November 2015 Archives

IMG_0013.JPGUpdated November 30, 2016

The following twenty or so videos and playlists are a the work of the Shoe Addicts, the digital partners of Fortius Media and the Running Network. The Shoe Addicts consist of Algeron Felice, Mike Deering and Adam Johnson-Eder.

Through their eyes, you will see some of the most vital product in our business, but most importantly, some of the most important and passionate humans involved in any pursuit.

I was reminded of this while I was watching Scott Stratten today speak about Marketing against the Big Boxes. Scott was right. Hire people with passion for running, you can teach all of the rest!

The Shoe Addicts will be in Austin all week. And they will be chronicling the business of running for upcoming projects. If you need to reach out to them, email adamlawrenceeder@gmail.com.

BoysStart-FLSouth15.JPgFootLocker South, Nov 2015, photo by PhotoRun.net

A great weekend of racing over the weekend.

In the next two weeks, we will provide some options, one for those running NXN and one for those running FootLocker. If you have specific questions, I would suggest an email to runblogrun@gmail.com and I will be happy to work out specifics.

Key to remember is this: In last six to ten days before major races, you can get injured, you can overtrain or you can be smart, taper and do just the work needed to hone your racing.

Week 25, Day One, November 30, 2015

An easy warm up, then, 4-5 miles and six 150 stride outs. Cooldown and change into dry clothes.

Meb Keflezighi has used UCAN since before the product that changed his sports nutrition for the better had a name. Ritz, aka Dathan Ritzenhein, is a new member of the UCAN team. But, as an athlete looking to make his fourth Olympic team, Dathan realizes that nutrition plays a major role.

The crowd at the Marriott Marquis on October 31, 2015 was the largest that this writer has seen at a UCAN conference. Meb and Dathan provided the star power, but the UCAN product is convincing many athletes, elite and citizen runners, that UCAN should be part of the sports nutritional arsenal as they train towards their running goals.

After watching the video from our partners, The Shoe Addicts, please feel free to learn more on UCAN at https://www.generationucan.com/home.html

Affolder_NoahFH-FLneXC15.JPGNoah Affolder wins FL NE, 11/28/15, photo by PhotoRun.net

Davison_MadeleineFH-FLneXC15.JPGMadeleine Davison, FL NE, 11/28/15, photo by PhotoRun.net

The NorthEast regional of the FootLocker was highly competitive on both the boys and girls divisions. Making the top seven means that any high school runner from a school big or small can compete with the very best cross country runners in the country.

Hunter_Andrew-FLSouth15.JPg

Andrew Hunter breaking CR for FL South, photo by PhotoRun.net

Kelati_WeiniFH-FLSouth15.JPgWeini Kilati wins FL South, photo by PhotoRun.net

The FootLocker South Regional is one of the fastest courses in the country. Andrew Hunter broke the 2012 course record by two seconds with his very fast 14:26. Weini Kilati, a two time FL finalist, won the women's race in 16:43, winning by twenty-five seconds!


*** MEDIA ALERT ***
Weini Kelati and Andrew Hunter Capture First Place Titles in 37th Annual Foot Locker Cross Country Championships South Regional
Hunter breaks course record
RACE HIGHLIGHTS:
Weini Kelati of Leesburg, Va., and Andrew Hunter of Purcellville, Va., won the Foot Locker Cross Country Championships (FLCCC) South Regional today. Kelati, a junior, claimed the title in the girls' seeded race in 16:43. Nevada Mareno, a junior from Leesville, N.C., finished second in 17:05, and Libby Davidson of Lynchburg, Va., placed third in 17:14. Both Kelati and Davidson are two-time FLCCC National Finalists.
Reigning South Regional Champion Andrew Hunter, a senior at Loudoun Valley High School, breaks the course record and captures the title in 14:26. The previous course record of 14:28was held by Sean McGorty (2012). Gannon Willcutts of Crozet, Va., placed second in 14:59, and Jonathan Lomogda of Virginia Beach, Va., finished third in 14:59. Hunter, Willcutts and Steven Cross of Merritt Island, Fla. (10th place), are two-time FLCCC National Finalists.
WHEN/WHERE:
Saturday, Nov. 28, 2015
McAlpine Greenway Park in Charlotte, N.C.
COURSE/WEATHER:
5,000-meter course; good race conditions; clear skies; 57 degrees
NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS:
The top 10 boys and the top 10 girls in today's seeded races qualified to compete against runners from the Northeast, Midwest, and West Regional meets in the Foot Locker Cross Country Championships National Finals, on Saturday, Dec. 12 at Morley Field, Balboa Park in San Diego, Calif.
CONTACTS:
(see attached chart for race results)

2015 Foot Locker Cross Country Championships - South Regional Results
McAlpine Creek Park - Charlotte, N.C.
Boys
Place Name Hometown High School Time
1) Andrew (Drew) Hunter Purcellville, Va. Loudoun Valley High School (12) 14:26
2) Gannon Willcutts Crozet, Va. Western Albemarle High School (12) 14:59
3) Jonathan Lomogda Virginia Beach, Va. Cox High School (12) 14:59
4) Reed Brown Grapevine, Texas Carroll Senior High School (11) 15:04
5) Luke Meade Bluff City, Tenn. Sullivan East High School (12) 15:07
6) Waleed Suliman Henrico, Va. Douglas S. Freeman High School (11) 15:10
7) Cole Dowdy Crestwood, Ky. South Oldham High School (12) 15:16
8) Joshua Jacques Casselberry, Florida Lyman High School (12) 15:21
9) Micah Pratt Lynchburg, Va. Homeschool (11) 15:23
10) Steven Cross Merritt Island, Fla. Merritt Island High School (12) 15:24
Girls
Place Name Hometown High School Time
1) Weini Kelati Leesburg, Va. Heritage High School (11) 16:43
2) Nevada Mareno Leesville, N.C. Leesville Road High School (11) 17:05
3) Libby Davidson Lynchburg, Va. E.C. Glass High School (11) 17:14
4) Lindsay Billings John's Creek, Ga. Northview High School (12) 17:15
5) Julia Heymach Houston, Texas M.B. Lamar High School (11) 17:19
6) Abby Gray San Antonio, Texas Alamo Heights High School (12) 17:19
7) Emma Grace Hurley Roswell, Ga. Fellowship Christian School (12) 17:23
8) Savannah Carnahan Sawanee, Ga. South Forsyth High School (12) 17:34
9) Logan Morris Inman, S.C. Spartanburg Christian Academy (12) 17:35
10) Anna Vess Fairview, N.C. A.C. Reynolds High School (12) 17:40

*Race photos and video highlights are available by request or online at www.footlockercc.com
Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram / #FLCCC, #South

Davis_JonathanFH1-FLmwXC15.jpgJonathan Davis, photo by PhotoRun.net

Werner_TaylorFH-FLmwXC15.jpgTaylor Werner wins FL MW, 11/28/15, photo by PhotoRun.net

The FootLocker Midwest is one of the largest FL regional events. The crowd that arrives at the iconic UW-Parkside course has included some of the finest distance runners in American distance running. The finals are December 12, 2015 in the historic Balboa Park, the home of the FootLocker for many years.


*** MEDIA ALERT ***
Taylor Werner and Jonathan Davis Capture First Place Titles in 37th Annual Foot Locker Cross Country Championships Midwest Regional
RACE HIGHLIGHTS:
Taylor Werner of Bloomsdale, Mo., and Jonathan Davis of Oakwood, Ill., won the Foot Locker Cross Country Championships (FLCCC) Midwest Regional today. In the girls' race, Werner, claimed the title in 16:58. Judy Pendergast of Naperville, Ill., placed second in 17:19, and Maryjeanne Gilbert of Peoria, Ill., placed third in 17:24. Werner, Gilbert and Lauren Gregory (8th place) of Fort Collins, Colo., are two-time FLCCC National Finalists. Stephanie Jenks (10th place) of Aurora, Iowa, is a three-time FLCCC National Finalist.
In the boys' race, Jonathan Davis of Oakwood, Ill., captured the title in14:57. Paul Roberts of Boulder, Colo., placed second in 14:58, with Ben Veatch of Carmel, Ind., finishing third in 14:58. Davis and Veatch are two-time FLCCC national finalists.

WHEN/WHERE:
Saturday, Nov. 28, 2015
UW-Parkside in Kenosha, Wis.

COURSE/WEATHER:
5,000-meter course; muddy conditions; cloudy skies; 32 degrees
NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS:
The top 10 boys and the top 10 girls in today's seeded races qualified to compete against runners from the Northeast, South, and West Regional meets in the Foot Locker Cross Country Championships National Finals, on Saturday, Dec. 12 at Morley Field, Balboa Park in San Diego, Calif.
(see attached chart for race results)

2015 Foot Locker Cross Country Championships - Midwest Regional Results
University of Wisconsin - Kenosha, Wis.
Boys
Place Name Hometown High School Time
1) Jonathan Davis Oakwood, Ill. Oakwood High School (12) 14:57
2) Paul Roberts Boulder, Colo. Lyons High School (12) 14:58
3) Ben Veatch Carmel, Ind. Carmel High School (12) 14:58
4) Andrew Jordan Pataskala, Ohio Watkins Memorial High School (12) 15:00
5) Brayden Law Fort Wayne, Ind. Homestead High School (12) 15:04
6) Seth Hirsch Omaha, Neb. Millard West High School (11) 15:12
7) Matthew Pereira Kildeer, Ill. Lake Zurich High School (11) 15:14
8) Finn Gessner Madison, Wisc. La Follette High School (11) 15:18
9) Isaac Harding Grand Rapids, Mich. Rockford High School (12) 15:19
10) Christian Noble Greenfield, Ind. Mt. Vernon High School (12) 15:21
Girls
Place Name Hometown High School Time
1) Taylor Werner Bloomsdale, Mo. Ste. Genevieve High School (12) 16:58
2) Judy Pendergast Naperville, Ill. Naperville North High School (12) 17:19
3) Maryjeanne Gilbert Peoria, Ill. Peoria Notre Dame High School (12) 17:24
4) Lauren Johnson West Lafayette, Ind. West Lafayette High School (12) 17:30
5) Sarah Leinheiser Carmel, Ind. Carmel High School (11) 17:31
6) Madison Troy Grandville, Mich. Grandville High School (10) 17:32
7) Aubrey Roberts Eau Claire, Wis. Eau Claire Memorial High School (12) 17:42
8) Lauren Gregory Fort Collins, Colo. Fort Collins High School (11) 17:43
9) Emma Wilson Washington, Mich. Romeo High School (12) 17:45
10) Stephanie Jenks Aurora, Iowa Linn-Mar High School (12) 17:50
*Race photos and video highlights are available by request or online at www.footlockercc.com
Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram / #FLCCC, #South

151111 Cover WGiA_NEW_frontpage_HR.jpgThe new book above, is being published as you read this, and will be available in Sweden next week. If you order before December 11, the publisher can get the book to you in North America by the Christmas holiday.

We have the info on the book, a sample spread, a pdf flyer and how to order all below!

We asked Carles Baronet, from Track in Sun, to provide a monthly column, en español: El declive del 1.500 en el atletismo español.

cacho.jpgFermin Cacho, Barcelona 1992, photo: Historiasblog

Here is the just released schedule for the 2016 U.S. Olympic Track & Field Trials, to be held, July 1-10, 2016 in Eugene, Oregon.

The Olympic Trials is one of the most amazing nine or this time, ten days of athletics in the world! If you can get there, find a way, it is a great time with twenty thousand of your closest friends!

TrackTown-USout15.jpgTracktown USA, photo by PhotoRun.net

nikeflagsnxn13.jpgNike NXN, photo by Larry Eder

On Saturday, November 28, there are several FootLocker Regionals and several NXN regionals. There is also the CIF State Cross Country Champs in California. It will be one of the largest days of participation in cross country of the year.

This is the big day for many.

Week 24, Day Six, November 28, 2015

We suggest that you warm up as you have all season, one to two miles of easy running, perhaps a couple of stride outs.

In the larger races, he or she who keeps their head does the best. Get out and get yourself on good footing and start passing one runner at a time. As you get near the finish, try to save something for the last 150 meters, and see what you can do!

Good luck!

Here is the link to your 23 previous weeks of training: http://www.runblogrun.com/2015/11/2015-runblogrun-fall-cross-country-challenge-week-23-day-seven-by-larry-eder.html

Seb Coe made the right decision on Thursday to relinquish his Nike Ambassador role. In doing so, the new President showed that he can put the sport infront of his personal needs. More symbolic than anything else, Seb Coe is showing that he must be above all reproach as he reacts to upcoming IAAF allegations and works to rebuild the reputation of the sport.

Hightower-Fredericks-Coe-IAAFpc15.jpgStephanie Hightower, Frankie Fredericks, Seb Coe, photo by PhotoRun.net

Some will be interested to know that Coe's announcement of ending his relationship with Nike as an ambassador was the largest tweet on @runblogrun's twitter feed in past week. In fact, it was double of any other tweet for the week.

Hightower-Coe-Fredericks1-IAAFpc15.jpgStephanie Hightower, Sebastian Coe, Frankie Fredericks, photo by PhotoRun.net

Much went on November 26 in Monaco. Here is the compiled report from our friends at EME News. Note that their sources are noted in notes plus IAAF and our friends at L'Equipe.

Rohrer_Anna1a-FLmwXC14.jpgFootLocker 2014 Midwest, photo by PhotoRun.net

Week 24, Day Five, November 27, 2015:

Today is the day before the big race. You might want to walk the course today, and then, jog a couple of miles.

Get some rest, eat well, and just remind yourself that all of the last six months of training have taken you to his moment. Watch a Netflix movie, or read a book, try and relax a bit. Just don't go and walk around a mall the day before the race!

Here is the link to your 23 previous weeks of training: http://www.runblogrun.com/2015/11/2015-runblogrun-fall-cross-country-challenge-week-23-day-seven-by-larry-eder.html

XC2_2350.jpgNCAA XC Division 1, photo by Kyle Terwillegar/USTFCCCA

Molly Seidel won the NCAA Divison 1 XC Champs on Saturday, November 21, 2015. In winning the NCAA Cross Country, Molly become the first girl FootLocker champion to win the NCAA as well!

Follow your Dreams! Happy Thanksgiving!

Week 24, Day Four, November 26, 2015:

Happy Thanksgiving! Either jog an easy three miles, take it off, or run a Turkey Trot, as long as you jog it. Save those legs for your race on Saturday.

Here is the link to your 23 previous weeks of training:http://www.runblogrun.com/2015/11/2015-runblogrun-fall-cross-country-challenge-week-23-day-seven-by-larry-eder.html

DSCN7740.JPGBethwell Birgin, photo by www.Kenyanathlete.com

Justin Lagat caught up with Bethwell Birgin at the Pace Management training camp. Just over injuries, Bethwell is training with his focus on the 2016 Olympics.

XC2_2889.jpgNCAA XC Division 1, photo by Kyle Terwillegar

Week 24, Day Three, November 25, 2015:

This is a holiday week. If you are running NXN Regionals or FootLocker Regionals, then take it easy today.

Either take the day off or jog an easy two or three miles, and stretch a little bit.

Here is the link to your 23 previous weeks of training:http://www.runblogrun.com/2015/11/2015-runblogrun-fall-cross-country-challenge-week-23-day-seven-by-larry-eder.html

Hassan_SifanFV-EuroXC13.jpgSifan Hassan, photo by PhotoRun.net

This is report 3 of the XC European Results for 2015-2016 season. The cross country results are compiled for RunBlogRun by Carles Baronet.

The level of depravity, corruption and extortion that was revealed on November 9 by the WADA Special Commission surprised even me. I have not finished reading the 323 page missive, but it will be a long weekend of reading, I am sure.

In the following article, I take a stab at the issues that are threatening our sport, and what actions I believe, that Mr. Coe should do, to show the world that he truly means to clean up the sport.

Coe_Seb-Gala10.jpgSeb Coe, in calmer days (2010), photo by PhotoRun.net

Larry's note here...

image1.jpg
Dave Hunter surrounded by the gorgeous quartet of [left to right]: Sharon Day Monroe, Tia Brooks, Shelby Vaughn, and Michelle Carter!!

So, here is the real story on David Hunter: the guy loves track & field. In his second career, after a life in the world of business, David is now living his dream: announcing track meets, and cross country meets for that matter, and writing about the sport he loves.

I have always thought that the really fine writers can communicate to their readers the excitement of events that they never have tried. That is what Mr. Hunter has done here: his obvious affection for Michelle Carter, and her journey to be a clean Olympic medalist is just what our sport needs right now.

The truth is, the athletes know. Not much gets by your fellow competitors. While we are in the darkening clouds of extortion and corruption in our sport, we must reach the maelstrom before we can find the higher ground.

XC2_2588.jpgNCAA XC Div 1, photo by Kyle Terwillegar

As you begin your taper for the big races, remember where you came from this season. Enjoy the successes and focus on the upcoming events. This is your last hard workout of the week, as you get to relax the rest of the week and enjoy some Turkey on Thanksgiving!

Week 24, Day Two, November 24, 2015:

Warm up, 1-2 miles, stretch, then, get on the track, two miles, sprint the straightaways, jog the turns, try to do it at about your current 5k race pace.

Jog an easy half mile, then, finish up with three 200 meter stride outs, running each one faster than the one before.

Cooldown, 1-2 miles.

Here is the link to your 23 previous weeks of training:http://www.runblogrun.com/2015/11/2015-runblogrun-fall-cross-country-challenge-week-23-day-seven-by-larry-eder.html

IMG_2523.jpegThe ceremonial lap winner, by Jeff Benjamin

IMG_1036.jpegNYC Parks Adena Long (left), with ceremonial first lap winners, photo by Jeff Benjamin

This story has been two decades in the making, and it is the kind of story that makes Jeff Benjamin text me each night, with "when are you going to post my story?"

Well, Jeff, here it is, right in time for Thanksgiving!

DSCN7498.JPGMary Keitany, KASS Marathon, November 10, photo by www.kenyanathlete.com

Justin Lagat wrote this piece about a two weeks ago, on the KASS Marathon. He ran into several of Kenya's top athletes, including the two time winner of the New York City Marathon, Mary Keitany.

XC2_3098.jpgNCAA XC, near the finish! photo by Kyle Terwillegar/USTFCCCA

With most state meets now done, the NCAA's over, the season is coming down to the FootLocker Regionals, NXN Regionals, NXN and FootLocker Champs and the USA Club Champs.

We will focus on tapering the next three weeks.

Keys in tapering: Sleep eight to ten hours a night. Get in a nap each afternoon if you can. Hydrate (stay away from soft drinks). Stretch well before and after workouts. Always change out of wet clothes immediately.

Monday, November 23, 2015, Week 24, Day One: Warm up, 1-2 miles, easy 3-5 miles, 6 x 150 meter stride outs, 1-2 mile cooldown.

Here is the link to your 23 previous weeks of training:http://www.runblogrun.com/2015/11/2015-runblogrun-fall-cross-country-challenge-week-23-day-seven-by-larry-eder.html

AKTIV against Cancer Photo.jpg

Jack Waitz- AKTIV Against Cancer,Mary Wittenberg- Global CEO of Virgin Sport, Michael Capiraso- Road Runners, Helle Aanesen- AKTIV Against Cancer, George Hirsch- Road Runners, photo courtesy of AKTIV Against Cancer
This is the fourth of our new AKTIV Against Cancer diaries series. In this video, the Shoe Addicts provide a view into the AKTIV Against Cancer Luncheon, celebrating Mary Wittenberg and her support of the sport of running and advancing opportunities for women in running.
The Shoe Addicts thank adidas for their support and encourage all to review the AKTIVagainstCancer.com website. AKTIV Against Cancer is the foundation begun by Helle Aanesen and the late Grete Waitz.
The goal of AKTIV Against Cancer is to show the relationship between excercise and cancer and to support cancer patients with fitness programs as part of their support.

XC2_2138.jpgNCAA XC, Division 1, photo by Kyle Terwillegar/USTFCCCA

This is a list of cross country events from around the world, compiled by Alfons Juck of EME News.

Coe_Seb-Gala10.jpgSeb Coe, photo by PhotoRun.net

Here is the IAAF response to Sunday Times (UK) questions regarding what they percieve are unanswered questions with the protocals of the process of determining World Championship sites. In particular, the Sunday Times (UK) is questioning the process in determining Eugene, Oregon as the 2021 site for the World Outdoor Championships.

MenStart-CinqueXC14.jpgCinque XC 2014, photo by PhotoRun.net

This is the second report on the XC European Results for 2015.2016, compiled by our friend, Carles Baronet. Carles Baronet writes the blog, Track In Sun.

This piece was posted as an example of how to reach to media groups to promote your teams.

XC2_2603.jpgNCAA XC Men's race, photo by Kyle Terwillinger/USTFCCCA.org

RunBlogRun is a member of the Running Network, where we have 40 websites and 25 magazines (print and digital) covering North America, Europe, the Caribbean and Africa.

If you have updates on your teams, please send them to runblogrun@gmail.com, and we will send them to the right website and magazine.

Derrick_Chris1c-USAxc15.jpgChris Derrick, photo by PhotoRun.net

Chris Derrick is one of our favorite runners. A Stanford graduate, now running with Coach Jerry Schumacher's Nike Bowerman club, Chris has had moments of brilliance.

Cross country is one of Chris Derrick's talents. I was fortunate to see him run in Edinburgh at the Great Edinburgh Cross Country in 2014.

Will this be Chris Derrick's year?

We think so!

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Tuesday: Tempo Day or...

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Try this: Warm up, go to the track, run three miles on the track, where you jog the turns and sprint the curves. Get the speed going here, have some fun, change some gears, then, cool down for two to three miles.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Fast Day

Warm up, go to the track, run a mile at race pace, jog a mile, then, finish up with six 300 meter cut downs, making each one faster than one before. Have some fun, cooldown with three easy miles.

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, do a long cool down.

Sunday: Easy 7-11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are recovering from the racing.

joetta clark family .jpgThe famous Clark family (left to right): Coach J.J. Clark, Jearl-Miles Clark, Joetta Clark Diggs, Hazel Mae Clark. (Photo courtesy of Joetta Clark Diggs.)

Elliott Denman wrote this piece in early October about the Joetta Clark Diggs Tenth Annual Sports Extravaganze, held September 18, 2015. The event is a fundraiser for the Joetta Clark Diggs Sports Foundation. As everyone should know, Joetta Clark Diggs was an Olympian in 1988, 1992, 1996 and 2000.

22455795630_a3496ed0d0_k-2.jpg

Walid Ktila, photo courtesy of IPC Athletics

This is the final column that Stuart Weir did on the 2015 IPC World Athletics Champs on November 2, 2015. I had missed the column and am just catching up.

Stuart Weir covered the World Champs in Doha, Qatar for eleven days, and provided us some great columns.

This was the first time that RunBlogRun has covered IPC events, and with the warm response we recieved from you, our readers, we will be adding IPC coverage of upcoming events.

It is a total mystery to me why there is so little coverage in the U.S. Perhaps that lack of interest by NBC, the Olympic broadcaster is part of what is missing. So, if you, dear readers, want more on IPC events, then facebook and tweet friends at the Peacock broadcasting network on the need to show IPC coverage.

Walsh_TomH-Brussels15.jpgTomas Walsh, photo by PhotoRun.net

Tomas Walsh is a fine Kiwi shot putter. Tomas came up through the junior ranks to finish fourth in Beijing at the World Championships. Walsh is a fierce competitor, and gives the fans a real show. Looking forward to seeing Tomas Walsh compete in Portland at the World Indoors!

Kamworor_Geoffrey-World15.jpgGeoffrey Kamworor, photo by PhotoRun.net

I saw Geoffrey Kamworor first when he won the IAAF World Half Marathon Champs in March 2014. Then, Mr. Kamworor won the World Cross Country in March 2015. His silver medal in the 10,000 meters, in Beijing was his second battle with Mo Farah, after the 10,000 meters at the Pre Classic.

Kamworor is a tough competitor and well conditioned racer. The half marathon may be his perfect distance.

Thumbnail image for syracuse.jpg

PHOTO: The Syracuse University men's team leading the 2015 NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships in Louisville, KY, on Nov. 21. From left to right, Martin Hehir, Philo Germano (partially obscured), Dan Lennon, Justyn Knight, and Colin Bennie (photo by Chris Lotsbom for Race Results Weekly)
The NCAA Division 1 Cross Country Champs were held in Louiseville, Kentucky today. Here is Chris Lotsbom's fine story on the championships.

XC2_2998.jpgThird time is the charm for Mr. Cheserek! photo by Kyle Twerlinger/USTFCCCA

The NCAA Divison 1 Cross Country is part of a magical day of cross country across the country. Ed Cheserek won his third NCAA cross country title today. Syracuse won the Men's title and New Mexico took the women's title.

True-SambuWide1-BAA5km15.jpgBen True, Stephen Sambu, photo by PhotoRun.net

This is Ben True.

In high school, Ben True ran cross country running and also cross country skied. In college, Ben True was All American in both cross country running and skiing.

In 2013, Ben True was sixth in the World Cross Country. In the USA Outdoor, he was fourth in both the 10,000 meters and 5,000 meters.

In 2014, Ben True ran 13:02 for the 5000 meters, in a amazing preview of what was to come from True, at the Payton Jordan Invitational.

In 2015, Ben True did more than open a few eyes. He took second both the 10,000 meters and 5,000 meters at the US championships. In Beijing, Ben True was sixth in the WC final 5,000 meters.

What will he do in 2016?

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Tuesday: Tempo Day or...

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Try this: Warm up, go to the track, run three miles on the track, where you jog the turns and sprint the curves. Get the speed going here, have some fun, change some gears, then, cool down for two to three miles.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Fast Day

Warm up, go to the track, run a mile at race pace, jog a mile, then, finish up with six 300 meter cut downs, making each one faster than one before. Have some fun, cooldown with three easy miles.

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, do a long cool down.

Sunday: Easy 7-11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are recovering from the racing.

Whitfield_Mal_01.jpgMal Whitfield, photo courtesy of USATF.org

Mal Whitfield died on November 18, 2015, at the age of 91. "Marvelous Mal" Whitfield was a five time Olympic medalist, from 400 meters, to the 800 meters, and then, the 4x400 meters.

Mr. Whitfield also served our country as a tail gunner, as well as a US Sports Ambassador, visiting 132 countries!

Here is a tribute to Mal Whitfield, by our own Elliott Denman.

syracuse 2.jpg

PHOTO: (left to right) Martin Hehir, Colin Bennie and Justyn Knight finishing third, second and first, respectively, at the NCAA Northeast Regional Cross Country Championships in Boston's Franklin Park on November 13, 2015 (Photo by Chris Lotsbom for Race Results Weekly)
This was the piece that Chris Lotsbom and David Monti wrote the night before the NCAA meet on the chances of Syracuse winning the NCAA Cross Country Championships.

The Nike Border Clash started seventeen years ago.

To me, it is the most important event that Nike does, anywhere in the world. Cross country is our sport at its purest, and the more mud, the more fog, the more cold, the better!

2013-11-23 16.46.34.jpgNike Border Clash, November 2013, photo by Larry Eder

Derrick_Chris-USAxc15.jpgChris Derrick, photo by PhotoRun.net

Watching Chris Derrick win the 2014 Great Edinburgh Cross Country, I was impressed not only with his win, but, more importantly, how he won. His strength, his sense of purpose, and his drive were all present as he traversed the 2000 meter loops with high grass, water and mud.

Chris Derrick made running look so easy that day. It wasn't easy. But, he was in a groove, from training well and challenging himself.

Will you make running look easy tomorrow?

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Tuesday: Tempo Day or...

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Try this: Warm up, go to the track, run three miles on the track, where you jog the turns and sprint the curves. Get the speed going here, have some fun, change some gears, then, cool down for two to three miles.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Fast Day

Warm up, go to the track, run a mile at race pace, jog a mile, then, finish up with six 300 meter cut downs, making each one faster than one before. Have some fun, cooldown with three easy miles.

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, do a long cool down.

Sunday: Easy 7-11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are recovering from the racing.

Rhines_Jen1-SanDiego15.jpgJenn Rhines, photo by PhotoRun.net

Jenn Rhines was a fine cross country runner in high school and college. Her cross country background helped her to three Olympic teams, on track and the road.

Week 23, Day Four, November 19, 2015, Thursday: Fast Day,

Warm up, go to the track, run a mile at race pace, jog a mile, then, finish up with six 300 meter cut downs, making each one faster than one before. Have some fun, cooldown with three easy miles.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Tuesday: Tempo Day or...

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Try this: Warm up, go to the track, run three miles on the track, where you jog the turns and sprint the curves. Get the speed going here, have some fun, change some gears, then, cool down for two to three miles.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Fast Day

Warm up, go to the track, run a mile at race pace, jog a mile, then, finish up with six 300 meter cut downs, making each one faster than one before. Have some fun, cooldown with three easy miles.

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, do a long cool down.

Sunday: Easy 7-11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are recovering from the racing.

Cantwell_Christian-Karlsruhe12.jpgChristian Cantwell, photo by PhotoRun.net

Watching Christian Cantwell, when he is in shape, is a treat for the throws fan. Christian is a three time World Indoor Champion, and his performances, along with his fellow competitors in the shot, have made the event grow in popularity.

Big guys throwing the sixteen pound shot is a lot of grunting and thuds when the shot hits the ground.

John Nubani, the manager of Christian Cantwell, told EME News that Christian is looking to take his fourth indoor title in Portland in March 2016.

Carles Baronet is providing us weekly updates on the European Cross Country season. Problem is, I am about two weeks behind, so watch for XC Euro 1,2 and 3 posted today to get you up to date! Carles Baronet publishes Track In Sun Blog.

Masses-Campaccio15.jpgCampaccio 2015, photo by PhotoRun.net

Under Armour logo .png

During The Shoe Addicts visit to the Bank of America Chicago Marathon, they visited the Under Armour store in Chicago on Michigan Drive.

This video tour is part of the RunBlogRun LIFESTYLE programming, provided by our digital partners, The Shoe Addicts. The Under Armour store is an example of branding and selling the Under Armour experience, one of the most popular sports brands in the world.

For more information on Under Armour, please go to www.underarmour.com.

StadiumWideDay-World13.jpgMoscow, photo by PhotoRun.net

In this world of instant communications, time is still needed to change cultures and systems. I find the comments that ARAF can be completely torn down and then rebuilt in a few months as not taking the provisional explusion in the seriousness of the situation.

We have important NGBs that do not have consistent testing programs. Without consistent testing, all performances are suspect. And that is not fair to the clean athletes, clean coaches and fans of those countries.

I have tried to hold my tongue over the past few days as everyone from the IOC on, not only expressed confidence in Russia changing its ways. But, if this is a serious undertaking, and not just a whitewash, then, all involved have to note that this could take some time.

I applaud iNADO, IAAF, WADA in making the difficult decisions to out one of the most important global sport powers. I also believe that there are good and honest sports people in Russia that will take the WADA report seriously and make the changes to bring Russia back into the global athletic fold. I find the name calling and blame game abhorrent and disruptive.

Redemption does not come overnight. I find the talk of Russia changing its system in three months as ludicrous as people who speak, soberly, of a two hour marathon.

A two hour marathon is not possible, by humans without all kinds of doping. It is silly and insulting to the people who actually run marathons, and who earn those 2:04s, 3:04s or 5:04s.

Likewise, if, as WADA has suggested that a system was in place where cheating was part of the national system, that Russian security people bullied drug testers in Sochi, and that a Moscow doping lab destroyed 1,400 plus drug tests, then, we have a problem that will not be overcome overnight.

Take WADA's report seriously.

Gemili_AdamR1a-Euros14.jpgAdam Gemili, photo by PhotoRun.net

Adam Gemili is one of British Athletics finest athletes. He got into sprinting after playing football (soccer in U.S.). I have been as impressed with his running as well as his thoughtful comments to the media. The crowds love Adam in UK.

Dibaba_Genzebe1f-Paris15.jpgGenzebe Dibaba, photo by PhotoRun.net

Schippers_DafneFL-EuroInd15.jpgDafne Schippers, photo by PhotoRun.net

Wlodarczyk_Anita1b-Beijing15.jpgAnita Wlodarczyk, photo by PhotoRun.net

Genzebe Dibaba, Dafne Schippers and Anita Wlodarczyk are the final three for the IAAF Athlete of the Year for women. Pretty impressive trio for the 2015 award. Nice to see a hammer thrower in the mix, I must say!

Rhines_Jen1-SanDiego15.jpgJenn Rhines, photo by PhotoRun.net

We spoke to three time Olympian Jenn Rhines on Wednesday, October 28, in New York at the JackRabbit running store at Ten Columbus Circle.

RunBlogRun interviewed Jenn about her thoughts on the AKTIV Against Cancer program, the legacy of the late Grete Waitz. Jenn spoken very movingly about her time with Grete Waitz and how her late mother used fitness walking in her battle with cancer.

Jenn Rhines is one of the top Masters runners in the world. She continues to compete in cross country, road racing and on the track. We asked her for her suggestions on women running at various levels of fitness. Watch for those comments in future videos with Jenn Rhines.

Special thanks to the Shoe Addicts for the video.

Luke Puskedra chicago .jpgLuke Puskedra, photo by PhotoRun.net

Lessons learnt in cross country training and racing folllow you for the rest of your life. Luke Puskedra took those lessons he learnt in cross country and he stayed in control in the Chicago Marathon, running a personal best by five minutes.

Week 23, Day Three, November 18, 2015, Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Tuesday: Tempo Day or...

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Try this: Warm up, go to the track, run three miles on the track, where you jog the turns and sprint the curves. Get the speed going here, have some fun, change some gears, then, cool down for two to three miles.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Fast Day

Warm up, go to the track, run a mile at race pace, jog a mile, then, finish up with six 300 meter cut downs, making each one faster than one before. Have some fun, cooldown with three easy miles.

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, do a long cool down.

Sunday: Easy 7-11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are recovering from the racing.

Molly Huddle is one of America's best distance runners. Her five U.S. championships this fall hints at her domination of the road racing scene. This is a nice interview on her comments on giving lifetime bans for doping cheats.

RunBlogRun concurs, although we are not sure it is legal in U.S. or Europe.

Bert Rosenthal, one of the finest sports journalist of his generation, has died at the age of 79. Bert died on November 15, 2015 in Scottsdale.

3f0a3442a9adf433870f6a7067000f43_r900x493.jpg

FILE - This Jan. 10, 1980, file photo, shows Associated Press sports writer Bert Rosenthal in New York. Rosenthal, who became one of the top track and field writers in the United States in more than four decades with The Associated Press, died Sunday night, Nov. 15, 2015, in Scottsdale, Ariz., where he had lived since his retirement from the AP in 2001. He was 79. (AP Photo/Marty Lederhandler, File) The Associated Press

If you read anything on track and field from 1970 to 2001, in U.S. newspapers, you read stories by Bert Rosenthal. Bert was a keen observer of the sport, who possessed a keen work ethic. I believe that he covered seven Summer Olympics and all of the World Championships from 1983 to 1999.

His Bronx accent never left him, but what was most telling was his attention to detail and his no b.s. approach to writing about the sport. Bert knew had to contact anyone and everyone. An interviewer with Bert knew that he might not agree with them, he might not even like them, but he would be fair and honest.

Bert Rosenthal loved the sport. He was, like the late James Dunaway, a protector of the sport as well. Rosenthal did not suffer fools.

I recall a conversation about a particularly colorful character in American athletics who had tried to hide a story from Bert. Bert finished his interview, and took his notes, and then sat down in the press room. "After someone lies to you, you know one thing about them, they are liars." was a Bert Rosenthal comment.

The AP crew treated Bert with reverence, as did many of us who joined him at many of the events. Bert could write about any sport. Near the end of his career, Bert ended up in the hospital in Sydney due to his heart problems. I remember hearing about it from James Dunaway. Bert had finished a story on deadline while in the hospital.

Bert Rosenthal, as Reuter's Gene Cherry noted, was one of the finest track writers of his generation.

PhotoRun's Victor Sailer wrote to that, above all else, Bert Rosenthal was a great friend to other reporters and photographers and a gentleman.

Bert Rosenthal will be missed.

Luke Puskedra chicago .jpgLuke Puskedra, photo courtesy of Chicago Marathon

In the Chicago Marathon, I saw the towering figure of Luke Puskedra at the back of the lead pack. I remember noting that Luke should just stay out of trouble, and run his race.

And Luke Puskedra did run his race.

His five minute personal best comes a year after he gave up running for a bit. With the support of his wife and his coach, Luke Puskedra came back to running.

His 2:10:34 not only marks him as one of the top five qualifiers in the US Olympic marathon trials, scheduled for February 13, 2016, but makes him our RunBlogRun American Male Athlete for October 2015!

Thanks to the Shoe Addicts for this video saluting Luke Puskedra.

Norm Ogilvie .jpgNorm Ogilvie, photo courtesy of Duke University

Norm Ogilvie is the first coach in a new monthly focus from David Hunter on coaches that RunBlogRun will be placing in our partner, Coaching Athletics.

Norm has developed Duke's program over the past two and one half decades. Most of us remember Duke as a powerhouse for some time. It was not always that way. Norm is a fine example of how one builds on success.

Special thanks to David Hunter, glad he survived sitting next to me for two plus weeks in Beijing.

The attacks on Friday night, November 13, 2015, in Paris came when Parisians were doing what they do best: enjoying the company of their friends and families in cafes, clubs and at sporting events.

I love Paris and an fortunate enough to spend about a month a year in Paris and its environs. While my French is passable, my love of the culture, people and history is emphatic.

The attacks were done on purpose when Parisians were enjoying their lives, from the Stade de France to the Bataclan Music Club.

Martin Reardon, a security official with much experience, wrote this piece for Al Jazeera, an important media source on global news. Reardon pulls no punches, his thoughts are well formulated and thoughtful.

11406963_10153356431897429_88046762400689876_n.jpgDavid Rudisha at NASDAQ, photo from NASDAQ

For our sport to grow and prosper, we need to take a different approach to promotions.

On June 11, 2015, the adidas GP opened NASDAQ. Sports and business. Sports stars want to be successful in business and successful businessmen desire to be sports stars.

NASDAQ puts the adidas GP in front of a whole different audience. It also gives our sport a chance to be seen by the people who could with the look at a powerpoint, become the next sponsor of athletics.

The adidas GP has to work hard to stand out in Big Apple. Two years ago, adidas GP held a competition in Times Square, next to the venerable Macys.

Hats off to Mark Wetmore and his team at Global Athletics & Marketing, who put on the adidas Grand Prix. Thinking out of the box is how sports marketers and managers grow their sports.

Special thanks to the Shoe Addicts and adidas for their support on this project.

molly huddle.jpgMolly Huddle, Photo by Jane Monti for RRW, used with permission

Molly Huddle finished the best season of her life. As Tim Hutchings noted so wisely today, Molly could have gone home after Beijing, but she put together the best season of her life.

Sam Chelanga won a close one, as David Monti put together in his fine piece on the .US 12 K.

My only question is this: with the fine performances of the US runners today, when will such champs be put in places where more can enjoy and see them?

Sisson_Emily1a-USout15.jpgEmily Sisson, photo by PhotoRun.net

Emily Sisson was a fine high school runner from Missouri.

She made the cover of our partner publication, Missouri Runner & Triathlete due to her fine cross country running.

After starting at Wisconsin, Emily transferred to Providence college and ran quite well, winning several NCAA titles under the watchful eye of Coach Ray Treacy. She also had a pretty cool training group, with Amy Hastings and Molly Huddle for some of her workouts.

After winning the NCAA 5000 meter title, Emily graduated and was signed by New Balance.

Training with the elite athlete Molly Huddle has been a great opportunity for Emily to see how someone grows into the professional side of the the sport.

Emily raced well in September, but in October, she really shined, taking second in the Tufts 10k in 32:18, setting a personal best. For her fine running this fall and her superb 10k in Boston, we give Emily Sisson our RBR Athlete of the Month for October 2015!

Special thanks to The Shoe Addicts for this video.

Huddle_Molly1-BAA5k15.jpgMolly Huddle, Photo by PhotoRun.net

Two years ago, I watched Molly Huddle run the 10,000 meters at the Payton Jordan. She and Sally Kipyego were dueling and the difference at the end of the race was about five to seven seconds. It was a honest race, and two amazing athletes gave it their best. That is the best complement I can give to two racers.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Tuesday: Tempo Day or...

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Try this: Warm up, go to the track, run three miles on the track, where you jog the turns and sprint the curves. Get the speed going here, have some fun, change some gears, then, cool down for two to three miles.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Fast Day

Warm up, go to the track, run a mile at race pace, jog a mile, then, finish up with six 300 meter cut downs, making each one faster than one before. Have some fun, cooldown with three easy miles.

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, do a long cool down.

Sunday: Easy 7-11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are recovering from the racing.

DSCN7431-001-2.JPGLawi Lalang, photo by Kenyan Athlete

Justin Lagat interviewed Lawi Lalang for RunBlogRun a week ago. Here is another fine piece from our Kenyan correspondent, Justin Lagat.

Thumbnail image for sam andmolly .jpg Sam Chelanga and Molly Huddle, .US-12k National champions, photo by Jane Monti, RRW, used with permission

The following short report on the 2015 Association of Athletics Managers was written by EME News. To learn more about the AAM, please read our Q&A with their board, from February 2015:

http://www.runblogrun.com/2015/02/the-association-of-athletics-managers-the-rbr-interview-by-larry-eder.html

Huddle_Molly1g-LondongDL15.jpgMolly Huddle, photo by PhotoRun.net

So, last summer, I was watching Molly Huddle run the 5000 meters in London GP in late July. She had built up a 200 meter lead in the race, taking the big gamble and was only caught in the last 100 meters of the race. It was gutty, honest and exciting.

Week 23, Day One, November 16, 2015:

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Tuesday: Tempo Day or...

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Try this: Warm up, go to the track, run three miles on the track, where you jog the turns and sprint the curves. Get the speed going here, have some fun, change some gears, then, cool down for two to three miles.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Fast Day

Warm up, go to the track, run a mile at race pace, jog a mile, then, finish up with six 300 meter cut downs, making each one faster than one before. Have some fun, cooldown with three easy miles.

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, do a long cool down.

Sunday: Easy 7-11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are recovering from the racing.

molly huddle.jpgMolly Huddle wins .US 12k, from Jane Monti, RRW, used with permission

The difference between winning and loosing can be quite small. In August, Molly Huddle missed a medal in the World Championships 10,000 meter by one step. As TV commentator and 1984 Olympic fourth placer Tim Hutchings noted this past weekend, Molly could have gone home and ended her season.

But that is not how Molly Huddle races.

Molly Huddle won the USA 20k, then the USA 5k, and then the USA 10 miler, all in September. In October, she won the Tufts 10k in a new PB! She has raced like a runner possessed!

Funny thing was, RunBlogRun was going to give Molly our award for September, but her racing this Fall was, well, amazing. We have given her the American Athlete of the Month for September, October and November-a first for us!

Molly Huddle continues to inspire many, and her dominating win over the .US-12k this past weekend ended her 2015 season with another superb win!

Molly Huddle, as her sponsor would say, Found Her Strong!

Sisson_Emily1a-USout15.jpgEmily Sisson, photo by PhotoRun.net

Emily Sisson developed as a fine cross country runner in high school. Her elite career is built on those years of training, and now, last month, Emily ran a swift 32:18 for 10k! Emily was our RBR Athlete of Month for October!

Week 22, Day Seven, November 15, 2015, Sunday: Easy 7-11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are recovering from the racing.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Tuesday: Tempo Day or...

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Try this: Warm up, go to the track, run three miles on the track, where you jog the turns and sprint the curves. Get the speed going here, have some fun, change some gears, then, cool down for two to three miles.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Fast Day

Warm up, go to the track, run a mile at race pace, jog a mile, then, finish up with six 300 meter cut downs, making each one faster than one before. Have some fun, cooldown with three easy miles.

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, do a long cool down.

Sunday: Easy 7-11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are recovering from the racing.

The attacks on the city of Paris on Friday evening were at restaurants, a music venue and the Stade de France. The attackers wanted to disrupt the reasons why many live in Paris: the crazy and colorful lives lead by twelve million people in an area much too small (as noted by Mr. Kuper of FT).

I am posting this picture from the Stade de France, the stadium I go to each July, with 45,000 of my closest friends to watch a great night of track and field.

Ayana-DibabaFE1-Paris15.jpgStade de France, photo by PhotoRun.net

It should be noted that USATF's Stephanie Hightower and WADA were two of the fastest responses to the IAAF announcement of the expulsion. A couple of comments. It should also be noted that Mr. Bach's comments came AFTER his meeting with the Russian Olympic Committee.

The Russians should be noted for commenting out both sides of their proverbial mouths. I am not sure that they believed the suspension would ever happen.

RedSquare1b-Moscow13.jpgRed Square, Moscow, photo by PhotoRun.net

When I was asked how the the IAAF Council would respond, I said I hoped that ARAF would be suspended, but was not sure it would happen. The IAAF Council pleasantly surprised me.

The IAAF did not have to do this. The provisional expulsion allows Seb Coe some room to negotiate with Russian Sports culture. It is obvious that Mr. Putin will not be a happy camper or Russian President if Russian sports are not allowed to compete globally under Russian colors.

My guess is that Mr. Bach and the ROC Alexander Zhukov had a fascinating conversation this morning. Bach does not want to loose Russia from the IOC fold, but he also understands that all of the world is watching.

The suspension of the ARAF is huge sports politics. Seb Coe has shown that he will play for keeps and that no federation is more important that the future of the IAAF and his legacy as the leader of the global sport.

I was writing about the IAAF council meeting, when Simon Kupers, an FT columnist who lives in Paris, noted that he heard a sound like fireworks. He then noted it might not be fireworks.

And then, Paris was attacked in six different locations. This story is gives one a feel of what one young adult felt after living through such carnage.

#Pray for Paris, #Pray for humanity

Here are the reactions from Russian coaches and athletes to the provisional suspension of the All Russia Athletics Federation on Friday evening, November 13, 2015...

Isinbaeva_ElenaA1a-World13.jpg

MoscowM-World13.jpgMoscow 2013, photo by PhotoRun.net

The reactions to the provisional suspension of ARAF have come quickly. EME News compiled several responses from Russian sources...

The Financial Times is one of my favorite newspapers. When I fly to Europe, I pick up an FT an read away for a couple of hours, enjoying the fantastic writing and thoughtful views of our changing world.

When I am in Wisconsin, I go to Scotty's EAT MOR, a wonderful breakfast dive run by a brother and a sister, and their friend. I was the guy, for several years, who brough in the "pink paper", and left copies there all week. My fellow EAT MOR types liked the paper and would comment on some of the columns.

I found out about the attacks in Paris through Simon Kuper's twitter commentary. Here is his column on his night in the Stade de France and the terror in the city he has called home for 13 years.

Oh, and consider FT.com as a great resource for learning about the world around us.

Jenks-Rohrer1-FLmwXC14.jpgFootLocker Midwest, November 2014, photo by PhotoRun.net

Week 22, Day Six, November 14, 2015,

Saturday: Race Day

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, do a long cool down.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Tuesday: Tempo Day or...

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Try this: Warm up, go to the track, run three miles on the track, where you jog the turns and sprint the curves. Get the speed going here, have some fun, change some gears, then, cool down for two to three miles.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Fast Day

Warm up, go to the track, run a mile at race pace, jog a mile, then, finish up with six 300 meter cut downs, making each one faster than one before. Have some fun, cooldown with three easy miles.

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, do a long cool down.

Sunday: Easy 7-11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are recovering from the racing.

Koech_Gladys-KenyaXC15.jpgKenyan cross country, photo by PhotoRun.net

NAIROBI (KEN): Kenya's government has approved the immediate establishment of the Anti-Doping Agency of Kenya (ADAK), report AP. ADAK will be responsible for doping tests in Kenya, oversee the prosecution of cases, and develop and execute anti-doping rules and regulations. The move comes while the country is under increasing pressure to improve their anti-doping structure due to a spate of high profile positive tests and allegations of complacency.

Editors note: This is welcome news. That the Kenyan Government approves the ADAK is important. For Kenya's running to be taken seriously, consistent drug testing is paramount.

Stephanie Hightower.jpgStephanie Hightower, photo from IAAF.org

Stephanie Hightower commented on the ARAF provisional suspension. The note came from Public Affairs Officer Jill Geer.

"The IAAF Council examined this matter very thoughtfully, fully aware of the extraordinary action we ultimately decided to take. The WADA report was clear in its evidence and unequivocal in its recommendations. From Council's perspective, in light of the evidence, suspension was the only proper course of action. The IAAF has an obligation to protect athletes, and this action sends a clear message to clean athletes that protecting them and protecting the sport, with a culture of accountability, is our top priority. It is my hope as a Council member that this process also will spur a review of the IAAF governance structure, and that we will act to implement WADA's recommendations of instituting an ombudsman and compliance officer. Although this is a difficult time, in the long term, the sport ultimately will be stronger for it."

RedSquare1a-Moscow13.jpgRed Square, photo by PhotoRun.net

The responses to the IAAF Council meeting today was fast and wide. The support has been overwhelming, although Mr. Mutko did claim, just before the meeting that the IAAF hid 155 doping tests.

StadiumWide-World13.jpgMoscow 2013, photo by PhotoRun.net

The IAAF council voted, 22-1, to provisionally suspend ARAF from the IAAF. This comes less than one week after the Independent Commission, headed by Dick Pound, for WADA delivered its 300 plus page report, citing ARAF for a systematic approach to doping and a program that suggests the knowledge and support of the Russian sports culture.

How will this play out? It is too fluid to really analyze at this time. The provisional suspsension is an actual tool, in my mind, for President Coe to manage the rebuilding of ARAF to be part of the world athletics community.

Dibaba_GenzebeH-Carlsbad15.jpgGenzebe Dibaba, photo by PhotoRun.net

Week 22, Day Five, November 13, 2015, Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Tuesday: Tempo Day or...

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Try this: Warm up, go to the track, run three miles on the track, where you jog the turns and sprint the curves. Get the speed going here, have some fun, change some gears, then, cool down for two to three miles.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Fast Day

Warm up, go to the track, run a mile at race pace, jog a mile, then, finish up with six 300 meter cut downs, making each one faster than one before. Have some fun, cooldown with three easy miles.

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, do a long cool down.

Sunday: Easy 7-11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are recovering from the racing.

StadiumWide-World13.jpgLushniki Stadium, photo by PhotoRun.net


MOSCOW (RUS): All-Russia Athletics Federation Acting President Vadim Zelichenok confirmed their response to the allegations of corruption and doping cover-ups published in the World Anti-Doping Agency Independent Commission were sent to IAAF. But insisted they were not guilty of systematic violations and should not be banned from the sport. AP informs that ARAF says it will partially admit to the charges leveled against it by the World Anti-Doping Agency commission. Zelichenok says that in the response ''we admit some things, we argue with some things, some are already fixed, it's a variety,'' but declined to provide further details, saying ''it's not for the press.'' The IAAF Council will meet via conference call on Friday, ARAF general secretary Mikhail Butov is the member of the council.

MOSCOW (RUS): Russian Sport minister Vitaliy Mutko declared that Russia is not going to boycott Olympic Games 2016 even if Russian athletics team is suspended from Rio. "Russia is against the boycott and against political interference in sport. We are not going to boycott anything anywhere. Russia is a reliable partner of the international Olympic movement,"said Mutko. Informs R-Sport.

MOSCOW (RUS): After the meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin dedicated to preparation for Rio Olympics, head of Russian NOC Aleksander Zhukov stressed that Russia would fight for its athletes to take part in the Olympic Games 2016. According to him, the deprivation of such a possibility would be a violation of athletes rights. "Now the important thing is to protect our clean athletes, they should not be punished through no fault of their own. We know what is the task before us," Zhukov said to national media. AIPS informs that he arrived in Lausanne at lunchtime on Thursday, set to commence a diplomatic offensive to salvage the image of the nation.

KYIV (UKR): Two Ukrainian athletics legends IOC Council member, IAAF Vice President Sergey Bubka and IOC member, two-time Olympic champion Valeriy Borzov insist that innocent athletes must never experience a repeat of the Los Angeles Games. "What I experienced in 1984, along with a number of other athletes, must never happen again. Many promising athletes never got the chance to compete for an Olympic medal after that. We have a responsibility to protect clean athletes from any form of mass exclusion, we cannot punish them. As IAAF and key stakeholders in the world of sport, we must act. In full cooperation with WADA, which in turn relies on the full support of governments, national associations and Olympic committees, we must go through this case by case, person by person. And we must remember that this scandal does not just concern athletes, this is a case of entire entourages behind them, which must be stopped," said Bubka in his quote to AIPS web. "I don't support such sanctions as suspension of whole national federations from Olympic Games. In such case, innocent athletes can become the victims. Such decisions can change cardinally not only their careers but all their lives as well. We already had boycott examples in Moscow and Los Angeles," said Borzov to Russian media.

MONACO (MON): IAAF published a statement about Russian bank VTB ending its partnership with the IAAF. VTB has expressed no interest to extend its present contract, the last event of which was the IAAF World Championships in Beijing. The contract will come to a natural end in 2015, writes the IAAF. VTB first deputy president Vasily Titov says the end of the partnership deal with governing body of track and field is not related to the Russian doping scandal, writes AP.

LAUSANNE (SUI): Amidst the doping and corruption scandal rocking the Russian athletics federation and all of international sport, IOC president Thomas Bach spoke to members of the media about the International Olympic Committee's dedication to clean athletes. In his comments following WADA's International Commisson report unveiled on Monday, Bach pointed to a future of anti-doping tests becoming independent from sports federations. The IOC president also expressed his confidence that the IAAF and its new leadership headed by Lord Sebastian Coe will take the necessary measures in dealing with the Russian Athletics Federation and the implicated athletes.The IAAF has scheduled an extraordinary meeting and teleconference with the media for this Friday, with Bach adding that certain decisions are set to be revealed. Writes AIPS.

MOSCOW (RUS): Head coach of Russian athletics team Yuriy Borzakovskiy informed that all athletes of national team are continuing their preparation for next season aiming to perform in Rio. "Certainly, they feel huge pressure. It's too difficult to prepare for Games and don't know whether you will be there or no. But nobody from the team gives up. This generation of athletes in no way to blame. Why the current team should be suspended if we recall the past years?" said Borzakovskiy to national media.

MOSCOW (RUS): The Ethics Commission of Russian Olympic Committee recommended to Valentin Balakhnichev to resign from the position of the executive committee member of the organization. "Guided by the provisions of the IOC Code of Ethics, according to which the Olympic parties shall refrain from acts that could tarnish the reputation of the Olympic movement, the Ethics Commission of the Russian Olympic Committee prepared a draft decision, according to which Valentin Balakhnichev recommended to resign the ROC executive committee's membership," says the decision.

PARIS (FRA): Walking World record holder and European champion Yohann Diniz spoke with L´Équipe about the current issues. "I'm only half surprised. As an athlete, we knew that there was a system linked to doping around the Russians. The other side is that the IAAF involved...On the starting line, we fight against people who are doped but if on top of that, they are covered by the International Federation, that is really very serious. It deserves very heavy sanctions already for the Russian Federation and then back to the IAAF," he said among other.

LAUSANNE (SUI): Lausanne Laboratory Director Martial Saugy has defended his lab's destruction of samples, explaining that they were just following procedure, report 24 Heures. Saugy said that samples are often destroyed after the tests are undertaken, as they do not have the storage capacity to keep them all. Saugy explained, "Contrary to what is stated in the report, we have not received any indications ordering us to keep these samples on the long term. The huge majority of the 250,000 tests we conduct every year are destroyed after three months. We do not have the storage capacity or the budget to keep them." Reuters report that the Lausanne hospital, where the lab is based, would carry out an audit to shed full light on the matter.

Kipchoge_EluidLedsH-Berlin15.jpg

How does one talk about Eliud Kipchoge?

A brilliant beginning to his career, with his gold medal performance at the age of 18 in Saint Denis, France for the 5000 meters. A stellar decade on the track, in World Champs and Olympic Games.

Then, the transformation. From 2011 to 2013, Eliud Kipchoge moved from the track to the roads. It was a difficult transistion, but Eliud persisted. His win in Chicago in October 2014 signaled a marathoner with the speed of a track guy and the strength of a cross country star. His move in the Windy City was something to behold.

Then, April 2015, where he and Wilson Kipsang battled for nearly 25 miles before Eliud Kipchoge used that old school speed and just kicked away from the former World record holder.

KIpchoge's run in Berlin was phenomenal. Consider that the insoles of his shoes battled him for 24 miles, Eliud Kipchoge's feet were battered, but his smile was intact. His 2:04:00 marathon was the fastest of the year.

That is why he recieved our September 2015 RunBlogRun Global Athlete of the Month video award.

On November 6, Eliud Kipchoge was given the AIMS Marathoner of the Year award.

Now, Eliud has his sites on Rio. Mr. Kipchoge sees his destiny as moving from the 5000 meter medal platforn in Saint Denis to the medal stands in Rio.

Special thanks to the Shoe Addicts for their video salute!

kass marathon .jpg

Justin Lagat, our Kenyan correspondent, texted me a few hours ago to gently remind me that the KASS Marathon is two days away. So, I stayed up a bit and posted the story of Eliud Kipchoge and this piece on the marathon! Good luck to all of our friends running the KASS Marathon this weekend.

Jenks-Rohrer1-FLmwXC14.jpgFL Midwest, November 2015, photo by PhotoRun.net

Week 22, Day Four, November 12, 2015:

Thursday: Fast Day

Warm up, go to the track, run a mile at race pace, jog a mile, then, finish up with six 300 meter cut downs, making each one faster than one before. Have some fun, cooldown with three easy miles.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Tuesday: Tempo Day or...

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Try this: Warm up, go to the track, run three miles on the track, where you jog the turns and sprint the curves. Get the speed going here, have some fun, change some gears, then, cool down for two to three miles.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Fast Day

Warm up, go to the track, run a mile at race pace, jog a mile, then, finish up with six 300 meter cut downs, making each one faster than one before. Have some fun, cooldown with three easy miles.

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, do a long cool down.

Sunday: Easy 7-11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are recovering from the racing.

Kipchoge_EluidLedsH-Berlin15.jpgEliud Kipchoge, photo by PhotoRun.net

Eliud Kipchoge is the fastest marathoner of 2015, with a 2:04 win in Berlin. He also won a masterful battle in London. Is he, as Justin Lagat suggests, the prohibitive favorite for Abbott WMM?

Coe_Seb-IAAF13.jpgSeb Coe, photo by PhotoRun.net

MONACO (MON): IAAF President Sebastian Coe has vowed he will not be swayed by outside pressure when making a decision about whether or not to ban Russia following allegations of "state-sponsored" doping. "There's a lot of static around on a lot of things at the moment," Coe was quoted by insidethegames. "I can't spend my time second guessing or judging what people are saying. I can only put the processes in place. I have asked the Russian Athletics Federation to respond to the allegations. I'm not interested in the politics." If they fail to do so the IAAF's ruling Council still plan to decide what action to take during an emergency meeting due to be held this weekend. Informs insidethegames.

Editor's note: Ironically, last summer, as I went to several meets in Europe, I recall several friends of Seb Coe wondering out loud if he really wanted to be president of the IAAF. What they meant was, was Seb Coe ready to deal with the acknowleged absolute pile of junk that was about to befall the sport?

I am not sure many knew it would be this bad, but I have to admit, I believe that Seb Coe possesses the skill set to make the changes the sport needs to clean up its national federations and itself.

The recent Channel 4 (UK) interview was British media at its worst and best. The questions were going to come, and much worse is on the way, I believe. Seb Coe stayed on task, and noted that until he became President, he could not affect change.

And he is right. But there is enough blame to go around for all. A recent conversation with some keen observers of sport, and I wonder if shoe companies might change their approaches on performance bonuses, going from fast times to top performances in championships?

Four days after the Independent commission and the dust has not settled.

This is an interesting twist. Not sure how this plays in Russia, but it seems to be a real discussion. The WADA IC has obviously reached people who understand that the recommendations are much more than a threat.

Not sure what this means. My guess is that just the notion that this has grabbed Mr. Putin's attention has Russian athletics officials scrambling. I am not sure anyone would have believed that Russia would possibly be expelled from the global sports arena.

After watching Meb Keflezighi ran so well in New York, it was even more evident that Meb has an real shot at the U.S. Olympic team in the marathon.

StadiumWide-World13.jpgLushniki Stadium, Moscow, photo by PhotoRun.net

MOSCOW (RUS): Sport24.co.za informs that Russia would be ready to appoint a foreign expert to head its anti-doping laboratory, the sports minister said Wednesday, after the former director of the facility quit following the lab's suspension over allegations from the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA). "We are absolutely open and ready as a result of consultations with WADA to appoint even a foreign specialist to lead the laboratory if it is necessary," minister Vitaly Mutko told R-Sport news agency.

SOCHI (RUS): TASS informs that Russian President Vladimir Putin on Wednesday called to protect Russian athletes from the use of doping. "As regards the latest events connected with our athletics federation, I ask the sports minister, all colleagues who are connected with sports in this or that way, to pay close attention to that," Putin said during a conference on preparation for the 2016 Olympics. "It's necessary to conduct an internal investigation of our own and ensure the most open, professional, I would underscore, cooperation with international antidoping structures," he said. Responsibility of the use of dopings in sports should be personalized and those who are not responsible should not bear responsibility for others, Putin said on Wednesday.

MOSCOW (RUS): Olympic Committee of Russia (OKR) published its official statement after report of WADA independent commission about doping and corruption in Russian athletics. "Our position is clear. Anyone exposed in using of illegal drugs and anyone, who was conducive to their using in one way or another, has to be banned. If guilty is proved, the solution should be as strict as possible," statement says. OKR also calls to the IOC and the IAAF to take into account the right of honest athletes when organizations will make any further decisions based on report of special WADA commission. Clean athletes have right to participate in international sports competitions which should not be subject to limitations. "From our side we are always open for cooperation with all international organizations and we are ready to continue to support any initiatives in fight against doping. This is the only way to save the purity of the sport. OKR will work in this direction in close cooperation with the IOC, WADA, other National Olympic Committees and sports federations.

Editor's note: Russia seems to be sending a variety of messages. While Vitaly Mutko has denied much over the past 72 hours, he also now is noted as saying that they will take foreign management of the Moscow lab. And now, President Putin has asked Mutko to explain the situation. Note that Thomas Bach, IOC President took his first phone call of congratulations from President Putin. President Putin loves sports. There is no way Mr. Putin is going to stand for his country to be isolated in the global sports world. The change in the Russian system will be painful, but this is a positive sign.

Diack_Lamine-IAAFgala14.jpgLamine Diack, photo by Photorun.net

LAUSANNE (SUI): Former IAAF president Lamine Diack has resigned as an honorary member of the IOC, report Reuters. This follows his resignation from his role of President of the International Athletics Foundation yesterday. Diack is currently under investigation for corruption and money laundering.

Editor's note: The maelstrom that the sport is swimming in continues. Lamine Diack has been accused of "passive corruption. " HIs son, Pappa Diack, per the latest reports, has still not surrendered himself to French authorities.

ArcadiaXC NXN.jpgNXN, the Arcadia RC, photo by Nike communications

I love this photo. For me, it encapsulates the true lessons about cross country: one learns many lessons in our sport. The first, and the least important, in my mind, is how to run 5000 meters. The most important are how to work with others, how to challenge oneself, how to work for a common good, and how to live in a confusing world.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Tuesday: Tempo Day or...

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Try this: Warm up, go to the track, run three miles on the track, where you jog the turns and sprint the curves. Get the speed going here, have some fun, change some gears, then, cool down for two to three miles.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Fast Day

Warm up, go to the track, run a mile at race pace, jog a mile, then, finish up with six 300 meter cut downs, making each one faster than one before. Have some fun, cooldown with three easy miles.

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, do a long cool down.

Sunday: Easy 7-11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are recovering from the racing.

This morning, when I was on the global press conference for the WADA Independent Conference, I asked Mr. Pound one question. My question was about the lack of consistency of testing in Kenya and Ethiopia. Mr. Pound responded about the need to bring Kenya's testing up to grade.

That, simply is the issue.

The following article, but Juliet Macut, is one of the best pieces that I have read in some time on the issue. For some time, Kenyan officials just did not believe it was happening. Their national resource, distance running, was so vast, how would someone be silly enough to cheat?

But, the problem has been getting worse.

The Kenyan Federation needs to take their issues seriously, as their national resource of distance running is at risk. Many great Kenyan runners, who have raced and trained and raced cleanly, are being debased by a system that has little or no checks on cheating.

One knew this was going to come up again. There are always two sides to each story. In the battle for a World Champs, there are those who win and those who loose.

Stay tuned on this story.

My belief is that the U.S. should have hosted a World Outdoor champs before 2015.

Thweatt_LauraLeds-NYC15.JPGLaura Thweatt, photo by PhotoRun.net

Laura Thweatt is a fine cross country runner who ran her first marathon in NYC. The New York Marathon is a tough course over a variety of surfaces and on a tough course. Laura joked that the marathon was a long cross country course. She was right!

Week 22, Day Two, November 10, 2015

Tuesday: Tempo Day or...

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Try this: Warm up, go to the track, run three miles on the track, where you jog the turns and sprint the curves. Get the speed going here, have some fun, change some gears, then, cool down for two to three miles.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Tuesday: Tempo Day or...

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Try this: Warm up, go to the track, run three miles on the track, where you jog the turns and sprint the curves. Get the speed going here, have some fun, change some gears, then, cool down for two to three miles.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Fast Day

Warm up, go to the track, run a mile at race pace, jog a mile, then, finish up with six 300 meter cut downs, making each one faster than one before. Have some fun, cooldown with three easy miles.

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, do a long cool down.

Sunday: Easy 7-11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are recovering from the racing.

Alan Abrahamson wrote this piece today on the Independent Commission Report from WADA on the Russian doping crisis.

There are many moving parts, and there is much confusion. Alan Abrahamson provides not only clarity and reminds us that we are in historical times.

A fine piece of writing by Alan, one of his best, and one of his most important.

Our partners in Ireland, Jumping-the-Gun, wrote the following piece on why the report announced on Monday, November 9, should bring hope to those who love the sport...

rusada.jpgRUSADA logo

The report from WADA on Monday has reverberations around the world. Hundreds of athletes who competed against Russian athletes wonder if they lost medals to cheaters. How will Russian media respond? Will the current winter chill between the West and Russia only be accerbated by Mr. Pounds assertions?

The old Soviet bloc system has been well known since the early 1950s. The doping accusations make sense in light of the cold war, and the concept that sports was a global stage for Marxism. The athlete from a Soviet bloc country who did well was a daily reminder of the superiority of the Soviet culture. Sports became the new global quasi religion. With the interest in the Olympics, and money in sports, any means that gave the Soviet athlete the world stage made sense and could be, by some, justified.

But, as Mr. Pound noted, this is not a problem isolated to Russia, nor to the sport of athletics. The over valuing of sports, the money in sports and the cult of personality around sports culture are also to blame. "We all have a part in this," noted one of my keen observers.

128,000 tweets on the Russian doping crisis were recorded today on twitter.com.

Savinova_MariyaFV-WorldInd10.jpgSaminova overcomes Meadows in World Indoors 2010, from PhotoRun.net

The report today is 300 plus pages of documents supporting Mr. Pound's assertions that the Russian system of cheating was widely supported in the culture of Russia. Pound noted that FSB agents intimidated drug testers over athletes' tests in Sochi.

But the issue comes down to this. I remember, about 2003, Kathy Butler, a fine Canadian runner who ran at Wisconsin, showing me how much money (about $60k), she thought she lost due to a Russian runner who had obviously cheated, but got off due to a break in the drug testing protocal.

I think of Kathy's comments to me every time I see an athlete like Jenny Meadows or Alysia Montano, who were cheated out of medals for years.

Nothing, nothing can give them back their medals, or that wonderful moment when you know that all of those years of hard work, those times of fear brought on by injuries, were worth it.

How does one explain that your moment will NEVER be felt?

INDEPENDENT COMMISSION - REPORT 1

IN FORCE

In December 2014, WADA launched an Independent Commission (IC) to investigate the validity of allegations made by ARD's documentary titled 'The secrets of Doping: How Russia makes its winners?'. The documentary alleged doping practices; corrupt practices around sample collection and results management; and, other ineffective administration of anti-doping processes that implicate Russia, the IAAF, athletes, coaches, trainers, doctors and other members of athletes' entourages; as well as, the accredited laboratory based in Moscow and the Russian Anti-Doping Agency (RUSADA).

The attached Report, which was released on 9 November, summarizes the IC's findings.

The IC's Terms of reference and the Addendum to the original Terms of Reference can be found on our website.

Related News

WADA receives Independent Commission's Report into allegations of widespread doping in sport

WADA publishes Terms of Reference for Independent Commission

Statement regarding Extended Mandate of Independent Commission

WADA announces details of Independent Commission

Editor's Note: Here is the link to the WADA Independent Commission report, chaired by

Dick Pound: wada_independent_commission_report_1_en-2.pdf . RunBlogRun heartily encourages coaches, fans,

athletes and parents of athletes to check out the WADA.org site.

The press conference this morning for the Independent Commission Report for WADA, directed by Dick Pound was an amazing piece of media theatre. Dick Pound provided the assembled media (this writer was on the global conference call) with a picture of the systematic deception of the Russian Athletic Federation that, Mr. Pound believes, went much farther than athletics. His suggestions that Federal Security (FSB) was involved in Sochi cover ups was amazing.

In this 90 minute time period, Pound had the world's sports media listening to his every word. He noted that the Moscow Drug Lab destroyed 1417 drug samples in December 2014, that the highest echelons of Russian sports bureucracy had to know about this program of deception.

Pound is the man to head up such an investigation. He congratulated ARD TV on their difficult investigation. Pound also noted that athletics is not the only sport and IAAF is not the only federation to be dealing with such problems.

220px-Dick_Pound.jpgDick Pound, from Wikipedia

Pound was asked two questions of current import: One was on Seb Coe's role in cleaning up the sport. Pound believed that Seb was capable of such an effort; he also gently reminded media that a big difference between what Mr. Coe said while running for office and being in office.

A media member also asked if the IAAF should be chastized for the current crisis. Pound noted that the IAAF started their anti-doping programs, but seemed to have lost its way.

The report opens as many questions as it answers. I will need a day to digest and then will write up a response.

In many ways, this is exactly what was needed. One of the most important athletic federations in the world, the Russian Federation is now faced with non-compliance, and humiliation. This is modern day equivalent to Morality play that was performend in many city centers of Europe in the Middle Ages. Dick Pound has chastized Russia with overwhelming evidence, but also hinted at the opportunity, with a complete rebuilding of an organizationa and culture that dates back to the Cold War, the chance for modern redemption in the quasi-religion of the global world: sports.

For Russia to have self respect, it must be part of the sporting world. This will come at a painful price. Hopefully other countries who have been treading on the doping line will learn from this amazing video.

rusada.jpg

RunBlogRun is posting the complete statement from WADA on the independent report delivered this morning by Dick Pound from Geneva, Switzerland at 3 pm Central European time.

I was on the media conference for the Independent report this morning.

My first impressions were the Dick Pound gets it. This is the guy, remember, who noted that Jamaica was not providing a doping protocal at the same level as countries such as the US, Great Britain and France. He did it and did not care about the consequences.

The focus of this 235 page report is the ARD TV allegations of the systematic Russian programs to cheat by doping in sports. Pound noted that the Moscow Drug testing lab had destroyed 1,417 tests in December 2014, just before WADA came into review the tests.

Pound was unable to speak on the second part of the Commissions' Report, which was forwarded to Interpol and the French authorities. As most know, Lamine Diack, and several of his cronies, as well as two sons are the focus of a criminal investigation into the ring of extortion that came about to hide results of some positive tests.

Many questions were left unanswered. Pound made sure the media knew that he had a very tight focus on this report. That was his mandate.

More to come.

This was a tumultuous morning for our sport. The Independent commission, lead by Dick Pound for WADA, has recommended that the Russian Athletic Federation needs to be rebuilt. The systematic deception, the systematic doping, and how it has, in effect, stolen money and medals from other athletes and countries will fill the pages of the media for years to come.

The blame game has begun, and the former IAAF leadership, those not in jail, will be asked how such cheating and extortion could be held on their watch. Anyone involved with the IAAF will be blamed. The current criminal investigations suggest that some will be spending time incarcerated over the level of extortion of our sport.

The following note quickly followed the end of the WADA press conference today. The IAAF has asked its members to review the WADA Independent Commission Report in an expedited fashion. Seb Coe, the President of the IAAF, has asked the Russian Federation to respond to the allegations by Friday.

Stay tuned.

Higginson_Ashley-NyrrDash15.JPGAshley Higginson, photo by PhotoRun.net

Ashley Higginson was a fine high school and college athlete, who developed into one of the finest of America's women steeplechasers in 2014 and 2015. This picture is from her NYRR 5k Dash on October 31, 2015.

Week 22, Day One, November 9, 2015

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Tuesday: Tempo Day or...

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Try this: Warm up, go to the track, run three miles on the track, where you jog the turns and sprint the curves. Get the speed going here, have some fun, change some gears, then, cool down for two to three miles.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Fast Day

Warm up, go to the track, run a mile at race pace, jog a mile, then, finish up with six 300 meter cut downs, making each one faster than one before. Have some fun, cooldown with three easy miles.

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, do a long cool down.

Sunday: Easy 7-11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are recovering from the racing.

I liked this piece from the IAAF. I think it is a step in the right direction. In the absolute cloud that is covering our sport, I want to see WADA to get to the bottom of the corruption scandals, and for the IAAF to honor its promise of transperancy.

Coe_Seb-Zurich15.jpgSeb Coe, photo by PhotoRun.net

Kipsang_Wilson-NYCM15.JPgWilson Kipsang, photo by PhotoRun.net

Wilson Kipsang is the former World Record holder in the marathon, an Olympic bronze medalist and winner of NYC and London marathons. In 2015, Wilson was second in London, a dnf in Beijing, and a fourth place in NYC Marathon. Don't under estimate Wilson Kipsang; he is a man on a mission.

In my interviews with Wilson, I have found a man who loves his family, his country, his sponsor and his sport. Wilson Kipsang is proud of his running, and wants that world record once again. In this interview, Wilson speaks about his involvement with AKTIV Against Cancer, and his concerns about cancer.

This interview is part of the AKTIV Diary series, which the Shoe Addicts are producing with the support of adidas. AKTIV mon kreft (AKTIV against Cancer) was founded in 2010 by Halle Aaeneson and Grete Waitz. With twelve sites dedicted to helping cancer patients find a fitness program that works for them, AKTIV supports research at Sloat Kettering in research to investigate how exercise can help cancer patients in their recovery.

This is the second video of our series, The AKTIV Against Cancer Diaries. For more information on AKTIV Against Cancer, please go to http://www.aktivagainstcancer.org

Kipchoge_EluidFV1-Berlin15.jpg

Eliud Kipchoge is the zen master of the Marathon.

In the fall of 2014, Eliud KIpchoge won the Bank of America Chicago Marathon. I remember asking him why he was smiling over the last four to five kilometers of the race. Eliud was winning his first World Marathon Majors, that was the reason.

In April 2015, Eliud Kipchoge and Wilson Kipsang battled for 24 miles before Eliud Kipchoge took the race over and won the London marathon in an epic race. In Berlin, despite challenges from athletes, and equipment, Eliud ran a fine 2:04:00.

Kipchoge is old school. At 18, he won the gold medal at the World Champs in St.Denis, France. A runner who came through cross country, track, and in 2011, started to look to the roads. Success did not come easy, as Eliud learnt how to run on the roads.

Eliud Kipchoge won the AIMS Marathoner of the Year for 2015. Here is his interview by Andy Edwards of Race News Service, done right after Eliud won his award.

george, jeff and fred.jpgGeorge Hirsch, Chairman of NYRR, with Jeff Benjamin, in front of Fred Lebow Exhibit

Jeff Benjamin has been texting me for the past week, reminding me about this story and where he would like the pictures to be placed. This looked like a wonderful event and Jeff, as one of our most enduring writers and observers for RunBlogRun (before that, American Track & Field and American Athletics), captured the excitement and the history of the event.

Make sure that you see the exhibit if you can!

Ritchie_TimFV-Philly15.JPgTim Ritchie, photo by PhotoRun.net

Week 21, Day Seven, November 8, 2015, Sunday: Easy 7-11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are recovering from the racing.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Tuesday: Tempo Day or...

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Try this: Warm up, go to the track, run three miles on the track, where you jog the turns and sprint the curves. Get the speed going here, have some fun, change some gears, then, cool down for two to three miles.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Fast Day

Warm up, go to the track, run a mile at race pace, jog a mile, then, finish up with six 300 meter cut downs, making each one faster than one before. Have some fun, cooldown with three easy miles.

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, do a long cool down.

Sunday: Easy 7-11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are recovering from the racing.

epson-logo.jpg

The Shoe Addicts met up with Stan Brajer, Strategic Partnership Consultant with Epson. Epson has developed, with its partner, Seiko, a series of amazing fitness monitors, called RUNSENSE. Stan Brajer explained to The Shoe Addicts how Epson will build its relationship in the run specialty category. Brajer is a long time player in the industry, and has brought in Meb Keflezighi, one of the most recognized athletes in our sport, to represent EPSON. Meb has already sent out some tweets on EPSON product.

Watch for more videos and information on Epson from RunBlogRun. Thanks to The Shoe Addicts on their video and production skills.

To learn more about the EPSON Runsense GPS Watches, please go to: http://www.epson.com/cgi-bin/Store/jsp/Landing/runsense-sports-monitors-gps.do?ref=van_runsense

This was Seb Coe's first response to the recent French investigation into Lamine Diack, his lawyer, the IAAF head of anti-drug department. This piece first ran late on Saturday, November 7, 2015 and was published on the Reuters.com news site.

The rumors of much of the misdoings have gone on at some levels of the sport for some time.

The French criminal investigation, the WADA investigation and the commentary on both will damage the perception of the sport in the immediate future. A clean sport is the goal of all who care about the sport.

The legacy of Seb Coe's Presidency could be determined by how he handles this crisis.

I was sent this by the Fairmont hotel chain. It is a fascinating infographic on the greatest marathons around the world. I like this approach to information. A fun way to tell the story of great marathons. And a brilliant way for the Fairmont hotel chain ( I have stayed at many of them) to reach out to a demographic that travels with their family.

Tenorio_AngelaQ-Eugene14.jpgAngela Tenorio, World Youth 2014, photo by PhotoRun.net

Angela Tenorio was a silver and bronze medalist in the World Youth Championships. She captivated many of the fans in Eugene, as she qualified for the semi finals by racing on her own, and went onto take the bronze medal in the 100 meters and silver in the 200 meters.

Many were surprised that the Ecuadorian flash was not in Beijing.

QUITO (ECU): Four athletics officials have been sanctioned over Angela Tenorio's non-participation at the 2015 world championships, report El Comercio. The double world junior medallist was not able to travel to China due to mistakes made in the arrangement of a visa for the 19 year old.

Defar_MeseretWide-NewOrleans13.jpgMeseret Defar, photo by PhotoRun.net

Meseret Defar has moved from the track events to the roads. Defar was a tenacious racer, and I am looking forward to seeing her back on the roads.

Meseret Defar return


LAS VEGAS (USA): SI.com informs that at the 2015 Geico Rock and Roll Las Vegas Half Marathon Olympic winner Meseret Defar is expected to return to competition action. She last competed at the Great North Half-Marathon in September 2013 and then had a baby break. Las Vegas HM is scheduled for Sunday November 15.

Kipchoge_EluidFV1-Berlin15.jpgEliud Kipchoge wins Berlin, photo by PhotoRun.net

Dibaba_MareFV-Worlds15.jpgMare Dibaba wins World Champs! photo by PhotoRun.net

Eliud Kipchoge won the London Marathon and the Berlin Marathons in 2015, making him the best male marathoner of the year. Mare Dibaba had a busy marathon year: in January 2015, she ran 2:19:52 to win the Xiamen Marathon. In April, Mare was second in the Boston Marathon, and finally, in August, Mare Dibaba won the World Champs marathon in a run to the very finish line.

The Association of International Marathons and Distance Races gives this award out each year at the Athens Marathon (the classic). We at RunBlogRun thinks it is most appropriate to give out in Athens and love that AIMS does this important award.

Eliud Kipchoge and Mare Dibaba


ATHENS (GRE): Kenya's Eliud Kipchoge and Mare Dibaba of Ethiopia received the 2015 AIMS Best Marathon Runner of the Year Awards. The award was introduced by the Association of International Marathons and Distance Races (AIMS) in 2013. The athletes were honoured during a gala in the Greek capital, where the Athens Marathon. The Authentic will be staged on the original course on Sunday. The winners were determined by a voting process amongst more than 380 member races of AIMS. The period under consideration for the 2015 AIMS Best Marathon Runner Awards was from the beginning of October 2014 to the end of September 2015. Informs Race News Service.

Kipchoge-ElGuerrouj-F-Worlds03.jpgEliud Kipchoge, photo by PhotoRun.net

Eliud Kipchoge suprised the world when he won the 5000 meters at the age of 18. Fourteen years later, Eliud Kipchoge is the AIMS Male marathoner of the year, with his wins in London and Chicago this past year! Eliud Kipchoge, in interviews this year, told us about how runners should begin in cross country, then track, then move to marathons. Eliud Kipchoge ran 2:04 this year for the marathon at Berlin. He was a strong cross country runner. Coincidence?

Week 21, Day Six, November 7, 2015, Saturday: Race Day

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, do a long cool down.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Tuesday: Tempo Day or...

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Try this: Warm up, go to the track, run three miles on the track, where you jog the turns and sprint the curves. Get the speed going here, have some fun, change some gears, then, cool down for two to three miles.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Fast Day

Warm up, go to the track, run a mile at race pace, jog a mile, then, finish up with six 300 meter cut downs, making each one faster than one before. Have some fun, cooldown with three easy miles.

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, do a long cool down.

Sunday: Easy 7-11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are recovering from the racing.

BBC announced on Saturday, November 7, that they had spoken to one of the co-writers of the WADA report on the Russian doping crisis, that will be revealed on November 9, in Geneva, Switzerland, by WADA.

With the ongoing French investigation and the leaked comments from this report, the dark cloud hanging over the IAAF and the sport seems to be only beginning.

At this time, RunBlogRun's stance is to provide a variety of well sourced media reports. The fluidity of the investigation and the leaking of the WADA report are pretty much de rigeur for modern media spectacles. Several things that should be noted: 1) Dick Pound was the first man to recognize the issue with inconsistent drug testing in some countries as compared with US, Canada and UK, 2) Dick Pound is respected as a man who is focused on cleaning up the sport, and 3) many of the issues being charged and discussed have been on the rumor mill among different circles in our sport of athletics. 4) There are many good people, in IAAF, in many of the organizations of sport, who also see that the time has come to clean up the sport. 5) The challenges are right now, what is true and what is rumor?

For our sport to move forward, we have to discuss the improprieties at our sport and those who violated our sports rules and trust must be be brought to justice.

11080921_10153225958248185_2728583592682476345_n.jpgI asked Cathal Dennehy, one of our traveling global journalists on running, to write this piece on the fine Dublin Marathon, which will be one of my visits some day. Sorry for the delay! The race was held the week before New York.

Nice to see Sonia O'Sullivan running the marathon!

niketown logo .jpg

While we were in Chicago for the Bank of America Chicago Marathon, The Shoe Addicts took some time to visit the NIKETOWN CHICAGO store on Michigan Avenue. As the Shoe Addicts note, the NIKETOWN stores are like cathedrals of Nike sport, superstores of all things Nike, and a celebration of the SWOOSH.

The NIKETOWN CHICAGO store, during the week of the marathon, celebrated the marathon, with some fun displays and some great special products for the marathon.

Make sure, when you get to the Windy City, you put the NIKETOWN CHICAGO on your bucket list!

jackrabbittlogo.png

We met with the JackRabbit team at their store at Ten Columbus Circle in Manhattan. The store was hosting a series of events around the New York City Marathon. This interview was done with Frank Pruitt, the Senior VP of Brand Communications and Consumer Experience at Jack Rabbit.

Frank was gracious enough to speak with us during the craziest weekend of the year in New York: the Marathon weekend. This short interview features Frank Pruitt as he explains the launch of JackRabbit and how he sees the consumer and brand experiences presented by their group of 72 specialty running stores.

For more information on JackRabbit, please go to JackRabbit.com.

Gebrselassie_HailePC1-Vienna13.jpgHaile Explains it all, photo by PhotoRun.net

On Wednesday, October 28, a group of lucky runners at JackRabbit Sports in Manhattan were fortunate enough to run with Wilson Kipsang (former WR holder in the marathon), Haile Gebrselassie, ( WR holder 26 different times), and Jenn Rhines (three time US Olympian, US Champion).

This interview is part of the AKTIV Diary series, which the Shoe Addicts are producing with the support of adidas. AKTIV mon kreft (AKTIV against Cancer) was founded in 2010 by Halle Aaeneson and Grete Waitz. With twelve sites dedicted to helping cancer patients find a fitness program that works for them, AKTIV supports research at Sloat Kettering in research to investigate how exercise can help cancer patients in their recovery.

This is the first of our series, The AKTIV Diaries. For more information on AKTIV Against Cancer, please go to http://www.aktivagainstcancer.org

The French investigation into the corruption at the IAAF continues. This piece, from AP NewsBreak contains most of the most current developments. Pappa Diack, the son of Lamine Diack would have been arrested, per the prosecutor, if he had been in France.

More updates to come....

The IAAF has taken the right step in cancelling the IAAF World Athletics Gala. The news is breaking on an hourly basis. A French prosecutor has released some information from the WADA investigation and has noted that the son of Lamine Diack would be under arrest now, if he were on French soil.

The IAAF has also amended its Code of Governence to allow IAAF to speak on the recent charges. We understand that a new story from Reuters.com addressed this, and we will find it and post!

This piece was from two days ago, when the story broke. I thought the Reuters reporting was spot on, and provided the facts that were needed by our readers to grasp the level of betrayal of the sport that was perpetrated.

More details to come...

Gebrselassie_Haile1d-Vienna13.jpgHaile Gebrselassie, photo by PhotoRun.net

Haile Gebrselassie may be the greatest distance runner of all times. A world record holder from the 1,500m distance indoors to the marathon, Haile started out as a cross country runner.

Week 21, Day Five, November 6, 2015, Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Tuesday: Tempo Day or...

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Try this: Warm up, go to the track, run three miles on the track, where you jog the turns and sprint the curves. Get the speed going here, have some fun, change some gears, then, cool down for two to three miles.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Fast Day

Warm up, go to the track, run a mile at race pace, jog a mile, then, finish up with six 300 meter cut downs, making each one faster than one before. Have some fun, cooldown with three easy miles.

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, do a long cool down.

Sunday: Easy 7-11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are recovering from the racing.

Each year we ask David Hunter to give us his thoughts on the Male and Female athlete of the year. This is David's comments on the Female Athlete of the Year.

David surprised me with three of his five. I like surprises.


Tell us what you think of David's picks. Email me at runblogrun@gmail.com to discuss.

Diack_Lamine-Gala10.jpgLamine Diack, photo by PhotoRun.net

This is an emerging story, that is, still 24 hours later, quite fluid.

AFP and several media organizations, including Reuters, have reported that Lamine Diack, his adviser, Habib Cisse, and IAAF former anti-drug department director, Gabriel Dolle, are all the focus of a French criminal investigation. AFP refered to the charges with Diack as "passive involvement." Nevertheless, French authorities have requested Diack not leave the country, taken his passport and required $550k US bail.

Inside the Games put this piece out on 11/4/2015 :http://www.insidethegames.biz/articles/1031424/former-iaaf-president-diack-accused-of-taking-cash-to-cover-up-russian-doping

Additional updates include that Dick Pound will reveal WADA investigation on Russian drug issues on November 9, 2015 in Geneva, Switzerland.

On 11/5/2015, L'Equipe claimed that the IAAF would cancel the IAAF Awards Gala this year on November 28.

These are sad days for our sport, but if the sport is to survive, the truth must come out. Dick Pound now seems to have the support to get to the bottom of the allegations.

BoysWestLead1000m-FLwest14.jpgFootLocker West, December 2014, photo by PhotoRun.net

Week 21, Day Four, November 5, 2015 Thursday: Fast Day

Warm up, go to the track, run a mile at race pace, jog a mile, then, finish up with six 300 meter cut downs, making each one faster than one before. Have some fun, cooldown with three easy miles.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Tuesday: Tempo Day or...

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Try this: Warm up, go to the track, run three miles on the track, where you jog the turns and sprint the curves. Get the speed going here, have some fun, change some gears, then, cool down for two to three miles.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Fast Day

Warm up, go to the track, run a mile at race pace, jog a mile, then, finish up with six 300 meter cut downs, making each one faster than one before. Have some fun, cooldown with three easy miles.

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, do a long cool down.

Sunday: Easy 7-11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are recovering from the racing.

Kamworor_GeoffreyFV_WXC11.jpgGeoffrey Kamworor, WXC, photo by PhotoRun.net

Geoffrey Kamworor built his strength from a fine cross country back ground. In 2014, he won the World Half Marathon Champs. In 2015, he won the World Cross Country and the silver medal in the World Champs 10,000 meters. Last Sunday, Geoffrey took second in the NYC Marathon. Cross country builds better distance runners.

Week 21, Day Three, November 4, 2015, Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Tuesday: Tempo Day or...

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Try this: Warm up, go to the track, run three miles on the track, where you jog the turns and sprint the curves. Get the speed going here, have some fun, change some gears, then, cool down for two to three miles.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Fast Day

Warm up, go to the track, run a mile at race pace, jog a mile, then, finish up with six 300 meter cut downs, making each one faster than one before. Have some fun, cooldown with three easy miles.

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, do a long cool down.

Sunday: Easy 7-11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are recovering from the racing.

TrackTown-USout15.jpgTracktown USA, photo by PhotoRun.net

Nice to see a new series being covered by ESPN for the sport of athletics. Curious to see how the system will work out.

LV_14_MoneyShot.jpgThe RNR Las Vegas starting line, by Ryan Bethke

The Las Vegas Strip is what people the world over see as Vegas in their dreams. RNR Las Vegas is a wonderful example of finding an iconic city, developing an event that is unique to the community and how many runners are looking for something fun!

Nice to see Geico getting involved in the event. Their commercials make me laugh.

Keitany-TufaH-NYC15-NYC15.JPGThe battle for New York, photo by PhotoRun.net

The last miles, or last meters of a race are where victories are made. Your training is what makes the difference, as well as your ability to stay focused. It is the same in the New York City marathon, or a fall cross country race in Indiana--it all comes down to who wants it more and who can perform at the end of the race.

Week 21, Day Two, November 3, Tuesday: Tempo Day or...

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Try this: Warm up, go to the track, run three miles on the track, where you jog the turns and sprint the curves. Get the speed going here, have some fun, change some gears, then, cool down for two to three miles.

Tuesday: Tempo Day or...

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Try this: Warm up, go to the track, run three miles on the track, where you jog the turns and sprint the curves. Get the speed going here, have some fun, change some gears, then, cool down for two to three miles.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Fast Day

Warm up, go to the track, run a mile at race pace, jog a mile, then, finish up with six 300 meter cut downs, making each one faster than one before. Have some fun, cooldown with three easy miles.

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day 2

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, do a long cool down.

Sunday: Easy 7-11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are recovering from the racing.

VerranzanoNarrows1c-NYC_M15jpg.JPGThe crowd on the Verranzano Narrows, November 1, 2015, photo by PhotoRun.net

On my entrance into the Tavern on the Green on Wednesday, the first person I saw coming out of a taxi was Peter Ciaccia. On my departure on Sunday evening, from the Media Pavilion, the last person I saw, with his medal around his neck, was Micheal Capiraso.

George Hirsch was correct when he said that Mary Wittenberg left the NYRR in better shape than ever, and that Micheal Capiraso and Peter Ciaccia were a seemless transition.

I also believe that Micheal and Peter showed the world that the NYRR meant business and could continue to build on the firm foundation set by Ted Corbit, Fred Lebow, Allan Steinfeld and Mary Wittenberg, to name a few.

Here is Elliott Denman's fine piece on Peter Ciaccia and the vibrancy of the New York Road Runners.

Biwott_StanleyFV-NyMar15.jpgStanley Biwott, photo by PhotoRun.net

Keitany_MaryFinish-NYC15.JPGMary Keitany, photo by PhotoRun.net

As I walked from the finish line around six in the evening on Sunday night, I was taken by how nice and patient everyone was, even in the backed up traffic off Columbus Avenue. I found a cafe, grabbed a coffee and some dinner and people watched for a couple of hours before I headed down to Chelsea and my hotel.

It is now early on Monday and I am finishing our coverage of the 45th New York City Marathon. What a huge success and what a great event.

Here is a fine piece by Chris Lotsbom, for Race Results Weekly. This piece is used with permission.

Biwott-KeitanyFL1-NyMar15.jpgStanley Biwott, Mary Keitany, New York City Marathon Winners, 2015, photo by PhotoRun.net

The New York City Marathon was a huge success on so many levels. The first marathon in many years without Mary Wittenberg at NYRR CEO, it was a fitting testament to the vitality and strength of the New York Road Runners.

The increased activities during the week, the amazing NYRR Media Pavilion, and the fifty thousand runners showed that the New York City Marathon is not sitting on its laurels.

Here is how David Hunter saw the race unfold. David survived our fear and loathing trip to Beijing, and continues to talk to me. I am grateful for that and we are grateful for his weekly column on the sport he so obviously loves.

Thweatt_LauraLeds-NYC15.JPGLaura Thweatt leading NYCM 2015, photo by PhotoRun.net

Laura Thweatt ran a 2:28:23 in her debut marathon on one of the toughest big marathons in the world: New York. The marathon will be her focus in the future, but at this time, Laura will be returning to cross country and the track. A firm foundation in cross country has helped her on the track and in her marathon debut.

Week 21, Day One, November 2, Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: Tempo Day or...

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Try this: Warm up, go to the track, run three miles on the track, where you jog the turns and sprint the curves. Get the speed going here, have some fun, change some gears, then, cool down for two to three miles.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Fast Day

Warm up, go to the track, run a mile at race pace, jog a mile, then, finish up with six 300 meter cut downs, making each one faster than one before. Have some fun, cooldown with three easy miles.

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day 2

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, do a long cool down.

Sunday: Easy 7-11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are recovering from the racing.

Thweatt_LauraLeds-NYC15.JPGLaura Thweatt, photo by PhotoRun.net

The marathon is a jealous mistress. Show her a lack of respect, and she will make you go from strong to weak to laying on the side of the road.

Laura Thweatt is a strong cross country runner, with a background of endurance training. That she ran one run of two hours, thirty minutes is not the important observation. The key here is that, with coach Lee Troop, Laura Thweatt has found a program that works for her. Her debut over the marathon distance gave her the seventh best performance EVER by an American in the big Apple.

And now, Laura Thweatt will focus on club cross country and going back to the track, where she considers herself at 10,000 meter specialist.

The marathon will wait until 2019, thank you.

Here is a fine piece on Laura Thweatt and her future in distance running.

Emily Infeld won the only medal for Americans, male or female, above 400 meters in Beijing. Her spirited finish was one of the most amazing moments of the Beijing World Champs. The women's 10,000 meters with their third, fourth and sixth finishes for the U.S. was one of the most human moments of the World Champs. In her exhaustion at the end of the 10,000 meters, Molly Huddle celebrated one meter early. In her focus at the end of the 10,000 meters, Emily Infeld just dug in and ran through the finish. In her return to a focus on the track, Shalane Flanagan ran one of her best 10,000 meter races in years.

This was the perfect storm. For Emily Infeld, it was the moment of a lifetime, where the coaching of Jerry Schumacher, the advice of Shalane Flanagan, and the frustrations of times, good and bad, came together. That is why we believe, at RunBlogRun, Emily Infeld gets out RBR Athlete of the Month for August 2015. A race of true grit, a race full of emotions, but, in the end, Emily Infeld earned her bronze medal by giving it her all that day.

Emily Infeld will treasure that day, full of human emotions, and full of what makes our sport, at certian moments, so thrilling. Really wonderful people, who have trained all of their young lives, for one or two moments, and when those moments come, with emotion, sweat, and clarity, the honesty is almost overwhelming.

Such was the women's 10,000 meters for those of us at RunBlogRun and the Shoe Addicts.

Infeld_EmilyFL-World15.jpgEmily Infeld, photo by PhotoRun.net

Keitany_MaryFV-NyMar15.jpgMary Keitany, photo by PhotoRun.net

Biwott_StanleyFV-NyMar15.jpgStanley Biwott, photo by PhotoRun.net

On a cool, tailwindy day, Stanley Biwott and Mary Keitany brought their A games. They won in great style and made wonderful television. The New York Road Runners upped their game with their expansive media pavilion and great work conditions, getting one of their largest multi media coverages of their 35 years. RunBlogRun did a four minute stint on BBC Sports world radio for reprise of the great races!

Biwott and Keitany
NEW YORK (USA, Nov 1): Mary Keitany successfully defended her title at the 39th TCS New York City Marathon, while Stanley Biwott made it a Kenyan double, for the third consecutive year, in claiming his first major marathon title. Both races had large packs, with the women's leading group whittled down by a series of surges and the men's pack blown apart by decisive moves. Portugal's Sara Moreira led for large portions of the race, but it was Keitany who reduced the pack to eight as she led during the 25th kilometre. Moreira wasn't done and she pushed ahead again, but the Portuguese athlete couldn't make a decisive break. That move was made by Keitany after 30km as she led a group of three others athletes (Aselefech Mergia, Tigist Tufa and Priscah Jeptoo) away, with Moreira trailing behind. Mergia lost contact at 34km with Jeptoo also falling back. By 35km, Keitany was all by herself and she went on to win in 2:24:25 (1:12:56/1:11:29). Ethiopians Mergia (2:25:32) and Tufa (2:25:50) also made it onto the podium, with Mergia making up a lot of ground in the final miles to catch her compatriot. Moreira backed up her third place finish from last year with fourth place finish this time in 2:25:43. European Marathon champion Christelle Daunay of France moved up the field in the later stages to finish 5th in 2:26:57. Jeptoo went the other direction, fading to 2:27:03. In seventh was the top American, Laura Thweatt in 2:28:23 on her debut. Jelena Prokopcuka of Latvia (2:28:46), Anna Incerti of Italy (2:33:13) and Boston Marathon champion Caroline Rotich of Kenya (2:33:19) completed the top ten. In the men's race, world cross country and half marathon champion Geoffrey Kamworor of Kenya surged to bring three others away at about 20 miles. Stanley Biwott and Lelisa Desisa stayed with him, but defending champion Wilson Kipsang was unable to keep with the leading three. At kilometre 38, Biwott made a big surge, that none of his rivals could match. He went on to win in 2:10:23, ahead of Kamworor (2:10:48) and Desisa (2:12:10). Kipsang ran 2:12:45, his slowest marathon finish ever, for fourth. Yemane Tsegay of Ethiopia was 5th in 2:13:24, one place ahead of Japan's frequent marathoner Yuki Kawauchi (2:13:29). As in the women's race, the top American finished 7th: Meb Keflezighi in 2:13:32. Craig Leon of the USA (2:15:16), Birhanu Kemal of Ethiopia (2:15:40) and Kevin Chelimo of Kenya (2:15:49) completed the top ten.

Keflezighi_Meb-Boston15.jpgMeb Keflizighi, photo by PhotoRun.net

Meb Keflezighi is on a roll.

The 2004 Olympic silver medalist at the marathon, winner of both Boston (2014) and New York (2009) still enjoys his running and he is competitive.

This year, Meb took seventh, and was in the race until 20-21 miles, when Geoffrey Kamworor dropped a 4:24 mile.

Meb hung on for seventh, and a new American record of 2:13:22.

I spoke to Meb after the race, post interview as he was stretching and he was looking pretty darn good. " I might have a little blister, but I feel pretty good. My legs are little tight."

stanley biwott 3.jpgFoto: Timothy Clary/AFP, from Instagram by Jornada

After developing a reputation for being an athlete with talent, but one who resided in the patina of top marathon runners, Stanley Biwott brought himself into the top seats with his gutty, determined and masterful win in the city that never sleeps, New York City today.

In yet the second of three World Marathon Major races this fall that no longer use pace makers, the race developed organically, giving the viewer a chance to have a cup of coffee and see many more of the athletes than one normally sees in such a prestigious race.

There was a strong story for Americans this year as well.

Meb Keflezighi continous to astound, adding a new American masters and New York City Masters course records with his fine seventh place. Craig Leon ran what was the best tactical race of his career, if it was not a personal best, with his eighth place.

But, when the pace got hot, late in the race, Stanley Biwott, Geoffrey Kamworor, Lelisa Desisa and Wilson Kipsang were there! With a 4:41 mile from Kipsang in mile 19, the field was down to four.

And then, the racing really began....

Thweatt_LauraH-VaBeach15.jpgLaura Thweatt, photo by PhotoRun.net

Laura Thweatt is running the NYC Marathon on Sunday. Her background as an accomplished cross country runner should help her in her marathon debut. The biggest thing in your marathon debut? Patience, patience, patience.

Week 20, Day Seven, October 31, 2015, Sunday: Easy 7-11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are recovering from the racing.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: Hard Day

Here are three options for this day of the week:

1. Race Day

a. Warm up, with one to two miles, and some stride outs, 5k race, then, one of the following:

1. Tempo Run, 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:00 for a 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:20 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month. Finish up with 6 x 300 meters, with 100 meter jog in between, and then, long cooldown, 2-3 miles.

2. Go to your conference meet course, warm up, run the course like this: run the first mile at race pace, jog half mile, run hard half mile, jog half mile, run last half mile of course hard, cooldown.

3. Warm up, 3 x mile @ 5k race pace, half mile jog, 4x200 meters on track, 90 percent effort, cooldown.

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Thursday: Race Day 1

1. Race Day, warm up well, some strideouts, 5k race, cool down a bit, then, one of the following:

a. Hill work, 1-mile warmup; 9 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start; repeat 8 times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds and then do your 1-mile easy cool-down.

2. Warm up, go to track, 12 times 400 meters at 5k race pace, 200 meter jog, finish with 4x 300 meters, at finish speed pace, cooldown.

3. Warm up, 3 miles on track, 200 meters, race pace, 200 meters moderate pace, repeat 12 times, cooldown.

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Saturday: Race Day 2

Warm up, then, 5K race. After race, try one of the following:

1. Run the race course again, run three minutes hard, three minutes easy, three times, cooldown.

2. Run an easy four miles, then, go three hundred meters from finish, and practice, six times.

3. Run 5k course, first mile take easy, increase pace in second mile, run final mile at race pace, finish hard, cooldown.

Sunday: Easy 7-11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. Depending on how they feel from this week, the key is that they will be tired and their bodies are recovering from the racing.

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