2019 Dubai IPC Diary: All you wanted to know about the 100 metres but were afraid to ask!

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Hannah Cockcroft T34.jpgHannah Cockcroft, photo and copyright by IPC

Stuart Weir wants you, kind reader, to understand the vagaries of the IPC 100 meters (metres).

Brent Lakatos T53.jpgBrent Lakatos, photo and copyright by IPC

All you wanted to know about the 100 metres and were afraid to ask.

The 100 metres is often the highlight of a track and field meet. It is over quickest and the winner takes the title of the fastest man or woman in the world, the country, the county etc. Who is the fastest human? In IAAF circles, based on the Doha 2019 World Championships, the question is easy to answer: Christian Coleman and Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce, winners of the 100m. But the process is more complicated in the IPC World Championships as there are 32 different 100 metres races in 17 different classifications for men and 15 for women. For the record there is no T33 (cerebral palsy) and no T51 (wheelchair) 100m for women, officially because there are not enough elite women in these classifications to make the events competitive. 32 seems a lot but as Chairman of London 2017, Ed Warner, said - 100 metres races are exciting and whatever session you come you have a good chance of seeing one!

Having thirty-two separate 100 metres races certainly makes for a long programme and arguably cheapens a gold medal when an event goes straight to a final as there are not enough competitors to require heats or semi-finals. But it is the only way to place athletes in a fair competition where everyone has a chance. There is even an argument that there are not enough categories to guarantee that level playing field.

Of course, you can compare times and choose the fastest Para athlete. It tends to be between amputee and visual impairment. I am a little hesitant to pick out the fastest and suggest that they are the best, as all of the winners have done incredibly well and their time is in relation to their disability. The following two tables show the list of 2019 100m world champions by classification and then by finishing time. The fastest para athletes are Petrucio Ferreira dos Santos and Omara Durand - one with visual impairment and one amputee to show again that neither category is entirely dominant.

MEN

Class

Description

Name

Country

Time

T11

Visual impairment

Lucas Prado

BRA

10.95

T12

Visual impairment

Salum Kashafli

NOR

10.54

T13

Visual impairment

Jason Smyth

IRE

10.54

T33

Athetosis etc wheelchair

Ahmad Almutairi

KUW

17.08

T34

Athetosis etc wheelchair

Walid Ktila

TUN

14.99

T35

Cerebral palsy etc

Ihor Tsietov

UKR

12.19

T36

Cerebral palsy etc

James Turner

AUS

11.72

T37

Cerebral palsy etc

Andrei Vdovin

RUS

11.18

T38

Cerebral palsy etc

Dening Zhu

CHN

11.00

T47

Arm Amputee

Petrucio Ferreira dos Santos

BRA

10.44

T51

Wheelchair

Toni Piispanen

FIN

20.33

T52

Wheelchair

Raymond Martin

USA

16.88

T53

Wheelchair

Brent Lakatos

CAN

14.59

T54

Wheelchair

Leo Pekka Tahti

FIN

13.97

T63

Amputee

Daniel Wagner

DEN

12.32

T64

Amputee

Johannes Floors

GER

10.60

RR3

Use Tricycle without pedals

Gavin Drysdale

GBR

16.72

WOMEN

Class

Description

Name

Country

Time

T11

Visual impairment

Jerusa Geber dos Santos

BRA

11.80

T12

Visual impairment

Omara Durand

CUB

11.66

T13

Visual impairment

Leilia Adzhametova

UKR

12.19

T34

Athetosis etc wheelchair

Hannah Cockroft

GBR

16.77

T35

Athetosis etc wheelchair

Maria Lyle

GBR

14.62

T36

Cerebral palsy etc

Yiting Shi

CHN

13.62

T37

Cerebral palsy etc

Xiaoyan Wen

CHN

13.2

T38

Cerebral palsy etc

Sophie Hahn

GBR

12.38

T47

Arm Amputee

Brittni Mason

USA

11.89

T53

Wheelchair

Fang Gao

CHN

16.26

T54

Wheelchair

Amanda Kotaja

FIN

16.00

T63

Amputee

Karisma Tiarani

INA

14.72

T64

Amputee

Irmgard Bensusan

USA

12.86

RR3

Use Tricycle without pedals

Hayleigh Haggo

GBR

18.32

In the table above, by noting that the lower the number, the greater the disability within a category, you can see the progression within cerebral palsy, visual impairment and wheelchair - but there are exceptions as there are in some classes simply better athletes than in others.

Class

Gender

Description

Name

Country

Time

T47

Men

Arm Amputee

Petrucio Ferreira dos Santos

BRA

10.44

T12

Men

Visual impairment

Salum Kashafli

NOR

10.54

T13

Men

Visual impairment

Jason Smyth

IRE

10.54

T64

Men

Amputee

Johannes Floors

GER

10.60

T11

Men

Visual impairment

Lucas Prado

BRA

10.95

T38

Men

Cerebral palsy etc

Dening Zhu

CHN

11.00

T37

Men

Cerebral palsy etc

Andrei Vdovin

RUS

11.18

T12

Women

Visual impairment

Omara Durand

CUB

11.66

T36

Men

Cerebral palsy etc

James Turner

AUS

11.72

T11

Women

Visual impairment

Jerusa Geber dos Santos

BRA

11.80

T47

Women

Arm Amputee

Brittni Mason

USA

11.89

T35

Men

Cerebral palsy etc

Ihor Tsietov

UKR

12.19

T13

Women

Visual impairment

Leilia Adzhametova

UKR

12.19

T63

Men

Amputee

Daniel Wagner

DEN

12.32

T38

Women

Cerebral palsy etc

Sophie Hahn

GBR

12.38

T64

Women

Amputee

Irmgard Bensusan

USA

12.86

T37

Women

Cerebral palsy etc

Xiaoyan Wen

CHN

13.20

T36

Women

Cerebral palsy etc

Yiting Shi

CHN

13.62

T54

Men

Wheelchair

Leo Pekka Tahti

FIN

13.97

T53

Men

Wheelchair

Brent Lakatos

CAN

14.59

T35

Women

Athetosis etc wheelchair

Maria Lyle

GBR

14.62

T63

Women

Amputee

Karisma Tiarani

INA

14.72

T34

Men

Athetosis etc wheelchair

Walid Ktila

TUN

14.99

T54

Women

Wheelchair

Amanda Kotaja

FIN

16.00

T53

Women

Wheelchair

Fang Gao

CHN

16.26

RR3

Men

Use Tricycle without pedals

Gavin Drysdale

GBR

16.72

T34

Women

Athetosis etc wheelchair

Hannah Cockroft

GBR

16.77

T52

Men

Wheelchair

Raymond Martin

USA

16.88

T33

Men

Athetosis etc wheelchair

Ahmad Almutairi

KUW

17.08

RR3

Women

Use Tricycle without pedals

Hayleigh Haggo

GBR

18.32

T51

Men

Wheelchair

Toni Piispanen

FIN

20.33

It is no surprise that the six fastest are men but interesting beyond that how the list almost alternates between men and women. The top ten or so times are highly respectable times even for athletes without a disability.

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