Usain Bolt Interview, Unabridged, courtesy of IAAF

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In my travels, I have met some amazing athletes, great coaches and thoughtful agents. Ricky Simms of Pace Management, kindly provided me, just as he said, with the full transcript of the Usain Bolt interview, done just after his world record. I had met up with Ricky at the Nike Pre meeting, and in passing asked about an interview with Usain Bolt. He told me that the major interview had been completed a few days before, but if I was interested, he could find for me a recording of the interview, done for the IAAF on June 3.

Good to his word, Ricky emailed me the proceedings, which appear here, with some minor corrections. Please enjoy!

I did not want to change a word, as I felt that Mr. Bolt, who is not verbose, answered the questions posed in a pretty straightforward manner.

The main questioner is Chris Turner, IAAF Web Editorial Director, and a total javelin geek. Several other reporters are in the mix, Paul Gains among them. Jean Cherry, is Gene Cherry of Reuters.

Also brilliant coverage by the IAAF on the record at www.iaaf.org!

Read, sit back and enjoy!

IAAF 3rd June 2008

Duration: 00:42:06

Participants

• Chris Turner

• Usian Bolt

Operator: Thank you for standing by and welcome to IAAF conference call. At this time all participants are in listen only mode. There will be a presentation followed by a question and answer session at which time if you wish to ask a question you will need to press *1 on your telephone. I must advise you that his conference is being recorded today, Tuesday 3rd June 2008. I would now like to hand the conference over to your speaker today, Mr Chris Turner. Please go ahead sir.

Chris Turner: Thank you very much. Welcome everybody, Chris Turner from IAAF; most of you know me already. And most importantly welcome and many congratulations to you Usain Bolt, to you and your coach, and from all the World’s Media congratulations Usain, just say hello for everybody, would you, just very quickly.

Usain Bolt: Hello, thanks very much.

Chris Turner: Now, it has been a long road since 2002 in Kingston, when you became World Junior Champion; not just World Junior Champion but the youngest ever World Junior Champion. This Saturday, New York at 21 years old you broke the World 100m record, it is perhaps easy for all of us to forget how young you are still. Now you have had your fair share of injuries during that time. Was there ever a moment when you felt you just might not quite get to the topmost grade as a senior athlete?

Usain Bolt: No. Not really doubt but you worry a little bit. For two years I had injuries but when I joined the Glen Mills’ camp it changed dramatically because he handled me so well and I started doing well immediately. So, it was a little bit of worry but not really doubt.

Chris Turner: You spoke there about injuries and I am sure you won't mind given how much you have transformed recently but I know there was some accusations, particularly in the last few years that you were partying too much, you weren’t taking the sport too seriously. Now, if I can take you briefly back to your National 200m record last year, when you improved on Quarrie’s legendary mark, you ran 19.75, and I did some research, went back on to our site and read the remarks you made to our correspondent then, Paul Reed, and you basically said the days of clowning are gone; I felt it was time to get serious. Now, you have obviously succeeded in that, you have got the World Silver Medal at 200m from last year and now the World 100m record. What caused that change in attitude?

Usain Bolt: Well, you grow up; you see the bigger picture I would say. I have been running for a couple of years leading up to the National Trials and I have seen that it is a lot of work, hard work and dedication needed to become one of the best. So I decided well it is time because I have been on the circuit and I have seen what I have to do to become one of the best, so I decided well it is time that I change my ways; change a little, not everything, change a little things in my personal life to really accomplish what I have accomplished so far now.

Chris Turner: And you very much accomplished something now, and not in the most ideal conditions; the weather on Saturday was at its best, a very wet track which has come straight after a thunderstorm. Now, we all know that a thunderstorm can clear the air but did you sense anything in the atmosphere there because it was literally electric before the start of the race, because it is an instinctive sport isn't it, particularly sprinting; it is the mood of the moment, the twitch of the muscles. Do you have any anticipation, obviously not the World Record, maybe you did, but did you feel anything particularly special was going to occur?

Usain Bolt: No, actually I ran in Trinidad two weeks before and I said to my coach earlier that, because my race in Trinidad wasn’t so good when I ran 9.92 so I said to my coach well if I get the good weather I think I can break the World Record work, and he said oh well don’t worry about that. And just to perform at your best ability. So, I just went out there and just did my best.

Chris Turner: And what a best you did as well. Now, you mentioned your coach there, Glen Mills, you have been based at the IAAF High Performance Training Centre in Kingston; they have basically been the foundations of your success. Now we all laughed a little bit, I am sure you saw the irony that Glen has been a little bit reluctant for you to run the 100m preferring you to stick to 200 or perhaps in the future 4; but you felt, considered yourself a better 200m runner. What can we expect from this year from your 200m – let's not think about Beijing for the moment, let's just talk about improvement. As we have already said you have the National Record at 19.75.

Usain Bolt: I really look forward to my 200m every season because I have been working hard on my 200m for years now. I have worked hard because I have done a lot of training. I have done a tremendous amount of work so I really look forward to my 200 every year, and this year is no different. I am just going to work hard because I want to be one of the best 200m runners ever; I have been working hard this year definitely to become one of the best.

Chris Turner: Now you have walked into that question, because obviously I have to quickly ask you – Michael Johnson’s record 19.32 is that in danger?

Usain Bolt: Well, I don’t know, I don’t make predictions until after I run. I can’t say, I always wait until the first 200 then I say what time I think I can do for the year.

Chris Turner: Very sensible, not making predictions. I have got to ask you the last question before we throw it over to all of the journalists we have n line today. You said the work you have been doing over the years. Now your start on Saturday was absolutely phenomenal, the key to your race. Did you immediately know you have got a good one or is 9.72 seconds just too quick to remember specifically anything?

Usain Bolt: I knew I had a good start, I could feel it from the start. I was happy with myself because I have been working hard, especially on my start because that was my weak point. I have been working hard on that, so I knew exactly from out of the blocks I got a good start.

Chris Turner: Excellent. Okay. For the moment just hold on line Usain; we go back to the operator and I think we can begin the interactive session now.

Operator: Hello there, if you wish to ask a question please press *1 on your telephone and wait for your name to be announced. If you wish to cancel your request please press the # key. Your first question today comes from David Martin. Please ask your question.

David Martin: Usain, obviously the 100 was a tremendous performance but how do you feel about attacking the World 200m, it has lasted for a very long time now. Can you beat Michael Johnson’s mark do you think in the next couple of years?

Usain Bolt: Well, I am not sure; I said earlier I am going to wait until I run my first 200 for the…

[Interruption]

David Martin: Sorry Usain, can you get Johnson’s record do you think?

Usain Bolt: As I said I am waiting on my first one, I don’t go for records. My coach said don’t worry, I just go there to train, I train and then I go to perform so this season I am just really looking forward to the 200. I am not sure, maybe if I run fast enough I may think about it, but I am not really worried about that right now.

David Martin: Thanks for you that Usain.

Operator: Your next question today comes from Philipp Vandeweyer. Please ask your question.

Philipp Vandeweyer: Hello Usain, I am calling from Brussels, Belgium. Next to the admiration we all have for your performance I want to congratulate you again for this. We have had a lot of emails from our readers this weekend that are doubting the time and the performance after all the scandals that have marred the 100m these last few years. What would you like to say to them?

Usain Bolt: Well I have been running good since I was 15, so this is no surprise to me. I am sure it is no surprise to a lot of people because I have been doing this from when I was young. I have been doing tremendous things from when I was young. So, this is no surprise to a lot of people. So I just would like to say just me being on top, getting back on top I would say.

Philipp Vandeweyer: Yes, but do you realise that the heritage is quite heavy?

Usain Bolt: Well, yes, but I am not really worried about that because I know that I just go there and perform at the best of my ability at all times.

Philipp Vandeweyer: Thank you.

Operator: Your next question today comes from Paul Gains. Please ask your question.

Paul Gains: Congratulations Usain. When we spoke a couple of weeks ago you said that you weren’t decided whether you were gong to do the 100m in Beijing or not. I understand you have now made the decision to do both the 100 and 200; if so when was that decision made?

Usain Bolt: Well, I said that but my coach said that he still hasn’t decided, but I have been doubling my trials, to keep my options open, so I am not sure exactly what I will be doing but I may…we’re leaning towards deciding that I may be doubling but I am not sure as yet.

Paul Gains: So it is the 200 for sure, possibly the double.

Usain Bolt: Yes, 200 for sure, yes.

Paul Gains: Running 9.72 so early in the season, it is only June – are you afraid of perhaps peaking so soon, too soon, and if not how much faster could you go?

Usain Bolt: Well, I am not worried about peaking because my training was geared, you start with some 100, this is for my speed work and then I am starting 200 training actually this week, the next week, so I will be doing some speed and endurance. So I am sure I am not at the top of my game yet because I haven’t done my 200 training as yet, so I have some speed and endurance to do, and to sharpen up and stuff, so I am not at the top of my game. Right now, I am not worried about going any faster now that I have the World Record, so I don’t need to break it.

Paul Gains: Thank you Usain.

Operator: Your next question today comes from Rick Broadbent. Please ask your question.

Rick Broadbent: Yes, hi Usain, congratulations. Just following in from the last one really – I read that Asafa Powell believes he can run sub 9.70; do you think that is feasible for you at some point in the future?

Usain Bolt: I don’t know, but Asafa is a great athlete and I respect him a lot. We’re good friends, so if he said he can do it, I think he can do it, but I am not really worried World Records, and all that. I got my World Record so I am just happy and enjoying it right now, I am just really looking forward to the upcoming Olympics.

Rick Broadbent: Dwain Chambers got a lot of publicity in the UK Usain; he is making a comeback outdoors tomorrow – he is obviously served a drug ban. Would you have any problem in running against Dwayne in the future given that he has served a drug ban or you are happy to line up against him?

Usain Bolt: No, that is cool with me, I run with anybody, really. I go out there and I just perform; as long as I am scheduled to be at the meet, it doesn’t really matter who is there, I am going to run. I am happy with that.

Operator: Your next question today comes from Jean Cherry. Please ask your question.

Jean Cherry(Gene Cherry): Congratulations Usain. To follow up, and then I have another question. Would you have any problems running against athlete who have served a doping ban?

Usain Bolt: No, as I said earlier, as long I am scheduled at a meet, I don’t see a problem. I go there to compete and I am going to go there and do my best no matter who I am running against.

Jean Cherry(Gene Cherry): And the follow up is who will ultimately make the decision on what you do at the Games, you or your coach?

Usain Bolt: The coach will definitely decide on how we do it.

Jean Cherry(Gene Cherry): One more question Chris. What do you hope to do after the Trials to get ready for the Games; a combination of 100m and 200 or will you decide after the Trials what you will run and then go run a couple of those events?

Usain Bolt: This one is also the coach’s decision. I have one more scheduled race before my trials and that is Ostrava so, after Ostrava, then the trials, then I am not sure what we will be doing, so. The coach will decide exactly what we are doing after the trials.

Operator: The next question today comes from Eddie Pells. Please ask your question.

Eddie Pells: Usain, congratulations. I was wondering you said you looked up to Asafa but when you were much younger did you have any track heroes?

Usain Bolt: Yes, actually Michael Johnson and Don Quarrie and Herb McKenley was – I looked up to those guys growing up, track and field.

Eddie Pells: And what was it about them, other than we know they were extremely fast – is there anything that you saw in them?

Usain Bolt: To me Michael Johnson is one of the greatest ever, been in the sport and Herb McKenley also, he is one of the greatest Jamaicans I know who has been in this sport; and Don Quarrie is the greatest runner that I have ever seen. So I really idolise these guys.

Eddie Pells: About when did you realise that you were fast and that you could do this, at this level, and was there a certain race or certain year or something like that?

Usain Bolt: Well I would say World Juniors kind of opened my eyes because I did so well at World Juniors and I kept on going after that, so I would say World Juniors.

Chris Turner: Thanks very much Eddie. Operator, please, next question.

Operator: Your next question today comes from Richard Lewis. Please ask your question.

Richard Lewis: Hi, there, guys, hi Usain. In terms of meeting Asafa Powell and Tyson Gay later in the year; would you want to do that before the Olympics or will you avoid running against them?

Usain Bolt: No, I wouldn’t avoid running against anybody. As I said as long as I am scheduled at a meet it doesn’t really matter who is there, I will compete because I go there to compete and it is always good to compete with toughest competitors before the Olympics, so I don’t have a problem to compete with anybody.

Richard Lewis: And just a follow on from a few earlier bits earlier – you were saying you wouldn’t mind, you have no problems with people who have had a doping ban. What actually are your thoughts about the whole stigma of sprinting at the moment, because it has gone through a pretty bad period hasn’t it, with all the recent events from the courtroom to the jail basically for people. What is your general views about things?

Usain Bolt: Well, I don’t really think about it too much because I just go there to compete, it doesn’t really matter to me what other people want to do as long as I stay clean and do my best – I try to lead by example, so I just say clean and do my best when I go there.

Richard Lewis: Do you feel you could be perhaps a standard bearer for a new age of the sport to show that it can be done clean and it can be done properly?

Usain Bolt: Yes, definitely.

Chris Turner: Operator, please next question.

Usain Bolt: Your next question today comes from Philipp Vandeweyer. Please ask your question.

Philipp Vandeweyer: Yes, Philip again. You said that you don’t know yet if you are going to double in Beijing, but which number do you prefer – the 100 or the 200?

Usain Bolt: Well I am doing good in 100 but I prefer running my 200 because I have been dedicating my whole life really to the 200 and I really would like to get a gold medal at the Olympics in the 200, so I prefer 200 for the Olympics.

Philipp Vandeweyer: If I can follow up on that – you also, you have a fantastic, now, team of sprinters in Jamaica. Are you looking also forward to the 4X100 relay and is the World Record there a possibility with the quality of runners you do have now in Jamaica?

Usain Bolt: I think so, if the baton goes around because last year we had a wonderful team and we messed up really bad in the baton change so I think if the baton goes right but it does as well as it’s supposed to go, it should…the World Record is going to be…I think maybe we could break it, I think so.

Philipp Vandeweyer: Okay, thank you.

Operator: Your next question today comes from Mike Rowbottom. Please ask your question.

Mike Rowbottom: Hi Usain, you may have answered this question before – but have you had any thoughts or have you spoken at all about competing in Britain this season?

Usain Bolt: Yes, I think we may be competing in London because every year I actually go to the London Grand Prix, so I think I [audio] I would say. So, I think I am not sure, you will have to ask my agent this question, but I am not sure.

Mike Rowbottom: Have you spoken to him about it recently, I mean have you spoken to him it since you ran 9.72?

Usain Bolt: Repeat, I didn’t hear it; it was kind of low.

Chris Turner: Can you repeat Mike?

Mike Rowbottom: Have you spoken to your agent about races since you ran the 9.72?

Usain Bolt: Well actually my coach and my agent deals with where I run, so I don’t directly speak to my agent; my coach does that – about where we race.

Chris Turner: Okay, thank you Mike. And just a follow up here to clarify, what is your race – is it Ostrava in the 200m?

Usain Bolt: Yes.

Chris Turner: It is. Okay, operator, next question please.

Operator: Your next question today comes from Paul Gains. Please ask your question.

Paul Gains: Thanks. Usain, what was the reaction when you got home to Jamaica, what kind of reaction did you get?

Usain Bolt: Well, it was great, a lot of people were happy. They said they were screaming and that they were really happy that I did it. A lot of people said that they are just glad I beat Tyson Gay, they are just happy for me, and it was great around here.

Paul Gains: Once you got out of doping control in New York, very late I think it was two o’clock in the morning or something wasn’t it, how did you celebrate, or did you celebrate?

Usain Bolt: I just went out with some friends, we chilled, just eat some food, we just chilled out pretty much. It was really late when we got back, so, we couldn’t actually go to parties so we just chilled out.

Paul Gains: The final question I have for you is – at the race itself were you nervous about racing against Tyson Gay; this is before the race.

Usain Bolt: No, actually, no I wasn’t.

Chris Turner: That is pretty straight forward, no he wasn’t; thank you Paul. Operator, next question please.

Operator: Your next question today comes from Pat Butcher. Please ask your question.

Pat Butcher: I will add my congratulations Usain, and it is pretty much a lead out from that last question from Paul Gains. Look, you told me how relaxed you were before your races, you said even 10 minutes before you were just sort of joking around and he said I felt I had to try and get you to take it seriously. Just compare that to say the World Champs, last year. I mean when you go through rounds and semi-finals presumably you do build up a level of expectation and you have to take it more seriously – will that be the same at the Olympics. I mean or are you just as relaxed?

Usain Bolt: To me, I just, I don’t really try to think about it really so much. I think the one reason, before, like the night before decide what I need to do. Tell myself that you need to do this, and you need to do that and then the day on the race I just try to relax, think about other stuff, otherwise on the race I try and think about maybe cars or something, otherwise on the race I keep myself relaxed, because if you think about racing too much you may just lose it a little bit.

Pat Butcher: Okay. Then a lot of people would have noticed in the last ten years or so that Jamaican athletes and maybe Caribbean athletes in general are not going to the USA no more on scholarships. Was there ever a question that you might go to a US scholarship?

Usain Bolt: No, absolutely, I asked not to go overseas. Really, I can't really live outside of Jamaica, I get really homesick easy and I am not really a fan of cold weather either, so.

Pat Butcher: Thanks very much.

Chris Turner: Thank you Pat. Operator next question please.

Operator: Your next question today comes from Mike Hurst. Please ask your question.

Mike Hurst: Hi Usain congratulations again, from Australia. Hello everybody.

Chris Turner: Good morning to you, you are in the middle of your night aren’t you, so well done Mike for staying up.

Mike Hurst: What have you changed since last year in your training?

Usain Bolt: Well, I think personally I have matured more really. After getting the Silver at the World Championships I have matured a lot because I have seen, I have gotten so near to the goal so I have just changed by attitude a little bit more. I was serious last year; well I am more serious now because I really want it, so. And I have done more training I would say, like technical stuff, like my start, I have done a lot of work on my start and my transitions, so those are the two main things I have changed.

Mike Hurst: Have you made any extreme improvements in strength gains.

Usain Bolt: Well, yes, I have gone to the gym more. I would say. I was very reluctant to go to the gym but my coach said we were going to do the 100m to get my strength up so I have gone to the gym more.

Mike Hurst: Sorry to press the case, but do you have any steps like a benchpress or a power clean PB or squat PB?

Usain Bolt: No. No, actually I just go to the gym. As I said earlier I am not really a fan for the weight training, so I don’t really max out, I just do enough that my assistant coach, so he actually helps out, so he gives me what I do, but I don’t really max out, so I can't really say what is my PB.

Operator: Your next question today comes from Stefano Semararo. Please ask your question.

Stefano Semararo: Hi Usain, I am from Italy for you.

Usain Bolt: Hi.

Stefano Semararo: Hi, hello.

Chris Turner: He said hello, yes, don’t worry.

Usain Bolt: Yes, don’t worry.

Chris Turner: He is a polite gentleman as we are finding.

Stefano Semararo: Good, congratulations. You are such a tall guy do you think that you are the perfect athlete for the future or is it just one Usain?

Chris Turner: I think he was asking you are a very tall guy Usain, is that the sort of the future of sprinting, like when [unclear] came into 400 and 800m runners, the big man, they thought that was going to transform middle distance running. I think the question was you are very tall, is that the future of sprinting?

Usain Bolt: I don’t know; I am just doing my thing; I don’t know if sprinting is going to change, I don’t know really. I cannot answer that question really.

Stefano Semararo: One more, are you still playing cricket?

Usain Bolt: In the cricket season I help my brother out, training but otherwise I don’t.

Stefano Semararo: Okay, thank you.

Chris Turner: That is probably why you are so relaxed isn't it, really. Operator, next question please.

Operator: Your next question today comes from Natalia Maryanchik. Please ask your question.

Natalia Maryanchik: Hello Usain, could you tell a bit about your relationship with Asafa Powell; did he congratulate you with the record and in general what kind of relationship do you have?

Usain Bolt: Yes, actually we have a very good relationship. He called me and told me congrats and actually saw him this morning when I was training, and he was training also. So we talked and we laughed, he is a good friend, so we have a good relationship.

Chris Turner: Do you want to ask a follow up?

Natalia Maryanchik: Yes, thank you that is all.

Chris Turner: Okay. Operator next question please.

Operator: Your next question today comes from Thomas Hahn. Please ask your question.

Thomas Hahn: Yes, hello, this is Thomas Hahn from Germany. I would like to know what can you say about the rivalry to the United States; what kind of advantages have the Jamaicans and what kind of advantages have the Americans?

Usain Bolt: Rivalry, I wouldn’t say advantages –

Chris Turner: What do you mean? Physical advantages, mental?

Thomas Hahn: No, no, just kind of training systems or philosophies or mental issues, I don’t know, whatever.

Usain Bolt: I don’t know, I can't really say, we don’t…as athletes I think we just go there to compete against each other. Everybody has their own way of training, so there is different ways of training, so we just go there to compete against them, so I wouldn’t say we have advantage. Everybody trains different and everybody would move to the right place to get the right training going. If you need to move somewhere to get weights or so forth and so on because Veronica trains in the US and she is doing well. And Asafa we train in Jamaica, we are doing well. So I wouldn’t say there are any advantages, we just, it is just all about the coach and how you apply yourself in training.

Thomas Hahn: Thank you.

Chris Turner: Operator next question please.

Operator: Your next question today comes from Jean Cherry. Please ask your question.

Jean Cherry (Gene Cherry): Usain, would you ask for an exemption from the trials for one of the events so you wouldn’t have to run against Asafa or would you definitely run both?

Usain Bolt: Yes, well I am definitely going to run. I would say a lot of people are building up these trials to be a big thing but I don’t think the trials will be that big because I am not really going there to race Asafa I am going there just to make the team really. Maybe on another basis, in another track meet if we meet then there I think there will be the showdown but in the trials I don’t think it will that of a big deal. But, actually to me I don’t think it will be a big deal to me.

Jean Cherry: Do you want to win the trials or would you just be happy to make the team?

Usain Bolt: Yes, I just want to make the team, really. I am not really worried because there are two events so I have to worry about the 200.

Chris Turner: Okay Jean, thank you. Operator next question please.

Operator: Your next question today comes from Richard Lewis. Please ask your question.

Richard Lewis: Usain, you talk about going to the Olympics and definitely doing the 200 and thinking about the 100 – just explain to us more after last weekend what the reason is for that and why you haven’t got it the other way around since you are in your form with the 100m at the moment.

Usain Bolt: I said earlier that really I have been dedicating my life to 200m, I have been doing this for years, I have done well, and I am getting better so I really respect, I really love the 200 a lot so that is why I really want to get a gold medal in the 200m. So, I am working really hard on that right now.

Richard Lewis: And just could you just clarify also, exactly how many 100m races you have actually run?

Usain Bolt: This year?

Richard Lewis: No, in your career, because there was talk of it being five or six or different figures.

Usain Bolt: Yes, I think it was five.

Richard Lewis: Five is it, thanks, yes.

Chris Turner: Okay, operator, next question please.

Operator: Your next question today comes from Mike Hurst. Please ask your question.

Chris Turner: Oh, good morning again.

Mike Hurst: Still awake. Usain, in light of what you have done this season with three 100m individual races so quick – is it possible you made a mistake by not running the 100 in Osaka World Championships last year.

Usain Bolt: I don’t know. We can't really say. We are not sure. We weren’t prepared to run the 100 because we weren’t training for it, so I wouldn’t say it will be a mistake. We weren’t prepared for that.

Chris Turner: He has to continue training with his coach you know Mike. You don’t want to ask that. Do you want to follow up Mike?

Mike Hurst: The reason I ask is because you led Tyson Gay at the top of the straight in the 200 final and the first 50 of your 200 final in Osaka, if the splits are correct was second fastest only ever to Michael Johnson. So, obviously you were capable of running an extremely fast 100 at the time of the Osaka World Championships.

Usain Bolt: Okay, well I never knew that. I will have to speak to the coach. I will have to say to the coach, I will have to say ‘Coach, you made a mistake.’

Chris Turner: Okay, operator, next question please.

Operator: Once again if you wish to ask a question please press *1 on your telephone and wait for your name to be announced. If you wish to cancel your request please press the # key. Your next question today comes from Philipp Vandeweyer. Please ask your question.

Philipp Vandeweyer: Yes, Usain. Last year you missed a lot of duals between Tyson Gay and Asafa Powell for various reasons, can we expect to see the three of you guys at the start of a 100m before Beijing or do you think that is totally excluded.

Usain Bolt: Well, I don’t know. I said it earlier, as long as I am scheduled to run I am ready, I am always there to compete with anybody, so as long as I am scheduled to run and they are lined up beside me I have no problem.

Philipp Vandeweyer: If I can follow up – your coach always wanted you to go on the 400 one day, is it excluded and if yes, until when?

Usain Bolt: Well, I would say it is out of the picture for now, I would say, maybe down, maybe when I am 25, I don’t know, but not anytime soon I am sure.

Philipp Vandeweyer: Thank you.

Chris Turner: Operator, please, next question.

Operator: Your next question today comes from Michael Reinsch. Please ask your question.

Michael Reinsch: Hi, Usain, congratulations here from Berlin as well. Actually, my first question is a simple one. You obviously worked on the improvement of your start before running the World Record, what else can you work on to improve your 100m an what will it be and what time will come out of that?

Usain Bolt: Well, I would say that is a question for my coach because he sits and analyses the race, I don’t really, I think I ran a perfect race, but my coach sees those fine problems with my race, so, you have to direct that question to my coach.

Michael Reinsch: Yes, thank you. You talked about being more serious now in your training and your working out and stuff, can you tell us exactly what you gave up for being such a serious athlete?

Usain Bolt: I used to go to gym less but I started going more and I never really liked the gym. From when I was young I don’t really like weights but I go to the gym more; less partying I would say. I still go, but less partying. As I said I just got more serious; when I go there I put my mind to the work, sometimes it is hard and you just want to stop but I put my mind to it, I try my best at all times. So, just serious things but it helps.

Michael Reinsch: May I ask you what you mean by ‘party’ – is it just staying out late night or is it dancing or is it even drinking alcohol?

Usain Bolt: I don’t really drink a lot, I do drink but I don’t really drink a lot, but I would say I like to dance. I like music a lot; I normally go out a little more than I should so I stopped doing that now.

Michael Reinsch: Alright, I know yes, thanks.

Chris Turner: Thank you Michael. Just a quick one Usain before we pass on to the next question. You said that it was down to your coach to analyse your technique but earlier, one of my first questions you said about how you admire Don Quarrie’s bend particularly in the 200m – what is particularly about Don you admire.

Usain Bolt: To me, he is just smooth I would say. If you sit and watch Don Quarrie, he is one of the smoothest bend runners ever. He has done so well over the years he has made his name with running the bund, so I have watched a couple of races and I picked up a few stuff.

Operator: Your next question today comes from Rick Broadbent. Please ask your question.

Rick Broadbent: Yes, hello again, sorry if you had come back to me because I lost the call for a bit – but if it has been asked before forgive me. Usain, you said that you’d get Glen decide what you do in Beijing; if he says that you will only do the 200 would you seriously be happy with not running the 100 in Beijing?

Usain Bolt: Well, yes, my coach. I have been with my coach, this is my fourth year with my coach and he has made nothing but good decisions so if he decides that and said we are running the 200m then I am fine with that because he has his reasons and I am sure there will be a good reason.

Rick Broadbent: Okay, thanks.

Chris Turner: Okay, operator, next question please.

Operator: Your next question today comes from Mike Hurst. Please ask your question.

Mike Hurst: You guys are getting are tired out there. Usain, do you think that you could possibly end the Jamaican drought in the Olympic 100m if your coach gives you the go ahead?

Usain Bolt: Hello.

Mike Hurst: You didn’t hear that one. Do you want me to rephrase it?

Chris Turner: Yes, if you could Mike.

Mike Hurst: I think the Jamaican men have never won the Olympic 100m and I am wondering whether if Glen Mills let's you run the 100, do you think you can change that historical drought?

Usain Bolt: Well, yes, there is a possibility. I am not a [unclear] so there is a good, some possibility I could change that.

Chris Turner: And would that in-still your old partying; would you start partying again?

Usain Bolt: I am not going to answer that question.

Chris Turner: Operator, next question please.

Operator: Once again if you wish to ask a question please press *1 on your telephone and wait for your name to be announced. If you wish to cancel your request please press the # key. Your next question today comes from Paul Gains. Please ask your question.

Paul Gains: Usain, I just wanted to go back to the 200 and the fact that you got a PB of 19.75 and you run now 9.76 and 9.72 during the season you must be in a position to obliterate that personal best. How fast do you think you can run, first of all in Ostrava and later on in the season?

Usain Bolt: Well, Ostrava is a cold place I would say, but as I said earlier I am not, I don’t predict my 200 times until I actually run my first 200, so after the 200 in Ostrava then I can maybe predict what time I can run, how fast I can go.

Paul Gains: Usain, you must feel pretty good with a couple of improvements in your 100m time to suggest that you can run a lot faster in the 200. Would you agree with that?

Usain Bolt: Yes, I would definitely agree with that, yes. I am really glad for my improvement so far.

Paul Gains: If you ended the season with just a 19.75 would you be disappointed?

Usain Bolt: If I – repeat.

Chris Turner: If you repeated your National Record 19.75 this season, and that was your fastest you went, would you be happy with this season at 200?

Usain Bolt: No, I wouldn’t, no, no.

Chris Turner: I think that is pretty clear Paul. Right, now I know Asafa will do it at Ostrava, I know Usain has already said how he prefers the 200 to the 400 and he is already doing quite an endurance status here. Can we just have a last few questions now, so operator, please next question.

Operator: Once again if you wish to ask a question please press *1 on your telephone and wait for your name to be announced. If you wish to cancel your request please press the # key. Your next question today comes from Joerg Wenig. Please ask your question.

Joerg Wenig: Usain, congratulations from Berlin again. Can you tell us how you once found your way to athletics and did you do other sports before?

Usain Bolt: Actually I started playing cricket when I was young, then my cricket coach saw me running and decided that I should try track and field, so I did and I started doing running so I continued. And I also played basketball sometimes.

Chris Turner: Do you want to have a follow up Joerg?

Joerg Wenig: Yes, thank you. And was there a specific moment when you said okay, sprinting is for me?

Usain Bolt: Well, I have been doing it from when I was young, I started just to see that I have been winning, so I guess from the get go.

Joerg Wenig: Okay.

Chris Turner: Okay, operator, one more question please if there is one there.

Operator: Your next question today comes from Thomas Hahn. Please ask your question.

Thomas Hahn: I would like to know how much was Asafa Powell an inspiration for you.

Usain Bolt: Yes, definitely Asafa is a great sprinter and I look up to him, I tell him all the time, so he was a great influence on me and I always watch him run. So, he has a big influence on this I would say.

Thomas Hahn: Also because he was one of the sprinters who did not go to the USA, is that also something?

Usain Bolt: Yes, well, I wouldn’t say that entirely but he is a great athlete and a good friend that I respect him a lot. I told him that I really look up to him because he is good athlete and I respect him a lot.

Thomas Hahn: Okay, thank you.

Chris Turner: Thank you very much to everybody, and to you Usain it seems the best moment, new World Record holder talking about the past record holder. I would like to thank everybody and particularly you Usain for giving your time and look forward to speaking to you next time. Thank you.

Usain Bolt: Alright, thank you very much.

Chris Turner: Thank you operator.

Operator: You’re welcome.

Usain Bolt: Thank you operator.

Operator: That does conclude our conference for today. Thank you all for participating. You may all disconnect.

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