World best in women's 2k steeple, by EME News

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Nyambura_VirginiaR-Doha15.JPgVirginia Nyambura, photo by PhotoRun.net

World best in women 2k steeple
BERLIN (GER, Sep 6): The 74th ISTAF Berlin had five fresh world champions, two recorded wins. However it wasn't the newly crowned champions of the world who provided the highlights; fast 800m races, a world best in the women's 2000mSC and a good men's shot were among the top competitions. In the women's 800m, Lynsey Sharp ran 1:57.71, putting her third on Great Britain's all-time list. In second, Fabienne Kohlmann also set a lifetime best, her time of 1:58.34 is the joint second fastest time ever by a German. World champion Marina Arzamasova followed with 1:58.88 while Chanelle Price of the USA also went under 2, running 1:59.99. She was followed by her compatriot Shannon Rowbury (2:00.03 PB), Christina Hering (2:00.04), Joanna Jozwik (2:00.27), Caster Semenya (2:00.51) and Rababe Arafi (2:01.79). In the men's race, Nijel Amos, who didn't make the world final, adopted an uncharacteristic front running style, which proved successful as he won in 1:43.28, nearly a second ahead of world silver medallist Adam Kszczot (1:44.42). 2013 world champion Mohammed Aman (1:44.24), Olympic 1500m champion Taoufik Makhloufi (1:44.24) and Musaeb Balla (1:44.62) took the other top spots. Over the rarely-run 2000mSC, Virginia Nyambura of Kenya set a world all-time best of 6:02.16; in setting the world record in 2008, Gulnara Galkina of Russia went through 2000m in 6:01.20. Kenya went 1-2 with Beatrice Chepkoech clocking 6:02.47 to finish ahead of German world medallist Gesa Krause, who set a national record of 6:04.20. New Zealand's Tom Walsh upstaged home favourite David Storl in the shot, recording 21.47 in the third round. Storl could only respond with 21.19. There was good depth as O'Dayne Richards also went over 21, recording 21.05. In the women's competition, world champion Christina Schwanitz putt 19.66 to secure a German win. The other world champion to record a win was Piotr Malachowski who won the men's discus with 66.13; he had three efforts better than Christoph Harting's 65.15. After vaulting 593 on Friday, Olympic champion Renaud Lavillenie failed to make a height, fouling twice at 554 and then once at 564. World bronze medallist Piotr Lisek took the win with a first attempt clearance of 574, beating Kostas Filippidis, who made that height on his third attempt. Both failed at 581. They were followed by the last three world champions. 2015 World champion Shawn Barber (564), Pawel Wojciechowski (554) and 2013 world champion Raphael Holzdeppe (544). Dawn Harper Nelson got back to winning ways after her fall in Beijing, clocking 12.82 for a narrow win over Sharika Nelvis (12.84). Tiffany Porter ran 12.92 for third ahead of the top finisher in the field from the world championships, Cindy Roleder, who ran 12.95. In the men's 100m, Kim Collins won in 10.13 (1.1) over Isiah Young (10.17) and the French pair of Christophe Lemaitre (10.19) and Jimmy Vicaut (10.21). Candyce McGrone of the USA followed on from her good race in Zurich with 11.11 (0.6) to win the women's 100m. Germany's Verena Sailer ran 11.37 for 5th in her final race before retirement. After winning the 3000mSC at Weltklasse, Paul Koech who was not in Beijing got another win under his belt, running 13:08.86 in the 5000m to beat Americans Hassan Mead (13:10.38) and Bernard Lagat (13:17.58). Marharyta Dorozhon of Israel threw 63.24 to beat Germany's world champion Katharina Molitor (61.19) in the javelin. Germany's Kathrin Klaas was a dominant winner in the women's hammer, throwing 72.09 to American Amber Campbell's best of 70.94. World bronze medallist Ivana Spanovic won the women's long jump with 6.60 (-0.6), while Christabel Nettey got out to 645 (-1.1) for second. Andrew Riley of Jamaica was the men's 110mH winner in a time of 13.40 (-0.1).

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