronze medal in the Olympic marathon! Now, at 42, she is still racing! Must be the cross country!

The races are coming, one after another. Conferences, Regionals, all of the big ones! Use your hard days to prepare for the big races! Think about the goals for the end of the season!

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: Hard Day

Here are three options for this day of the week:

1. Race Day

a. Warm up, with one to two miles, and some stride outs, 5k race, then, one of the following:

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Go to your conference meet course, warm up, run the course like this: run the first mile at race pace, jog half mile, run hard half mile, jog half mile, run last half mile of course hard, cooldown.

3. Warm up, 3 x mile @ 5k race pace, half mile jog, 4x200 meters on track, 90 percent effort, cooldown.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Race Day 1

1. Race Day, warm up well, some strideouts, 5k race, cool down a bit, then, one of the following:

a. Hill work, 1-mile warmup; 9 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start; repeat 8 times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds and then do your 1-mile easy cool-down.

2. Warm up, go to track, 12 times 400 meters at 5k race pace, 200 meter jog, finish with 4x 300 meters, at finish speed pace, cooldown.

3. Warm up, 3 miles on track, 200 meters, race pace, 200 meters moderate pace, repeat 12 times, cooldown.

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day 2

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, try one of the following:

1. Run the race course again, run three minutes hard, three minutes easy, three times, cooldown.

2. Run an easy four miles, then, go three hundred meters from finish, and practice, six times.

3. Run 5k course, first mile take easy, increase pace in second mile, run final mile at race pace, finish hard, cooldown.

Sunday: Easy 7-11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are recovering from the racing.

On a week that Colleen de Reuck and her husband, Darren, were competing in the Ironman Triathlon, Deena Kastor paid Ms. De Reuck the greatest compliment: Kastor broke DeReuck's 2:28:40 U.S. Masters' record. En route, Deena also set a second master's record, of 1:45:04 at 30k!

deenakastor2015chimar5.jpgDeena Kastor, courtesy of ASICS communications

Puskedra_LukeRain-OlyTr12.jpg

Luke Puskedra ran a 61 minute half marathon about three years ago. His move to the marathon was to be a no-brainer, but, running 26.2 miles is barely ever that. In his debut in the marathon, Luke ran a less than expected 2:28.

So, he stopped running completely...

And, after a few months, with the support of his wife and his college coach, Andy Powell, he found running again, for the right reasons.

Puskedra's marathon performance is the story of a thoughtful runner, with the support of those who care for him, who took the time to re-examine his running and rebuild his confidence.

Luke's 2:10:24, a pb by five minutes, is the number three qualifier for the U.S. Olympic marathon Trials, to be held in Los Angeles in February 2016.

Puskedra_LukeRain-OlyTr12.jpgLuke Puskedra, 2012 U.S. Olympic Trials, 10,000 meters, photo by PhotoRun.net

Week 17, Day Seven, October 11, 2015, Sunday: Easy 7-11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are recovering from the racing.

Week 17: Time to start fine tuning!

The conference meets are on the way, and your fitness is coming along great. Racing fitness is key, and callousing yourself for racing is key. Watch how we change workouts on Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: Race Day 1

Here are three options for this day of the week:

1. Race Day

a. Warm up, with one to two miles, and some stride outs, 5k race, then, one of the following:

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Go to your conference meet course, warm up, run the course like this: run the first mile at race pace, jog half mile, run hard half mile, jog half mile, run last half mile of course hard, cooldown.

3. Warm up, 3 x mile @ 5k race pace, half mile jog, 4x200 meters on track, 90 percent effort, cooldown.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Race Day 2

1. Race Day, warm up well, some strideouts, 5k race, cool down a bit, then, one of the following:

a. Hill work, 1-mile warmup; 9 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start; repeat 8 times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds and then do your 1-mile easy cool-down.

2. Warm up, go to track, 12 times 400 meters at 5k race pace, 200 meter jog, finish with 4x 300 meters, at finish speed pace, cooldown.

3. Warm up, 3 miles on track, 200 meters, race pace, 200 meters moderate pace, repeat 12 times, cooldown.

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day 3

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, try one of the following:

1. Run the race course again, run three minutes hard, three minutes easy, three times, cooldown.

2. Run an easy four miles, then, go three hundred meters from finish, and practice, six times.

3. Run 5k course, first mile take easy, increase pace in second mile, run final mile at race pace, finish hard, cooldown.

Sunday: Easy 7-11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are recovering from the racing.

StartH_Chicago10.jpgThe Start of the Chicago Marathon, photo by PhotoRun.net

The Bank of America Chicago Marathon has been changed fundementally with their exclusion of pace makers. In truth, it should make for a more interesting race, and the athletes with the best tactics, and self control should be the winners.

David Monti wrote this piece for the subscribers of Race Results Weekly. We use this with permission.

Watch for our live coverage on RunBlogRun.com.LIVE tomorrow!

DSCN7108.JPGFamily Bank Half Marathon, photo from Kenyan Athlete

Some fast running in Eldoret, but as Justin Lagat writes, few will know as the race may have been 3 kilometers long!

Rotich_CarolineFV-Boston15.jpgCaroline Rotich, Boston 2015, photo by PhotoRun.net

Caroline Rotich won the 2015 Boston marathon in a rough and tumble battle over the last six miles. The very next day, Mizuno, her sponsor, renewed her contract, and did a congragulatory ad for her in key running magazines.

Caroline returns to Boston on Sunday, October 11, 2015. This time, Caroline Rotich will race the B.A.A. Half marathon!

Please enjoy this story of Chris Lotsbom, for Race Results Weekly, one of our partners. This article, we use with RRW's permission.

Korir_Wesley-Boston15.jpgWesley Korir, Boston 2015, photo by PhotoRun.net

Wesley Korir is the 2012 Boston Marathon Champion.

Wesley Korir is both father and husband.

Wesley Korir is a member of the Kenyan Parliament.

Wesley Korir is running better than he has in years.

Perhaps, because of his multi faceted life, Wes Korir has to get more out of his running, and he does. His comments to the media and then, in a short, personal interview, posted here, with me, focused on the ending of pace making in Chicago and the focus on cleaning up the sport, which he celebrates.

As Wesley Korir noted, he wins races with out pacemakers, because he knows how to actually race. Fascinating interview.

GirlsJuniorLead-USAxc15.jpgUSA Junior Women's cross country, February 2015, photo by PhotoRun.net

Cross country season is in full swing for US high schools, colleges and open runners. Over 750,000 runners will compete from September to February in the US season. The European season is just beginning, with their European champs (54 federations send teams!) in early December!

Week 17, Day Six, Saturday, October 10, 2015: Race Day 3

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, try one of the following:

1. Run the race course again, run three minutes hard, three minutes easy, three times, cooldown.

2. Run an easy four miles, then, go three hundred meters from finish, and practice, six times.

3. Run 5k course, first mile take easy, increase pace in second mile, run final mile at race pace, finish hard, cooldown.

Week 17: Time to start fine tuning!

The conference meets are on the way, and your fitness is coming along great. Racing fitness is key, and callousing yourself for racing is key. Watch how we change workouts on Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: Race Day 1

Here are three options for this day of the week:

1. Race Day

a. Warm up, with one to two miles, and some stride outs, 5k race, then, one of the following:

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Go to your conference meet course, warm up, run the course like this: run the first mile at race pace, jog half mile, run hard half mile, jog half mile, run last half mile of course hard, cooldown.

3. Warm up, 3 x mile @ 5k race pace, half mile jog, 4x200 meters on track, 90 percent effort, cooldown.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Race Day 2

1. Race Day, warm up well, some strideouts, 5k race, cool down a bit, then, one of the following:

a. Hill work, 1-mile warmup; 9 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start; repeat 8 times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds and then do your 1-mile easy cool-down.

2. Warm up, go to track, 12 times 400 meters at 5k race pace, 200 meter jog, finish with 4x 300 meters, at finish speed pace, cooldown.

3. Warm up, 3 miles on track, 200 meters, race pace, 200 meters moderate pace, repeat 12 times, cooldown.

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day 3

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, try one of the following:

1. Run the race course again, run three minutes hard, three minutes easy, three times, cooldown.

2. Run an easy four miles, then, go three hundred meters from finish, and practice, six times.

3. Run 5k course, first mile take easy, increase pace in second mile, run final mile at race pace, finish hard, cooldown.

Sunday: Easy 7-11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are recovering from the racing.

careyandjoan.jpgCarey Pinkowski and Joan Benoit Samuelson, photo by David Monti, RRW, used with permission.

Way back in 1977, in the predecessor of Outside magazine, Mariah, there existed a wonderfully thoughtful writer named John Jerome. He wrote a piece on Frank Shorter, who, after having won two Olympic medals, a gold and a silver, had brought much focus on the marathon distance in the U.S. Men and women were putting on their running shoes, buying copies of Runners World (went from 50,000 subscribers to 400,0000), and running one of the big city marathons (New York, Chicago, LA then).

In that article on Frank Shorter, the late John Jerome wrote one of the most prophetic lines about a marathoner ever: " In putting 26 miles together at five minutes per mile, Frank Shorter invented running." I always thought that Jerome had encapsulated the first running boom in that one sentance. I was, and am, so in awe of that line.

Now, move, dear readers, to the present. Joan Benoit Samuelson has been not only a beacon of running, but a beacon of promoting opportunities for women in sport and championing her sponsor, Nike, and its realization of the opportunities in athletics with women.

Joan Benoit Samuelson is celebrating her 30th anniversary of her epic victory in Chicago over Ingrid Kristiansen, in an American record that lasted 18 years. Joan Samuelson was not about fun running, nor was this about finishing. Joan Samuelson, on the shoulders of runners such as Nina Kusick, Jacqueline Hansen, Christi Vahlensheck and Lorraine Molller, built up the focus around women's marathoning. Samuelson raced hard, no quarter given, no quarter asked.

Joan Benoit stole the Los Angeles Olympic marathon, and while naysayers commented on TV, Joan won the first Olympic title. Her battle in 1985 against Kristiensen was a gut wrenching battle where two fine athletes red lined the pace for 21 plus miles before the Mainer stubborness of Joan Benoit Samuelson overcame the stoic Norgwegian Kristiansen.

Watching Joan now, I still see that stubbornness. I wonder how Scott, her husband, and a keen observer of this sport, has been able to help her focus her drive and energy.

Here is the piece by David Monti, written on Thursday for Race Results Weekly. We use this piece with permission.

Okay, let's get this straight.

I love the Bank of Chicago Marathon. I spent most of the 1990s and all of the 2000s coming to this race, and enjoying the best big city Marathon that the Midwest has to offer.

Under the watchful eyes of Carey Pinkowski, Mike Nishi and their team, the Bank of America Chicago marathon has become of the finest races in the world. There were many years, quite frankly, when the racing in the Windy City made this race the best race of my year.

Carey Pinkowski is the life long race director of the Bank of America Chicago Marathon. The guy has been here for nearly a nine hundred years (biblical reference), in reality, it just seems like that some days to the marathon staff.

In truth, Carey Pinkowski has been executive race director since 1990. That makes it twenty five years of managing one of the most important events each year on the City of Chicago calendar. With runners from fifty states and 100 countries, and three world records under his belt, Carey Pinkowski and his team have built the Bank of America Chicago marathon from a nice regional event with some global potential to one of the six most important marathons in the world, each and every year.

Pinkowski_Cary2-WorldMM06.jpgCarey Pinkowski, without a hat, photo by PhotoRun.net

Today, at the press conference, Joan Benoit Samuelson, on the thirtieth anniversary of her victory at the 1985 Chicago marathon, did all that she could to run this iconic marathon through the Windy City this year. In her comments before the media this morning, Joan Benoit Samuelson comes across as what she is: a thoughtful pioneer in the women's running movement, who speaks with her movement and her words.

Samuelson-Keflezighi1-Falmouth14.jpgJoan Benoit Samuelson with Meb Keflezighi, Falmouth 2014, photo by PhotoRun.net

After watching Joan this morning, and then, noting her busy schedule with sponsors over the next couple of days, I thought I would remind us of how Joan Benoit Samuelson reinvented running.

Thumbnail image for Huddle_Molly1-BAA5k15.JPGMolly Huddle, photo by PhotoRun.net

Molly Huddle is a perfect example of the type of athlete that succeeds in the American system. A fine high school runner (check out her best two mile), then, a strong career at Notre Dame, and nearly a decade as one of the top women runners in the U.S.

Cross country was a important part of her development. Since her fourth place in Beijing 10,000 meters, in August, Molly has won the US 20k, the US 5k, the US 10 mile and she is racing the Tufts 10k on Monday, October 12.

Week 17, Day Five, October 9, 2015, Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Week 17: Time to start fine tuning!

The conference meets are on the way, and your fitness is coming along great. Racing fitness is key, and callousing yourself for racing is key. Watch how we change workouts on Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: Race Day 1

Here are three options for this day of the week:

1. Race Day

a. Warm up, with one to two miles, and some stride outs, 5k race, then, one of the following:

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Go to your conference meet course, warm up, run the course like this: run the first mile at race pace, jog half mile, run hard half mile, jog half mile, run last half mile of course hard, cooldown.

3. Warm up, 3 x mile @ 5k race pace, half mile jog, 4x200 meters on track, 90 percent effort, cooldown.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Race Day 2

1. Race Day, warm up well, some strideouts, 5k race, cool down a bit, then, one of the following:

a. Hill work, 1-mile warmup; 9 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start; repeat 8 times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds and then do your 1-mile easy cool-down.

2. Warm up, go to track, 12 times 400 meters at 5k race pace, 200 meter jog, finish with 4x 300 meters, at finish speed pace, cooldown.

3. Warm up, 3 miles on track, 200 meters, race pace, 200 meters moderate pace, repeat 12 times, cooldown.

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day 3

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, try one of the following:

1. Run the race course again, run three minutes hard, three minutes easy, three times, cooldown.

2. Run an easy four miles, then, go three hundred meters from finish, and practice, six times.

3. Run 5k course, first mile take easy, increase pace in second mile, run final mile at race pace, finish hard, cooldown.

Sunday: Easy 7-11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are recovering from the racing.

Merritt_AriesQ-LondonDL15.jpg

Aries Merritt, London DL, 2015, photo by PhotoRun.net

Aries Merritt won the Olympic medal in 2012, and at the very end of that season, broke the world record. I remember asking him about the World Record, and he talked about rthym and how fast the race went.

In May 2013, thanks to the IAAF, I was part of a group of global media who observed Aries Merritt, Ashton Eaton and Brianne Theisen-Eaton, and Mo Farah, Galen Rupp, Cam Levins and Matt Centrowitz training for about a week.

Aries had a rough 2013 and 2014.

In mid-2015, Aries suggested that there might be a reason for his two years of challenges. It was his kidneys.

I believe that his bronze medal in the 110m hurdles in the World Championships may be one of the most amazing athletic performances of all times. Three days later, Aries Merritt had a kidney transplant.

This is the story of his recovery, by David Hunter, who has followed Aries this spring and summer.

True_Ben2-Mile2-FootLocker03.jpgBen True (this is from 2003 FootLocker), photo by PhotoRun.net

Ben True, the first American to win a DL 5000 meter race, is shown above running cross country in high school. In college, Ben True competed in both cross country running and cross country skiing!

Week 17, Day 4, October 8, 2015, Thursday: Race Day 2

1. Race Day, warm up well, some strideouts, 5k race, cool down a bit, then, one of the following:

a. Hill work, 1-mile warmup; 9 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start; repeat 8 times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds and then do your 1-mile easy cool-down.

2. Warm up, go to track, 12 times 400 meters at 5k race pace, 200 meter jog, finish with 4x 300 meters, at finish speed pace, cooldown.

3. Warm up, 3 miles on track, 200 meters, race pace, 200 meters moderate pace, repeat 12 times, cooldown.

Week 17: Time to start fine tuning!

The conference meets are on the way, and your fitness is coming along great. Racing fitness is key, and callousing yourself for racing is key. Watch how we change workouts on Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: Race Day 1

Here are three options for this day of the week:

1. Race Day

a. Warm up, with one to two miles, and some stride outs, 5k race, then, one of the following:

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Go to your conference meet course, warm up, run the course like this: run the first mile at race pace, jog half mile, run hard half mile, jog half mile, run last half mile of course hard, cooldown.

3. Warm up, 3 x mile @ 5k race pace, half mile jog, 4x200 meters on track, 90 percent effort, cooldown.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Race Day 2

1. Race Day, warm up well, some strideouts, 5k race, cool down a bit, then, one of the following:

a. Hill work, 1-mile warmup; 9 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start; repeat 8 times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds and then do your 1-mile easy cool-down.

2. Warm up, go to track, 12 times 400 meters at 5k race pace, 200 meter jog, finish with 4x 300 meters, at finish speed pace, cooldown.

3. Warm up, 3 miles on track, 200 meters, race pace, 200 meters moderate pace, repeat 12 times, cooldown.

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day 3

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, try one of the following:

1. Run the race course again, run three minutes hard, three minutes easy, three times, cooldown.

2. Run an easy four miles, then, go three hundred meters from finish, and practice, six times.

3. Run 5k course, first mile take easy, increase pace in second mile, run final mile at race pace, finish hard, cooldown.

Sunday: Easy 7-11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are recovering from the racing.

Miki Gorman was one of the first women marathoners that I knew about.

We would read about her exploits in the pages of Runners'World and then, The Runner.

Miki won the Boston in 1977, New York in 1976 and 1977. She was the pocket rocket of the first marathon movement including women.

Roger Robinson's thoughtful tribute (please read below) gives a glimpse of how impressive Miki Gorman was: a tiny women, she was powerful and fast.

A women's marathon pioneer? Quite simply, yes.

And as Roger noted so well, if the women's marathon had been held in 1976, Miki Gorman would have been an odds on favorite for a medal.

Please keep Miki Gorman, who died at the age of 80 on September 19, in your thoughts and prayers.

BoysMidwestStart-FootLocker14.JPGA season of training comes down to sixteen minutes or less, photo by PhotoRun.net

Week 17, Day 3: Wednesday, October 7, 2015: Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Week 17: Time to start fine tuning!

The conference meets are on the way, and your fitness is coming along great. Racing fitness is key, and callousing yourself for racing is key. Watch how we change workouts on Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: Race Day 1

Here are three options for this day of the week:

1. Race Day

a. Warm up, with one to two miles, and some stride outs, 5k race, then, one of the following:

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Go to your conference meet course, warm up, run the course like this: run the first mile at race pace, jog half mile, run hard half mile, jog half mile, run last half mile of course hard, cooldown.

3. Warm up, 3 x mile @ 5k race pace, half mile jog, 4x200 meters on track, 90 percent effort, cooldown.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Race Day 2

1. Race Day, warm up well, some strideouts, 5k race, cool down a bit, then, one of the following:

a. Hill work, 1-mile warmup; 9 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start; repeat 8 times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds and then do your 1-mile easy cool-down.

2. Warm up, go to track, 12 times 400 meters at 5k race pace, 200 meter jog, finish with 4x 300 meters, at finish speed pace, cooldown.

3. Warm up, 3 miles on track, 200 meters, race pace, 200 meters moderate pace, repeat 12 times, cooldown.

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day 3

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, try one of the following:

1. Run the race course again, run three minutes hard, three minutes easy, three times, cooldown.

2. Run an easy four miles, then, go three hundred meters from finish, and practice, six times.

3. Run 5k course, first mile take easy, increase pace in second mile, run final mile at race pace, finish hard, cooldown.

Sunday: Easy 7-11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are recovering from the racing.

Mary Cain had a tough year in 2015, after superb years in 2013 and 2014.

On her official blog, RunMaryCain.com, we found this note from today about the changes that she has made in her life: living back on the East Coast. Mary Cain is still being coached by Alberto Salazar and is part of the Oregon Project.

At her level, even as fast as she is, she is still a teenager. The pressure from social media has to be tremendous.

We wish Mary Cain a productive fall at Fordham University (a fine Jesuit institution), and we hope the training goes well and we see her return to form in 2016!

Reiser_JesseFH-FLfinals14.JPgRun through the finish, photo by PhotoRun.net

Week 17: Time to start fine tuning!

The conference meets are on the way, and your fitness is coming along great. Racing fitness is key, and callousing yourself for racing is key. Watch how we change workouts on Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: Race Day 1

Here are three options for this day of the week:

1. Race Day

a. Warm up, with one to two miles, and some stride outs, 5k race, then, one of the following:

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Go to your conference meet course, warm up, run the course like this: run the first mile at race pace, jog half mile, run hard half mile, jog half mile, run last half mile of course hard, cooldown.

3. Warm up, 3 x mile @ 5k race pace, half mile jog, 4x200 meters on track, 90 percent effort, cooldown.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Race Day 2

1. Race Day, warm up well, some strideouts, 5k race, cool down a bit, then, one of the following:

a. Hill work, 1-mile warmup; 9 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start; repeat 8 times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds and then do your 1-mile easy cool-down.

2. Warm up, go to track, 12 times 400 meters at 5k race pace, 200 meter jog, finish with 4x 300 meters, at finish speed pace, cooldown.

3. Warm up, 3 miles on track, 200 meters, race pace, 200 meters moderate pace, repeat 12 times, cooldown.

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day 3

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, try one of the following:

1. Run the race course again, run three minutes hard, three minutes easy, three times, cooldown.

2. Run an easy four miles, then, go three hundred meters from finish, and practice, six times.

3. Run 5k course, first mile take easy, increase pace in second mile, run final mile at race pace, finish hard, cooldown.

Sunday: Easy 7-11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are recovering from the racing.

Daniel Boone HS girls team before their Local Event.JPGDaniel Boone High School Girls team just before HOKA ONE ONE Postal Competition (Sept 5, Gray, TN)

Daniel Boone HS Coach Len Jeffers.JPGDaniel Boone HS Coach Len Jeffers (Gray, TN)

The postal competition was one of my favorite events each year in high school. I remember reading about the winners each year in the mid 1970s. The simplicity of the two mile run, eight laps on the track, when one is very fit and ready to race.

HOKA ONE ONE has brought this event back to our sport. I encourage all high school coaches into considering adding this event into their season. A two mile a couple of weeks before the championships would be a great addition to the season.

Or, at the end of your season, let er rip.

Frisbie_AnnieFH-FootLocker14.JPGIt is all about the finish, photo by PhotoRun.net

Week 17: Time to start fine tuning!

The conference meets are on the way, and your fitness is coming along great. Racing fitness is key, and callousing yourself for racing is key. Watch how we change workouts on Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: Race Day 1

Here are three options for this day of the week:

1. Race Day

a. Warm up, with one to two miles, and some stride outs, 5k race, then, one of the following:

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Go to your conference meet course, warm up, run the course like this: run the first mile at race pace, jog half mile, run hard half mile, jog half mile, run last half mile of course hard, cooldown.

3. Warm up, 3 x mile @ 5k race pace, half mile jog, 4x200 meters on track, 90 percent effort, cooldown.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Race Day 2

1. Race Day, warm up well, some strideouts, 5k race, cool down a bit, then, one of the following:

a. Hill work, 1-mile warmup; 9 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start; repeat 8 times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds and then do your 1-mile easy cool-down.

2. Warm up, go to track, 12 times 400 meters at 5k race pace, 200 meter jog, finish with 4x 300 meters, at finish speed pace, cooldown.

3. Warm up, 3 miles on track, 200 meters, race pace, 200 meters moderate pace, repeat 12 times, cooldown.

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day 3

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, try one of the following:

1. Run the race course again, run three minutes hard, three minutes easy, three times, cooldown.

2. Run an easy four miles, then, go three hundred meters from finish, and practice, six times.

3. Run 5k course, first mile take easy, increase pace in second mile, run final mile at race pace, finish hard, cooldown.

Sunday: Easy 7-11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are recovering from the racing.

NagaiStadium-Osaka07.jpgOsaka, 2007, photo by PhotoRun.net

TrackStats is one of the most reliable and classic newsletters in our sport. Their new analysis of all medals in World Champs from 1983-2015 is fascinating!

Huddle_Molly-BAA5k15.JPGMolly Huddle, photo by PhotoRun.net

Molly Huddle has been on a roll this Fall. Winning the US 20k in New Haven (Sept. 7), then, the USA 5k in Providence (Sept. 21), and now the USA 10 mile title.

Sam Chelanga wins his first title after gaining US citizenship, with a very close finish.

Molly's next race is the Tuft's 10k on October 11.

The NCAA Cross Country season is one of my favorite parts of the year. Who will win the NCAA Div 1, 2 or 3? Who will win the conferences?

This piece will get the conversation going....

2k-NCAAXC03.jpgNCAA, photo by PhotoRun.net

Inside the Games is one of the most important sources on the global sports movement. It should be read every day.

This piece on the Canadian Olympic President is a developing story.

More to come.

2015-USATFoutdoors-men-5000m.jpgUSATF Men's 5000m champs, June 2015, fifty meters to go! photo by Brian Eder/RunBlogRun

Week Sixteen, Day Seven, October 4, 2015, Sunday: Easy 7-10-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are switching over to racing.

Week 16: Racing Season is here!

For most, two more weeks and conference meets are upon us. Your racing continues, two to three times a week for another two weeks. Use those days to learn, and try something different on each race and also focus on team racing.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: Race Day 1

Here are three options for this day of the week:

1. Race Day

a. Warm up, with one to two miles, and some stride outs, 5k race, then, one of the following:

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Repetitions: after race, four times five minutes at 5k race pace, with easy five minutes recovery in between, long cooldown, 2-3 miles

3. Twelve laps on 400 meter track, sprinting straights, jogging turns, straights at mile pace of current 5k racing.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Race Day 2

1. Race Day, warm up well, some strideouts, 5k race, cool down a bit, then, one of the following:

a. Hill work, 1-mile warmup; 9 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start; repeat 8 times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds and then do your 1-mile easy cool-down.

2. Five times 3:00, at mile pace for 5k, with two minute jog in between, then cooldown

3. Repetitions: Three times six minutes, at 5k race pace, six minutes easy jogging in between, then cooldown

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day 3

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, try one of the following:

1. 6 x 300 meters, with each one faster than one before, then cooldown

2. 4 x 3 minutes at 5k race pace, with three minutes easy, then cooldown

3. 5k course loop, sprint 100 meters, jog 100 meters, do that the entire course, then, cooldown

Sunday: Easy 7-10-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are switching over to racing.

AOFall.jpgFlanagan, Infeld, Huddle, moments after WC 10,000m finish, design by Alex Larsen, photo by PhotoRun.net

The women's 10,000 meters was a true championship race. The quality of the field was tremendous and the fact that three USA women were in the hunt had me riveted to the track. Out of the corner of my eye, I noticed someone flying around the track, as I spent much of my time watching Molly Huddle.

In that moment, in the 4,999th meter, Molly Huddle faltered, and Emily Infeld, as she had practiced most of the summer, after being chided by Shalane Flanagan, ran through the finish. The picture above captures the pathos of the event.

Three classy athletes battling for a medal and one gets it.

I had known of Emily Infeld for some time. That Jerry Schumacher was coaching her was all that I needed to follow her: Jerry is a litmus test for finding great talent. His athletes love him, and respect him, and give him their all.

This is the story of many things, quite frankly.

But, I will let Cathal Dennehy tell the rest of the story...

Hacker_OlinFH-FLfinal14.jpgTim Hacker, FootLocker XC 2014, photo by PhotoRun.net

Racing makes you a better race. For your cross country season, start to focus on key races. One strong race effort a week is important now. Use the others to make yourself a better racer and more efficient part of your team.

Week 16, Day Six, October 3, 2015, Saturday: Race Day 3

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, try one of the following:

1. 6 x 300 meters, with each one faster than one before, then cooldown

2. 4 x 3 minutes at 5k race pace, with three minutes easy, then cooldown

3. 5k course loop, sprint 100 meters, jog 100 meters, do that the entire course, then, cooldown

Week 16: Racing Season is here!

For most, two more weeks and conference meets are upon us. Your racing continues, two to three times a week for another two weeks. Use those days to learn, and try something different on each race and also focus on team racing.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: Race Day 1

Here are three options for this day of the week:

1. Race Day

a. Warm up, with one to two miles, and some stride outs, 5k race, then, one of the following:

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Repetitions: after race, four times five minutes at 5k race pace, with easy five minutes recovery in between, long cooldown, 2-3 miles

3. Twelve laps on 400 meter track, sprinting straights, jogging turns, straights at mile pace of current 5k racing.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Race Day 2

1. Race Day, warm up well, some strideouts, 5k race, cool down a bit, then, one of the following:

a. Hill work, 1-mile warmup; 9 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start; repeat 8 times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds and then do your 1-mile easy cool-down.

2. Five times 3:00, at mile pace for 5k, with two minute jog in between, then cooldown

3. Repetitions: Three times six minutes, at 5k race pace, six minutes easy jogging in between, then cooldown

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day 3

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, try one of the following:

1. 6 x 300 meters, with each one faster than one before, then cooldown

2. 4 x 3 minutes at 5k race pace, with three minutes easy, then cooldown

3. 5k course loop, sprint 100 meters, jog 100 meters, do that the entire course, then, cooldown

Sunday: Easy 7-10-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are switching over to racing.

Kipchoge-Mutai-LilesaH-Berlin15.JPGKipchoge, Mutai, Lelisa, photo by PhotoRun.net

Week 16, Day 5, October 2, 2015, Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Week 16: Racing Season is here!

For most, two more weeks and conference meets are upon us. Your racing continues, two to three times a week for another two weeks. Use those days to learn, and try something different on each race and also focus on team racing.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: Race Day 1

Here are three options for this day of the week:

1. Race Day

a. Warm up, with one to two miles, and some stride outs, 5k race, then, one of the following:

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Repetitions: after race, four times five minutes at 5k race pace, with easy five minutes recovery in between, long cooldown, 2-3 miles

3. Twelve laps on 400 meter track, sprinting straights, jogging turns, straights at mile pace of current 5k racing.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Race Day 2

1. Race Day, warm up well, some strideouts, 5k race, cool down a bit, then, one of the following:

a. Hill work, 1-mile warmup; 9 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start; repeat 8 times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds and then do your 1-mile easy cool-down.

2. Five times 3:00, at mile pace for 5k, with two minute jog in between, then cooldown

3. Repetitions: Three times six minutes, at 5k race pace, six minutes easy jogging in between, then cooldown

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day 3

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, try one of the following:

1. 6 x 300 meters, with each one faster than one before, then cooldown

2. 4 x 3 minutes at 5k race pace, with three minutes easy, then cooldown

3. 5k course loop, sprint 100 meters, jog 100 meters, do that the entire course, then, cooldown

Sunday: Easy 7-10-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are switching over to racing.

Sanders15159_2-98.jpgKimpton Hotels, courtesy of Kimpton

Kimpton Hotels is a collective of 60 boutique hotels and 70 restaurants and bars across the U.S. The hotels and restaurants provide the traveler a chance to experience the local cultures and community. We noticed the following press release on the Kimpton hotels in NYC's program with the Mile High Run Club. A great idea to combines a nice weekend of fun in the Big Apple, workouts over two days and some fun meals and perhaps, cocktails, in a very cool bar, as well as two nights in the unique hotels that are the Kimpton Hotel group!

Write us and tell us what you think of this program at runblogrun@gmail.com.

Jager_Evan1a-Paris15.JPGEvan Jager, photo by PhotoRun.net

Evan Jager had a tumultuous year in 2015.

Moments of clarity, moments of frustration, moments of grandeur. We asked Cathal Dennehy to catch up with America's finest steeple chaser. For Evan, there is now time for rest, then, the long build up, observed by his coach, Jerry Schumacher and their team, as Mr. Jager builds for Rio de Janeiro.

Keflezighi_Meb1-SanJose15.JpgMeb Keflezighi en route to Masters AR at 20k and 1/2 marathon, photo by PhotoRun.net

Week 16, Day Four, October 1, 2015, Thursday: Race Day 2

1. Race Day, warm up well, some strideouts, 5k race, cool down a bit, then, one of the following:

a. Hill work, 1-mile warmup; 9 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start; repeat 8 times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds and then do your 1-mile easy cool-down.

2. Five times 3:00, at mile pace for 5k, with two minute jog in between, then cooldown

3. Repetiions: Three times six minutes, at 5k race pace, six minutes easy jogging in between, then cooldown

Week 16: Racing Season is here!

For most, two more weeks and conference meets are upon us. Your racing continues, two to three times a week for another two weeks. Use those days to learn, and try something different on each race and also focus on team racing.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: Race Day 1

Here are three options for this day of the week:

1. Race Day

a. Warm up, with one to two miles, and some stride outs, 5k race, then, one of the following:

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Repetions: after race, four times five minutes at 5k race pace, with easy five minutes recovery in between, long cooldown, 2-3 miles

3. Twelve laps on 400 meter track, sprinting straights, jogging turns, straights at mile pace of current 5k racing.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Race Day 2

1. Race Day, warm up well, some strideouts, 5k race, cool down a bit, then, one of the following:

a. Hill work, 1-mile warmup; 9 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start; repeat 8 times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds and then do your 1-mile easy cool-down.

2. Five times 3:00, at mile pace for 5k, with two minute jog in between, then cooldown

3. Repetiions: Three times six minutes, at 5k race pace, six minutes easy jogging in between, then cooldown

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day 3

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, try one of the following:

1. 6 x 300 meters, with each one faster than one before, then cooldown

2. 4 x 3 minutes at 5k race pace, with three minutes easy, then cooldown

3. 5k course loop, sprint 100 meters, jog 100 meters, do that the entire course, then, cooldown

Sunday: Easy 7-10-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are switching over to racing.

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