Arzamasova_MarinaFH-World15.JPgWorld Champs 800m, photo by PhotoRun.net

Look at the picture above. A year's worth of hard training, built up over 12-14 years of prior training, comes down to a lean, and final kick, a desperate last run. You build up the endurance to hold on at the end of a race over months and years. Your ability to handle the repetition work, speed work, all comes from the miles you did in the cross country season.

September 1, 2015, Week 12, Day 2, Tuesday: 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, Fartlek session, 1-mile cool down. To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:30 for a 5K now, that means a 6:00 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:30 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month.

Fartlek, 30 minutes, two minutes @5k pace, one minute relaxed, times ten

One Mile Cooldown

Week 12: Here Comes Cross Country Season

High school cross country starts quickly, so use those early races to get into shape. Continue to build speed. 300 Mile athletes add a Saturday run.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, Fartlek session, 1-mile cool down. To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:30 for a 5K now, that means a 6:00 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:30 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month.

Fartlek, 30 minutes, two minutes @5k pace, one minute relaxed, times ten

One Mile Cooldown

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Thursday: 1-mile warmup; 8 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start. Repeat 7 more times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging back to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds.

Repetions, Five minutes hard, @5k pace, Five minutes relaxed, time three.

1-mile easy cool-down.

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Saturday: Easy 3-mile run. (400 Mile: 2 miles/300 Mile: 2 miles)

Sunday: Easy 11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. (400 Mile: 8 miles/300 Mile: 7 miles).

Week 12 Total: 500 Mile-53 miles; 400 Mile-37 miles; 300 Mile-29 miles

Mo. 2 Total (To Date): 500 Mile-199 (487.5) miles; 400 Mile-133.5 (383.5) miles; 300 Mile-103.5 (193.5) miles

Alan Abrahamson writes 3Wiresports.com on global sports. His column on the mixed fortunes of the U.S. team in Beijing makes some very strong points.

I would like to make a few others:

We seem to be at a changing of the guard in our sport.

There was a dearth of success in historically important events (hurdles, sprints, jumps).

There was success among athletes coached by long time successful coaches: Gold: (Joe Kovacs-Art Venegas), (Christian Taylor-Rana Reider), (Allyson Felix-Bobby Kersee), (Tianna Bartoletta, Loren Seagrave), Men's 4x400m relay team, Silver: Women's 4x100m, Women's 4x400m relay, Shamier Litte (Pat Henry), LaShawn Merritt (Brooks Johnson), (Justin Gatlin-Dennis Mitchell), Bronze: Cassandra Tate, Michelle Carter (Micheal Carter), Emily Infeld (Jerry Schumacher)

The relay system does not seem to be working. Some of top athletes missing from relay pools, yet others, perhaps past their best, are included.

Let us find a system that works. No blame game, that has not worked.

In any event, 18 medals is a big difference from 30 medals, as has been suggested is a proper goal.

It could have been the perfect storm, overtraining at camps, improved competition and training by other countries.

This is a global sport.

In any case, USATF has taken great pains to show us that the investment from Nike is good with the sport. I applaud the influx of revenues.

Max Siegel is CEO. He has taken the mantle of responsbility for the sport, and as such, I believe, he needs to hold an inquiry into what happened in Beijing.

A meeting of the minds.

He is the man for the task. As CEO, that is his job.

The good stuff and the hard stuff.

Right now, USATF needs to think about the lessons that should be learned from Beijing.

Otherwise, they will be repeated in Rio.

Arzamosova_MarinaFH-Beijing15.JPGWC 800 meter final, photo by PhotoRun.net

800 meters is the perfect combination of speed and endurance. Want to be a great 800 meter runner? Run cross country. The fall season helps you become stronger, and the tempo work helps you with the mid part of the race.

August 31, 2015, Week 12, Day 1, Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Week 12: Here Comes Cross Country Season

High school cross country starts quickly, so use those early races to get into shape. Continue to build speed. 300 Mile athletes add a Saturday run.

Monday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Tuesday: 1-mile warmup; 20-min tempo run, Fartlek session, 1-mile cool down. To determine your tempo run pace, add a half-minute to your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:30 for a 5K now, that means a 6:00 pace. Add 30 seconds to get your tempo run pace of 6:30 per mile. Recalculate your pace as your fitness improves, about once a month.

Fartlek, 30 minutes, two minutes @5k pace, one minute relaxed, times ten

One Mile Cooldown

Wednesday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 4 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Thursday: 1-mile warmup; 8 hill repeats (run 200 yds uphill, turn, jog downhill to the start. Repeat 7 more times, no rests); on the flat at the bottom of the hill, try for 8x150 yds as easy strideouts, jogging back to the start, no rest in between; 1-mile easy cool-down. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10x150 yds.

Repetions, Five minutes hard, @5k pace, Five minutes relaxed, time three.

1-mile easy cool-down.

Friday: Warm up; 6-mile run (400 Mile: 5 miles/300 Mile: 3 miles); 8x150 yds relaxed strideouts on grass, jogging back to the start after each, no rest between; cool down.

Saturday: Easy 3-mile run. (400 Mile: 2 miles/300 Mile: 2 miles)

Sunday: Easy 11-mile run on grass or dirt with friends. (400 Mile: 8 miles/300 Mile: 7 miles).

Week 12 Total: 500 Mile-53 miles; 400 Mile-37 miles; 300 Mile-29 miles

Mo. 2 Total (To Date): 500 Mile-199 (487.5) miles; 400 Mile-133.5 (383.5) miles; 300 Mile-103.5 (193.5) miles

Jamaica4x1Intro-Beijing15.JPGJamaican 4x100m relay team, photo by PhotoRun.net

So, David Hunter gets the hard stuff to do.

He had to, on Saturday, go into the mixed zone and stir it up with the relay teams, and see if he could find some fun comments. Remember, this was done on Saturday. We are posting on Sunday.

Jamaica predicted their 4x400m women's win. Martyn Rooney, GBR, predicted his team on the podium, and there are some fun other comments as well!

Eaton_AshtonDiscBookW-Beijing15.JPGAshton Eaton, 43.34m Discus throw, photo by PhotoRun.net

Ashton Eaton's WR has a back story. Here is the behind the scenes story, by Alex Mills, on all the drama, emotion, training and love that go into such an effort.

It is a fascinating story...

565940809_CP_9301_431F1A84DE1106D64DCBD461A148B5B3.JPGUS and Jamaican teams, after the 4x100m relay, photo by Getty Images for IAAF

The relays are fun.

The relays are infuriating.

Tonight, as I was heading for a water and a coffee, I met Dina Asher-Smith, the new young British sprinter who has the British NRs at 100m (10.99) and 200 meters (NR of 22.07). She broke Kathy Cooks' British record for 200 meters from 1984 in the final. "The race was fast, and I was not sure I was doing well, as I saw the girls in front of me." Dina has captured the hearts of the British media as have her relay team mates, who have broken NR three times, this 4x100m in placing fourth!

Oh, and Dina knows RunBlogRun--"it is that yellow blog, right?"

Stuart Weir wrote this piece. I am quite excited to have Stuart writing for us. He has a wry sense of humor and he enjoys the sport as well.

This is his final column for the World Champs.

He will be joining our team for Zurich (Alex Mills and Cathal Dennehy at Zurich and Brussells, I am off to the former colonies, aka U.S.A.).

ChinaMen4x1Q-Beijing15.JPGChinese 4x100m silver medal wining relay team, 38.01, photo by PhotoRun.net

For Jeff Benjamin, and millions of US track fans, their recourse is NBC and Universal, as the live streaming of the IAAF meet is blocked in the U.S. (not sure on that one, but another way it is harder to view global athletics in U.S.)

Here is Jeff Benjamin's review of Day 8.

A special thanks to Jeff Benjamin's wife and daughters, who, while they are track fans, have to watch a lot of track and field, sometimes!

Eaton_AshtonWR-Beijing15.JPGAshton Eaton, WR 9045, photo by PhotoRun.net

Ashton Eaton broke his world record due to his 1,500m run. His record came down to running the 1,500m .73 of a second under his needed time!

Here is Alfons Juck, of EME News on the notable and quotable for day 8.

That Ashton Eaton is indeed the Greatest Athlete on Earth is part of a tradtion that dates back to the 1912 Olympics. After watching the decathlon and pentathlon (with LJ, Javelin, 200m, Discus, 1,500m run), both won by Jim Thorpe, the King of Sweden was noted to have said, " You are the Greatest athlete on Earth." Hence, the tradition.

Eaton_Ashton1500W-Beijing15.JPGAshton Eaton, enroute to WR of 9045, August 28-29, 2015, photo by PhotoRun.net

Aston Eaton set a WR in 2012 at the Olympic Trials in front of the late Milt Campbell, Bill Toomey, Bruce Jenner, Rafer Johnson, four of the five American decathlon kings who preceded him. In 2015, in Beijing, Ashton Eaton broke that WR, with five events with bigger scores than 2012, and five events with less.

Here is Elliott Denman's piece on Ashton Eaton, the World's Greatest Athlete, and, for my part, one of the classiest human beings on the planet.

Congrats to Ashton Eaton, his wife, Brianne Theisen Eaton and their coach, Harry Marra, one of the grand veteran coaches of our sport.

Dibaba_MareFV-Worlds15.jpgMare Dibaba wins the marathon! photo by PhotoRun.net

The women's marathon I began watching at 1:17 into the race. I had spent the previous hour with the Chinese police (story on that Monday), filing a report on counterfiting experience. That last 1:09 of the race was fantastic, as the race unfolded.

Here is

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