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Long Runs are critical in your development. The late great Arthur Lydiard had his 800 meter runners doing 100 miles a week; the mature ones that is. Peter Snell, one his first successes, won the 800m in 1960 Olympics and in 1964, won the 800m and 1,500 meters! 

In human terms, cross country running over the summer changed my life. I went from a six minute mile PB to a sub five minute in one season, and dropped 90 seconds off my two mile time in one season. It is about getting fit and enjoying the running. 


Week Seven, Day Seven, the Long Run. August 2, 2015. Sunday:  Easy 9.5-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. (400 Mile: 8.5 miles/300 Mile: 7.5 miles). 


Week 7: Midway Through the Summer

This week is tough. Check your shoes to make sure they aren't too worn. Consider getting racing shoes for the fall and using them for your tempo runs. College runners can start adding a mile to their long runs. Get to 90 minutes to 1:45 in the month of August. 


Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 6x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down. 


Tuesday: 1-mile warmup, 20-min tempo run, 1-mile cool-down. To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. For example: If you currently run 18:50 min for a 5K, that's 6:05 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:35 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month.


Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 6x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.


Thursday: 1-mile warmup, 7 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to start; repeat 6 times, no rests); 1-mile easy cool-down.


Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 6x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down. 


Saturday: Easy 5-mile run. (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: off)


Sunday:  Easy 9.5-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. (400 Mile: 8.5 miles/300 Mile: 7.5 miles). 


Week 7 Total: 500 Mile-40.5 miles; 400 Mile-36.5 miles; 
300 Mile-25.5 miles

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Desi Linden, photo by Kevin Morris

This is Desi Linden. She is the second fastest American EVER at Boston. She took second at Boston. In late July, Desi took silver in the 10,000m at the Pan Am Games. She is training now for a berth on the 2016 US Olympic marathon team. That will be decided in February of 2016 in Los Angeles. 

The summer training program that we put into place is a starting point. The hill runs can be changed to mile repeats over hilly courses. Break up your toughest fall course into three sections or six for that matter, and do repeats of that on Thursdays. Learn the course, know where to move in the fall. 


Week Seven, Day Six, August 1, 2015. Saturday: Easy 5-mile run. (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: off)

Week 7: Midway Through the Summer

This week is tough. Check your shoes to make sure they aren't too worn. Consider getting racing shoes for the fall and using them for your tempo runs. College runners can start adding a mile to their long runs. Get to 90 minutes to 1:45 in the month of August. 


Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 6x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down. 


Tuesday: 1-mile warmup, 20-min tempo run, 1-mile cool-down. To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. For example: If you currently run 18:50 min for a 5K, that's 6:05 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:35 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month.


Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 6x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.


Thursday: 1-mile warmup, 7 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to start; repeat 6 times, no rests); 1-mile easy cool-down.


Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 6x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down. 


Saturday: Easy 5-mile run. (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: off)


Sunday:  Easy 9.5-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. (400 Mile: 8.5 miles/300 Mile: 7.5 miles). 


Week 7 Total: 500 Mile-40.5 miles; 400 Mile-36.5 miles;
300 Mile-25.5 miles


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5,000 meters, Adrian Martinez Classic, June 4, 2015, photo by Kevin Morris

Week Seven has been a hard week. You are now one day from the beginning of August. Sleep eight to nine hours a night, get a nap in afternoon if you can. Stay away from carbonated beverages. Eat well: protein, salads, veggies, keep soda, pizza and desserts at a moderate level. Drink water and green tea. Stay focused on the prize. 

Week Seven, Day Five, July 31, 2015, Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 6x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down. 


Week 7: Midway Through the Summer

This week is tough. Check your shoes to make sure they aren't too worn. Consider getting racing shoes for the fall and using them for your tempo runs. For advanced and college runners, we suggest adding 30-45 minute easy runs on Monday, Wednesday and Friday mornings. 


Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 6x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down. 


Tuesday: 1-mile warmup, 20-min tempo run, 1-mile cool-down. To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. For example: If you currently run 18:50 min for a 5K, that's 6:05 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:35 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month.


Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 6x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.


Thursday: 1-mile warmup, 7 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to start; repeat 6 times, no rests); 1-mile easy cool-down.


Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 6x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down. 


Saturday: Easy 5-mile run. (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: off)


Sunday:  Easy 9.5-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. (400 Mile: 8.5 miles/300 Mile: 7.5 miles). 


Week 7 Total: 500 Mile-40.5 miles; 400 Mile-36.5 miles; 
300 Mile-25.5 miles

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The 800 meters, Adrian Martinez Classic, June 4, 2015, photo by Kevin Morris

The 800 meters is a sadist's race. That perfect combination of speed and endurance. Run cross country in the fall and your 600 meter and 1000 meter racing indoors and 800 meter outdoors will be much better! If you are not bent over after an 800 meters, you just did not run it hard enough. 

Week Seven, Day Four, July 30, 2015. It's the hills! Thursday: 1-mile warmup, 7 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to start; repeat 6 times, no rests); 1-mile easy cool-down.


Week 7: Midway Through the Summer

This week is tough. Check your shoes to make sure they aren't too worn. Consider getting racing shoes for the fall and using them for your tempo runs. For advanced and college runners, we suggest adding 30-45 minute easy runs on Monday, Wednesday and Friday mornings. 


Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 6x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down. 


Tuesday: 1-mile warmup, 20-min tempo run, 1-mile cool-down. To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. For example: If you currently run 18:50 min for a 5K, that's 6:05 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:35 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month.


Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 6x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.


Thursday: 1-mile warmup, 7 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to start; repeat 6 times, no rests); 1-mile easy cool-down.


Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 6x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down. 


Saturday: Easy 5-mile run. (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: off)


Sunday:  Easy 9.5-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. (400 Mile: 8.5 miles/300 Mile: 7.5 miles). 


Week 7 Total: 500 Mile-40.5 miles; 400 Mile-36.5 miles; 
300 Mile-25.5 miles

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Adro Mile, Adrian Martinez Classic, June 4, 2015, photo by Kevin Morris

The mile is a classic distance. Four laps on 400 meter tracks. The most popular distance in high school. The 1600 meters is not a mile. Robbie Andrews leads here! 


Week Seven, Day Three, July 29, 2015, Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 6x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.

Week 7: Midway Through the Summer

This week is tough. Check your shoes to make sure they aren't too worn. Consider getting racing shoes for the fall and using them for your tempo runs. For advanced and college runners, we suggest adding 30-45 minute easy runs on Monday, Wednesday and Friday mornings. 


Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 6x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down. 


Tuesday: 1-mile warmup, 20-min tempo run, 1-mile cool-down. To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. For example: If you currently run 18:50 min for a 5K, that's 6:05 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:35 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month.


Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 6x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.


Thursday: 1-mile warmup, 7 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to start; repeat 6 times, no rests); 1-mile easy cool-down.


Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 6x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down. 


Saturday: Easy 5-mile run. (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: off)


Sunday:  Easy 9.5-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. (400 Mile: 8.5 miles/300 Mile: 7.5 miles). 


Week 7 Total: 500 Mile-40.5 miles; 400 Mile-36.5 miles;
300 Mile-25.5 miles


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Robbie Andrews, photo by Kevin Morris

Robbie Andrews' move in the 1,500m US Champs was amazing! He went from seventh to second in the last 200 meters. His finish was blazing! That does not come from happenstance. Fine kicks are developed. Think about your kicks when you do your stride outs! Dream to race, and dream to do well. 


Week Seven, Day Two, July 28, 2015, Tuesday: 1-mile warmup, 20-min tempo run, 1-mile cool-down. To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. For example: If you currently run 18:50 min for a 5K, that's 6:05 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:35 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month.

Week 7: Midway Through the Summer

This week is tough. Check your shoes to make sure they aren't too worn. Consider getting racing shoes for the fall and using them for your tempo runs. For college and advanced runners, we suggest 30-45 minutes easy running on Monday, Wednesday and Friday mornings. 


Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 6x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down. 


Tuesday: 1-mile warmup, 20-min tempo run, 1-mile cool-down. To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. For example: If you currently run 18:50 min for a 5K, that's 6:05 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:35 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month.


Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 6x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down.


Thursday: 1-mile warmup, 7 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to start; repeat 6 times, no rests); 1-mile easy cool-down.


Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 6x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest in between; cool down. 


Saturday: Easy 5-mile run. (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: off)


Sunday:  Easy 9.5-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. (400 Mile: 8.5 miles/300 Mile: 7.5 miles). 


Week 7 Total: 500 Mile-40.5 miles; 400 Mile-36.5 miles; 
300 Mile-25.5 miles

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The London Olympic Stadium, repurposed, July 2015, photo by PhotoRun.net

When Beren Cross and I chatted on Saturday, we were discussing stories for that day and the next. While my editorial standards are sacrosanct (otherwise, the late James Dunaway visits me in my dreams), I do give my writers much freedom. 

Beren Cross was to write two pieces, on on Dina Asher-Smith and one on the Legacy of the London Olympic stadium. 

Here is the second. 

I think that he did a fine job. 
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About three years ago, Creigh Kelly, a man I hold in high esteem, wrote me about a guy he knew who he thought might be a nice addition to my writing team. 

Now, as the publisher of a group of media sites, and magazines, I hear things like this everyday. Truth is, not everyone can write well. 

It is one of my biggest issues about the modern media world. Not everyone can write well. It is a talent that must be honed. 

As a favor to Mr. Kelly I gave this guy a phone call and we chatted a few minutes. David Hunter was (per my notes that day), "affable, good sense of humor, a bit of  a track geek, let's give him a shot. "

So, I gave David Hunter a shot. 

Best decision I have made in past few years. 

When the late James Dunaway edited him, I was shocked that his normal derision of my attempts at finding new writers was only half strength. Was it the end times? Nope, Hunter was pretty good at this writing thing. 

Over the past four years, I have worked with David Hunter nearly every week of the year. His observations on the sport, and his enthusiasm and his obvious love of the sport come through with our readers. Hunter's pieces also do well on our blog, RunBlogRun.com and in our pubs, Athletes Only, Missouri Runner, Coaching Athletics and American Track & Field

For David Hunter, this was a second career. After a career in banking and the legal profession, Hunter should have taken off on some long cruises and perhaps Miami. Yet, now, David and his lovely wife  head to track meets, in the US, and Europe. 

In a few weeks, David Hunter and I will be in Beijing, as we cover the sport for you on RunBlogRun. 

While David has come a long way in his writing, his real love and talent, I believe, is Track and Field announcing. David Hunter has developed into a fine announcer, announcing Collegiate Indoor Championships, the Jesse Owens Meet in Columbus, the Millrose Games and this past USA Outdoor, David Hunter did the 20 Kilometer Race Walk Champs. His knowledge of the sport is second to none, but it his attention to detail and his obvious enjoyment of announcing the sport is key. And face it, anyone who can make the 20k race walk exciting deserves at least high praise.

David Hunter has taken his avocation, writing and announcing about the sport he loves and made it his vocation. 

The job of an announcer is to provide more interest in the event that they are announcing to the fans. A good announcer captures the fans with their additional information and insight into the event. A great announcer is a master storyteller, who brings the fan along with them, for the ride of their life as they watch a fine day of track and field. 

David Hunter is a great announcer. David Hunter is a great story teller. 

In the video below, you can get a good feel of David Hunters' talents!


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The return to the Olympic Stadium was why I was at the London DL. I wanted to see how the newly repurposed stadium could house football and athletics. In recent years, football stadiums in Europe have gone up without any access for athletics. Seb Coe put his foot down on this one, and part of the London 2012 legacy is this stadium. 

Well, Seb Coe was right. 

The stadium is perfect. On Friday night,under absolutely cold and windy conditions (early on, rain), the crowd of 30-35,000 were treated to wins by Usain Bolt and Mo Farah. 

On Saturday, the magic happened. 

Dina Asher-Smith won her 100 meter semi in 10.99, making the young Briton the first GBR woman under eleven seconds! 

Two minutes later, in the long jump, 
Shara Proctor leaped 6.98 meters on her last jump, breaking her
British record! 

And the British men won the 4x100 meter relay! 

Some fine races, and some great, great competitions. 

After having seen pace making at its best in Monaco, in London it was about great racing, like Nijel Amos and David Rudisha. Like Laura Weightmann and Gabby Grunewald. Like Asbel Kiprop and Matthew Centrowitz leading fifteen men under 4 minutes in the iconic Emsley Carr Mile! 

After the stadium quieted down on Saturday, July 25, in a silent stadium, I recorded my thoughts on this lovely weekend of Track & Field.

I hope that you like it. 



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Kyle Merber, HOKA ONE ONE athlete, photo by Kevin Morris

HOKA ONE ONE has developed a fine running business over the past several years by doing it old school: support for American athletes, support for events, support for coaches clinics all the while building fine performance running shoes. 

An example of their fine programming is the HOKA ONE ONE Endurance Crossroads Clinic, to be held at Sacramento City College on August 15, 2015. If you can get there, be there! 

All the info is below as well as on the pdf we have linked right here! 2015 Endurance Crossroads Clinic flyer CROSS-6.pdf

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